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Ozone Levels Linked to Cardiac Arrest

Posted Mar 13 2013 10:25pm
Posted on March 11, 2013, 6 a.m. in Environment Cardio-Vascular

Researchers at Rice University (Texas, USA) reveal a direct correlation between out-of-hospital cardiac arrests and levels of air pollution and ozone.  Katherine Ensor and colleagues  analyzed eight years' worth of data drawn from the city of Houston's (Texas, USA) extensive network of air-quality monitors and more than 11,000 concurrent out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) logged by Houston Emergency Medical Services (EMS). They found a positive correlation between OHCAs and exposure to both fine particulate matter (airborne particles smaller than 2.5 micrograms) and ozone.   Specifically, the team found that a daily average increase in particulate matter of 6 micrograms per day over two days raised the risk of OHCA by 4.6%, with particular impact on those with pre-existing (and not necessarily cardiac-related) health conditions. Increases in ozone level were similar, but on a shorter timescale: Each increase of 20 parts per billion over one to three hours also increased OHCA risk, with a peak of 4.4%. Peak-time risks from both pollutants rose as high as 4.6%.  Observing that Relative Risks were higher for men, African-Americans and people over 65, the study authors warn that: “The findings confirm the link between OHCA and [fine particulate matter] and introduce evidence of a similar link with ozone.”

Ensor KB, Raun LH, Persse D.  “A Case-Crossover Analysis of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Air Pollution.”  Circulation. 2013 Feb 13.

  
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Tip #134 - “C” the Way to Lower Stroke Risk
A ten-year long European study involving 20,649 men and women found that increased blood levels of Vitamin C reduce the risk of stroke by 42%. University of Cambridge (United Kingdom) researchers revealed that both consumption of Vitamin C-rich foods and dietary vitamin supplements were equivalent in providing stroke-reducing benefits. They found that an optimal blood level of Vitamin C was reached after study subjects ingested five servings of fruits and vegetables.

A potent antioxidant that protects against free radical cellular damage, Vitamin C is found in abundantly in citrus fruit and juices, strawberries, blueberries, rose hips, cantaloupes, tomatoes, and red bell peppers.

Because Vitamin C is easily destroyed by cooking, opt to eat your fruits and vegetables raw. As well, because Vitamin C levels drop as foods are stored, buy as is locally available and consume immediately after purchase.
 
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