Health knowledge made personal
Join this community!
› Share page:
Go
Search posts:

Trends in Environmental Pollutants

Posted Jan 28 2013 10:08pm
Posted on Jan. 25, 2013, 6 a.m. in Environment Respiratory

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued the 2011 Edition of the “Toxics Release Inventory (TRI), reporting data on toxic chemical releases to the air, water and land, as well as information on waste management and pollution prevention activities by facilities across the country. The Report finds that while total toxic air releases in 2011 declined 8% from 2010, mostly because of decreases in hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions, the total releases of toxic chemicals (involving the air, water and land ) increased for the second year in a row.  Among the HAPs showing decline were hydrochloric acid and mercury. Likely reasons for the decreases seen over the past several years include installation of control technologies at coal fired power plants and a shift to other fuel sources. Releases into surface water decreased 3% and releases to land increased 19% since 2010, with the latter again due primarily to the metal mining sector which experienced increases in land disposal at metal mines.

“2011 Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) Analysis.”  US Environmental Protection Agency, January 2013.

  
Many whole grain foods are not as quite as healthy as you may think.
People who are lonely produce more inflammation-related proteins in response to acute stress, potentially contributing to coronary heart disease and more.
US Forest Service reports that the loss of 100 million trees has caused an increase in cardiovascular and lower-respiratory-tract illnesses
Although emissions of toxic air pollutants in the United States continue to decline, total releases of toxic chemicals in the air, water and land are on the ris
A type of meditation, known as mindfulness-based stress reduction, helps to relieve the inflammation response seen in arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and
Women who experience migraine with aura may be at higher risk for major cardiovascular events.
Women who eat three or more servings of blueberries and strawberries per week may reduce their risk of heart attack by as much as one-third.
Canadian researchers identify a molecule that stimulates the activity of the brain's immune cells, leading the way to the development of a treatment for Alzheim
People who receive acupuncture while exercising display enhanced exercise performance, and recover more quickly from an exercise session as well.
Despite known risks and recommendations for protective equipment, many people are still affected with asthma after exposure to chemicals at work.
An international study reports a link between passive smoking and syndromes of dementia.
Triclosan, an antibacterial chemical found in numerous personal care products, may contribute to an increased risk of allergy development in children.
The antibiotic-resistant “superbug” methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is prevalent at several US wastewater treatment plants.
Two United Nations agencies have mapped the intersection of health and climate in an age of global warming.
Long-term exposure to fine particulate matter decreases flow-mediated brachial artery dilation.
People who are exposed to mold in their homes could be at an increased risk for sarcoidosis, a chronic inflammatory lung disease.
High noise levels can put people at-risk of annoyance as well as sleep disturbance, both of which can have serious health consequences.
People with severe coronary artery disease have been found to have higher-than-normal levels of the plastic bisphenol-A (BPA) in their urine.
Roofers and road construction workers who use hot asphalt experience elevated blood high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).
Link between climate change, ozone loss and possible increase in skin cancer incidence.
Anti-Aging Forum MLDP Join A4M
#113 - Procrastination Payoff
Kinston University (United Kingdom) researchers reported in 2005 that an unmade bed, while unattractive to the eyes, is unappealing to house dust mites, tiny bugs (shorter than 1 mm long) that feed on shed human skin cells and produce excretions that, when inhaled by people, can cause allergic reactions and asthma. According to the team, the average bed can house as many as 1.5 million dust mites. When a bed is made immediately or shortly after people get out of it, moisture can become trapped in the sheets and mattress, creating a haven for the mites. Moisture is minimized in unmade beds, and as a result the mites will more be more likely to dehydrate and die than feast and multiply.
 
Post a comment
Write a comment:

Related Searches