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Resveratrol Supports Vascular Health

Posted Nov 19 2012 10:08pm

Resveratrol, an antioxidant compound found abundantly in red wine and red grapes, exerts beneficial effects on the body’s circulatory function. Peter Howe, from University of South Australia (Australia), and colleagues studied a group of 28 obese men and women with mild hypertension (high blood pressure), who were given a daily supplement of 75mg resveratrol.  After six weeks, the researchers observed that vasodilator functions, as measured by flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), improved by 23%.  The study authors explain that FMD is an accepted parameter for the risk of cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline.

Howe et al.  Presented at 24th Scientific Meeting of International Society of Hypertension, 22 Oct. 2012.

  
The precepts of the anti-aging lifestyle – including healthy diet, exercise, and not smoking – help people to maintain physical and cogn
Vascular health, and thereby cardiac and cognitive functioning, may benefit from supplementation with the antioxidant compound found in red wine and red grapes.
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#75 - Broccoli on the Brain
Broccoli is high in lignans, a phytoestrogen compound that has been shown to benefit cognitive kills (thinking, reasoning, remembering, imagining, and learning words. A 2005 study by researchers at King's College London (United Kingdom) revealed that broccoli also is high in glucosinolates, a group of compounds that can halt the decline of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, which is necessary for the central nervous system to perform properly (low levels of acetylcholine are common in those with Alzheimer's Disease)...
 
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