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Short Walks Protect Against Diabetes

Posted Jul 11 2013 10:08pm
Posted on July 8, 2013, 6 a.m. in Diabetes Exercise
Short Walks Protect Against Diabetes

With an estimated 79 million Americans have pre-diabetes but showing no signs, health experts explore inexpensive preventive strategies that may help to prevent the development of type-2 diabetes.  High post-meal blood sugar is a strong determinant of excessive 24-hour glucose levels, and research suggests that people who eat a big afternoon or evening meal and often then are sedentary for the remainder of the day, are at-risk for rapid blood sugar spikes that can potentially cause damage.  Loretta DiPietro, from George Washington University School of Public Health & Health Services (Washington DC, USA), and colleagues enrolled ten men and women, ages 60 years and older, who were otherwise healthy but at risk of developing type 2 diabetes due to higher-than-normal levels of fasting blood sugar and to insufficient levels of physical activity. Subjects completed three randomly-ordered exercise protocols spaced four weeks apart. Each protocol comprised a 48-hour stay in a whole-room calorimeter, with the first day serving as a control period. On the second day, participants engaged in either post-meal walking for 15 minutes after each meal or 45 minutes of sustained walking performed at 10:30 in the morning or at 4:30 in the afternoon. All walking was performed on a treadmill at an easy-to-moderate pace. Participants ate standardized meals and their blood sugar levels were measured continuously over each 48 hour stay.  The researchers observed that the most effective time to go for a post-meal walk was after the evening meal. The exaggerated rise in blood sugar after this mealoften the largest of the dayoften lasts well into the night and early morning and this was curbed significantly as soon as the participants started to walk on the treadmill.  The study authors write that: “Short, intermittent bouts of postmeal walking appear to be an effective way to control postprandial hyperglycemia in older people.”

Loretta DiPietro, Andrei Gribok, Michelle S. Stevens, Larry F. Hamm, William Rumpler.  “Three 15-min Bouts of Moderate Postmeal Walking Significantly Improves 24-h Glycemic Control in Older People at Risk for Impaired Glucose Tolerance.”  Diabetes Care, June 11, 2013.

  
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Tip #187 - Milk The Benefits
Dairy and dairy products have been studied extensively for their promising health benefits:

• Combat Heart Disease & Stroke: University of Reading (United Kingdom) researchers studied findings from 324 studies of milk consumption as predictors of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke and, diabetes. Data on milk consumption and cancer were based on the recent World Cancer Research Fund report. The team found that drinking milk can lessen the chances of dying from illnesses such as coronary heart disease and stroke by up to 15-20%. Separately, researchers from Bristol University (United Kingdom) studied data from the Carnegie (“Boyd Orr”) survey of diet and health in pre-war Britain. Tracking the lives and the dairy intake of 4,374 children between 1948 and 2005, the researchers found that 1,468 (34%) of them had died, and 378 of those deaths were caused by coronary heart disease and 121 were due to stroke. Not only did the study suggest that dairy rich diets in childhood do not contribute to heart problems later, the team found that higher childhood calcium intake was associated with lower stroke mortality. In addition, children who were in the group that had the highest calcium intake and dairy product consumption were found to have lower mortality rates than those in the lower intake groups.

• Maintain Cognitive Health: Researchers from the University of Oxford (United Kingdom) studied whether foods rich in Vitamin B-12 might counter homocysteine, a compound for which high levels are linked to an increased risk of heart disease and cognitive decline including Alzheimer's Disease. The team monitored 5,937 subjects in two age groups (47-49 years, and 71-74 years) participating in the Hordaland Homocysteine Study in Norway, surveying them for their daily food intake patterns. The team observed that those subjects with low B-12 levels suffered twice as much brain shrinkage as compared to those study participants with higher blood levels of the vitamin. The researchers observed two glasses of skim milk daily can help that raise plasma vitamin B-12 levels.
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