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Soaring Numbers of Cancer Survivors

Posted Apr 18 2013 10:09pm
Posted on April 16, 2013, 6 a.m. in Demographics

The number of cancer survivors in the United States will approach 18 million, up 31% from about 13.7 million as of Jan. 1, 2012, reports Julia Rowland, from the US National Cancer Institute (Maryland, USA),  and colleagues. The team’s "Cancer Survivors in the United States” Report submits that the growing number of cancer survivors is partly related to better care, but more so the increase in the number of survivors will be due primarily to an aging of the population, where "by 2020, we expect that two-thirds of cancer survivors are going to be age 65 or older." Currently, 64% of cancer survivors have lived at least 5 years since diagnosis, 40% have survived 10 years or more, and 15% have survived at least 20 years.  Over the next decade, the Report projects that the number of people who have lived at least 5 years after diagnosis is will increase approximately 37% to 11.9 million driven in large part by long-term survivors –as the largest relative increase in the number of cancer survivors will be among people who are at least 15 years post diagnosis, where prevalence is projected to increase from 3.4 million or 25% of all survivors in 2012 to 5 million or 28% of all survivors in 2022.

de Moor JS, Mariotto AB, Parry C, Alfano CM, Padgett L, Kent EE, Forsythe L, Scoppa S, Hachey M, Rowland JH.  “Cancer Survivors in the United States: Prevalence across the Survivorship Trajectory and Implications for Care.”  Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2013 Apr;22(4):561-70.

  
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Tip #150 - Go Nuts
A number of studies have established a body of evidence linking nut consumption to potential beneficial effects for heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer's Disease, and cancer:

Heart Disease: Researchers from Loma Linda University (California, USA) studied results of 25 nut consumption trials involving 583 men and women with normal and high cholesterol levels. Results showed that daily consumption of a small bag (67g) of nuts reduced total cholesterol by 5.1% and LDL cholesterol by 7.4%. Eating nuts was also found to reduce triglyceride levels by 10.2% in participants with blood triglyceride levels of at least 150 mg/dL, but not in those with lower levels. The benefits of nut consumption were greatest in those with high baseline LDL cholesterol levels and a low body mass index (BMI).

A team from Pennsylvania State University (Pennsylvania, USA) followed a group of 25 men and women with mildly elevated cholesterol levels, for a five-week period. One subgroup consumed an “average” American diet [33% total fat, including 11% monunsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and 5% polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA)] and the other subgroup ate a Macadamia nut-rich diet [33% total fat, including 18% MUFA and 5% PUFA]. In the group consuming the macadamia nut-rich diet, the ratio of total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol decreased (4.60, versus 4.90 in the group following the American diet). In addition, the macadamia nut-diet group experienced a decrease in LDL (low-density, or “bad”) cholesterol (3.14 mmol/L, versus 3.44 mmol/L in the group following the American diet).

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