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Rosemary Spice May Support Metabolic Syndrome

Posted Mar 29 2013 10:11pm
Posted on March 28, 2013, 6 a.m. in Metabolic Syndrome Functional Foods

Characterized by central obesity, hypertension, and adverse glucose and insulin metabolism, Metabolic Syndrome is a condition associated with increased risk of type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.  Zheng Tu, from the McCormick & Accompany Technical Innovation Center (Maryland, USA), and colleagues investigated the effects of different concentrations of Rosemary extract on the metabolism of liver cells. Employing a laboratory animal model, the team found that that glucose consumption increased in a dose-dependent ratio to the concentration of Rosemary extract applied. At the highest dose of Rosemary extract, glucose consumption was reduced by 21%. The researchers conclude that: “Overall, our study suggested that rosemary potentially increases liver glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation by activating [fatty acid and glucose metabolism] pathways.”

Zheng Tu, Tijuana Moss-Pierce, Paul Ford, T. Alan Jiang. “Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) Extract Regulates Glucose and Lipid Metabolism by Activating AMPK and PPAR Pathways in HepG2 Cells." J. Agric. Food Chem., February 22, 2013.

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Tip #141 - Men – Get Moving
Previous studies have suggested that physical activity decreases the risk of certain cancers. University of California, Los Angeles (USA) researchers have found that men who work in jobs that require a continuous level of high physical effort are at reduced risks of developing prostate cancer. The team compared the physical activity of 392 workers who developed prostate cancer with 1,805 men similarly employed and of similar age. Amongst a group of aerospace workers, 64% of whom were involved in work that required sustained and high levels of physical activity, the odds for prostate cancer were 45% lower, as compared to their less active counterparts.

Don’t underestimate the health benefits of physical activity, be it leisure-time exercise, competitive sports, or at-work exertion. Check with your anti-aging physician to make sure the level of your physical activity is appropriate for your medical needs.
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