Health knowledge made personal
Join this community!
› Share page:
Go
Search posts:

Slow Lifestyle Changes Compromise Health

Posted May 12 2013 10:11pm
Posted on May 10, 2013, 6 a.m. in Cardio-Vascular Lifestyle

While previous studies suggest that patients who have experienced a cardiovascular event should adjust habits to fit a healthier lifestyle to reduce risks of recurrent disease, only small proportions of individuals followed recommended lifestyle changes.  Researchers involved in The Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) Study, involving 7,519 participants from rural and urban communities in high-, middle-, and low-income countries, report that 14.3% of patients worldwide did not alter smoking, engagement in physical activity, or healthy eating habits following disease incidence.  Trends in changes of eating and smoking habits varied significantly by average country income designation, with patients in low-income countries having the lowest prevalence of healthy dieting (25.8% versus 43.4% in high-income countries) and smoking cessation (38.1% versus 74.9%) following disease incidence. Post-cardiovascular incident high levels of physical activity were common to around one-third of participants (35.1%), though differences between countries were not significant.  Nearly 40% of participants reported eating a healthy diet (39%), though prevalence varied by country average income.  By combination of healthy behavior, 42.7% of participants adopted at least one healthy behavior after coronary heart disease or stroke incidence, while 30.6% adopted two behaviors, and 4.3% followed all healthy guidelines. The study authors write that: “Among a sample of patients with a [coronary heart disease] or stroke event from countries with varying income levels, the prevalence of healthy lifestyle behaviors was low, with even lower levels in poorer countries.”

Koon Teo, MB, Scott Lear, Shofiqul Islam, Prem Mony, Mahshid Dehghan, Wei Li, et al., on behalf of the PURE Investigators.  “Prevalence of a Healthy Lifestyle Among Individuals With Cardiovascular Disease in High-, Middle- and Low-Income Countries: The Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) Study.”  JAMA. 2013;309(15):1613-1621.

  
An at-home exercise program for people with Alzheimer's disease helps them cope with activities of daily living, without increasing health and social care costs
1 in 7 heart disease or stroke patients fail to adopt healthy lifestyle choices following the medical event.
Cocoa flavonols beneficially alter signal transduction pathways involved in neuron death as well as neuroprotection.
A high heart rate may be an independent risk factor for mortality, among fit men.
A cup of beetroot juice a day may help reduce blood pressure by as much as 10 mm Hg.
Routine dental cleanings and treating periodontal disease may reduce a person’s risks of ischemic stroke.
A diet rich in antioxidants may reduce a woman’s risk of heart failure by 42%.
Stroke and subclinical markers of vascular disease may be predicative of those older patients with type 2 diabetes who may develop cognitive decline.
Cognitive training exercises – and completing crossword puzzles and Sudoku – may help to prevent cognitive decline in aging.
Diets laden with fried and sweet foods, processed and red meats refined grains, and high-fat dairy products reduce a person's likelihood of achieving older ages
A high heart rate may be an independent risk factor for mortality, among fit men.
A diet rich in antioxidants may reduce a woman’s risk of heart failure by 42%.
Stroke and subclinical markers of vascular disease may be predicative of those older patients with type 2 diabetes who may develop cognitive decline.
Diets laden with fried and sweet foods, processed and red meats refined grains, and high-fat dairy products reduce a person's likelihood of achieving older ages
Generational shifts in metabolic risk factors suggest that today’s adults are less healthy than their predecessors.
The extent of a person’s energy expenditure is a key determinant in risk reductions for hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, and coronary heart disease
Among people with Metabolic Syndrome, green tea may confer antioxidant protection key to cardiovascular health.
Seven tenets of the anti-aging lifestyle not only reduce a person’s risks of heart disease, but may combat cancer as well.
Physically active doctors are more likely to encourage regular physical activity in their patients.
Evidence links shortened telomeres to the risk of developing heart disease, multiple sclerosis and various cancers.
Anti-Aging Forum MLDP Join A4M
Tip #161 - Benefits of Green Tea
Green tea is made from the Camellia sinesis plant, where the leaves and stems are not aged and undergo very little processing. Containing less caffeine than black tea, green tea is most noted for an antioxidant compound known as epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), which has been shown to inhibit an anti-apoptotic protein involved In some types of cancer. Green tea may have a future interventive role in combating a number of diseases:

• Heart Disease: Researchers from Athens Medical School (Greece) studied 14 healthy men and women (average age 30 years) and found that regular consumption of green tea improved the function of the heart’s endothelial cells (cells lining the walls of blood vessels). Specifically, green tea consumed on three occasions at a dose of 6 grams, increased the flow-mediated dilation (FMD), a measure of the blood vessel’s ability to relax, by 3.9% within 30 minutes after consumption of the beverage.

• High Blood Pressure & Elevated Cholesterol: University of Florida (USA) researchers studied 52 healthy men and 72 healthy women, ages 21 to 70 years, assigning them to receive daily one of three green tea extract nutritional supplements, or placebo. After 3 weeks, those subjects who received the green tea supplements experienced reduced blood pressure [5 mmHg (systole) and 4 mmHg (diastole)], reduced total cholesterol [10 mg/dL], and reduced LDL (low-density, “bad”) cholesterol [9 mg/dL]. Further, after 3 months of supplementation with green tea extract, study subjects had a 12% lower oxidative stress marker as well as a 42% reduction in a chronic inflammation marker.

• Breast Cancer: A team from Vanderbilt School of Medicine (Tennessee, USA) studied 3,454 women with breast cancer, ages 20 to 74 years, and a comparable control group of 3,474 similarly aged women. All of the women were individually interviewed and their habits in drinking green tea were assessed. The team found that regular consumption of green tea was associated with a 12% reduction in the risk of breast cancer. In addition, premenopausal women reaped increased benefits relative to the number of years they had been regular green tea drinkers.

• Weight Loss: A team from Provident Clinical Research (Indiana, USA) assessed 107 subjects in a 12-week long study. Each study participant received either a green tea beverage containing 625 mg of catechins with 39 mg caffeine or a control beverage (39 mg caffeine, no catechins). During the study period, the subjects each completed 180 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity per week...

» MORE
 
Post a comment
Write a comment:

Related Searches