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Telomeres Tell Longevity

Posted Mar 29 2013 10:11pm
Posted on March 27, 2013, 6 a.m. in Longevity Cardio-Vascular
Telomeres Tell Longevity

Telomeres are the end caps of chromosomes, protecting the DNA complexes from deterioration during cell division. Telomere shortening is considered a marker of cellular aging, and prematurely shortened telomeres have been linked to increased risk of cancers, heart disease, dementia and death. John Carlquist, from the University of Utah (Utah, USA), and colleagues tested DNA samples from over 3,500 heart attack and stroke patients. They drew upon an archive of peripheral blood DNA samples collected from nearly 30,000 heart patients, with as much as 20 years of follow-up clinical and survival data. Correlating the data with samples tested, the team was able to predict survival rates among patients with heart disease based on the telomere lengths. The lead investigator comments that: "I believe telomere length could be used in the future as a way to measure the effectiveness of heart care treatment."

John Carlquist, Stacey Knight, Richard M. Cawthon, Benjamin Horne, Jeffrey Rollo, John Huntinghouse, J. Muhlestein, Jeffrey Anderson.  “Telomere Length Is Associated with Survival, Patients Preferred for Angiography." Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 61, Issue 10, Supplement, 12 March 2013, Page E1509.

  
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Anti-Aging Forum MLDP Join A4M
Tip #141 - Men – Get Moving
Previous studies have suggested that physical activity decreases the risk of certain cancers. University of California, Los Angeles (USA) researchers have found that men who work in jobs that require a continuous level of high physical effort are at reduced risks of developing prostate cancer. The team compared the physical activity of 392 workers who developed prostate cancer with 1,805 men similarly employed and of similar age. Amongst a group of aerospace workers, 64% of whom were involved in work that required sustained and high levels of physical activity, the odds for prostate cancer were 45% lower, as compared to their less active counterparts.

Don’t underestimate the health benefits of physical activity, be it leisure-time exercise, competitive sports, or at-work exertion. Check with your anti-aging physician to make sure the level of your physical activity is appropriate for your medical needs.
 
 
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