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Rift Valley Fever in Sudan

Posted Jun 13 2009 12:32am

WHO has confirmed that an outbreak in Sudan, originally thought to be Yellow Fever is actually Rift Valley Fever.  Areas named included: White
Nile, Sennar, and Jazeera provinces in central and eastern Sudan

Promed had some information from Reuters about this and cited 60 dead and 125 cases. 

Rift Valley Fever

Basics: A febrile viral illness, similiar to west nile virus, this generally is self-limiting and lasts approximately one week. Fever, headache and malaise are common. Rift Valley Fever is a phlebovirus. May occasionally progress to hemorrhagic complications similiar to Dengue.

Location: Central Africa and as of 2000, Arabian Peninsula.

Transmission/Incubation: Acquired either from handling blood or animals infected with RVF or being bitten by mosquitoes who carry RVF.

Prevention: Prevention of mosquito bites with DEET spray, permethrin treated nets and clothing, avoidance of dawn and dusk biting times.

Diagnosis: Culture and growth of virus in mice

Treatment: Supportive care including fever reduction, pain control and IV fluids/drips for hemorrhagic complications.

Filed under: Outbreaks and Updates, Travel Health | Tagged: adventure doc, outbreak, rift valley fever, sudan, travel medicine

WHO has confirmed that an outbreak in Sudan, originally thought to be Yellow Fever is actually Rift Valley Fever.  Areas named included: White
Nile, Sennar, and Jazeera provinces in central and eastern Sudan

Promed had some information from Reuters about this and cited 60 dead and 125 cases. 

Rift Valley Fever

Basics: A febrile viral illness, similiar to west nile virus, this generally is self-limiting and lasts approximately one week. Fever, headache and malaise are common. Rift Valley Fever is a phlebovirus. May occasionally progress to hemorrhagic complications similiar to Dengue.

Location: Central Africa and as of 2000, Arabian Peninsula.

Transmission/Incubation: Acquired either from handling blood or animals infected with RVF or being bitten by mosquitoes who carry RVF.

Prevention: Prevention of mosquito bites with DEET spray, permethrin treated nets and clothing, avoidance of dawn and dusk biting times.

Diagnosis: Culture and growth of virus in mice

Treatment: Supportive care including fever reduction, pain control and IV fluids/drips for hemorrhagic complications.

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