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Sugar Excess May Damage Heart

Posted Jul 11 2013 10:08pm
Posted on July 9, 2013, 6 a.m. in Cardio-Vascular Diet
Sugar Excess May Damage Heart

Too much sugar can set people down a pathway to heart failure, according to a study from researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (Texas, USA).  Heinrich Taegtmeyer and colleagues report that a single small molecule, the glucose metabolite glucose 6-phosphate (G6P), causes stress to the heart that changes the muscle proteins and induces poor pump function leading to heart failure, as demonstrated by an animal model as well in tissue taken from patients at the Texas Heart Institute. In that G6P can accumulate from eating too much starch and/or sugar, the study authors “implicate a critical role for G6P in load-induced mTOR activation and [endoplasmic reticulum] stress,” proposing that: “glucose metabolic changes precede and regulate functional (and possibly also structural) remodeling of the heart.”

Sen S, Kundu BK, Wu HC, Hashmi SS, Guthrie P, Locke Taegtmeyer H, et al.  “Glucose Regulation of Load-Induced mTOR Signaling and ER Stress in Mammalian Heart.”  J Am Heart Assoc. 2013 May 17;2(3):e004796.

  
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Tip #187 - Milk The Benefits
Dairy and dairy products have been studied extensively for their promising health benefits:

• Combat Heart Disease & Stroke: University of Reading (United Kingdom) researchers studied findings from 324 studies of milk consumption as predictors of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke and, diabetes. Data on milk consumption and cancer were based on the recent World Cancer Research Fund report. The team found that drinking milk can lessen the chances of dying from illnesses such as coronary heart disease and stroke by up to 15-20%. Separately, researchers from Bristol University (United Kingdom) studied data from the Carnegie (“Boyd Orr”) survey of diet and health in pre-war Britain. Tracking the lives and the dairy intake of 4,374 children between 1948 and 2005, the researchers found that 1,468 (34%) of them had died, and 378 of those deaths were caused by coronary heart disease and 121 were due to stroke. Not only did the study suggest that dairy rich diets in childhood do not contribute to heart problems later, the team found that higher childhood calcium intake was associated with lower stroke mortality. In addition, children who were in the group that had the highest calcium intake and dairy product consumption were found to have lower mortality rates than those in the lower intake groups.

• Maintain Cognitive Health: Researchers from the University of Oxford (United Kingdom) studied whether foods rich in Vitamin B-12 might counter homocysteine, a compound for which high levels are linked to an increased risk of heart disease and cognitive decline including Alzheimer's Disease. The team monitored 5,937 subjects in two age groups (47-49 years, and 71-74 years) participating in the Hordaland Homocysteine Study in Norway, surveying them for their daily food intake patterns. The team observed that those subjects with low B-12 levels suffered twice as much brain shrinkage as compared to those study participants with higher blood levels of the vitamin. The researchers observed two glasses of skim milk daily can help that raise plasma vitamin B-12 levels.
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