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Omega-3s Hold Promise for Breast Cancer

Posted Apr 30 2013 10:07pm
Posted on April 30, 2013, 6 a.m. in Women's Health Cancer Fatty Acids, Lipids & Oils

Omega-3 fatty acids are found in oily fish like sardines and salmon, and also in oils derived from plants like flax. Previous studies suggest these compounds can negatively affect critical mechanisms in cancer cells, namely those responsible for proliferation and for apoptosis, or programmed cell death. Thomas J. Pogash, from  Fox Chase Cancer Center (Pennsylvania, USA), and colleagues tested the effect of large omega-3 parent molecules, as well as their smaller metabolic derivatives, on three luminal cell lines and seven lines that included basal-type triple-negative cells.  Omega-3 and its metabolites were observed to inhibit proliferation in all cell lines, but the effect was dramatically more pronounced in the triple-negative cell lines. In addition, the metabolites of omega-3 reduced the motility by 20-60%in the triple-negative basal cell lines.  The study authors submit that: “Our data provide novel information regarding the preferential antitumor effect of [Omega-3 fatty acids] and its metabolites on basal type breast cancer.”

Thomas J. Pogash, Ricardo Lopez de Cicco, Benjamin Pressly, Irma H. Russo, Julie A. Himmelberger, Jose Russo, et al.  “Polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids and their metabolites preferentially inhibit cell proliferation and motility in triple negative over luminal breast cancer cells” [Abstract  2600/30].”  Presented at American Association for Cancer Research 2013 Annual Meeting, 9 April 2013.

  
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Omega-3 fatty acids and their metabolite products may slow or stop the proliferation of triple-negative breast cancer cells by as much as 90%
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Tip #155 - “D” feat Depression
Whereas the therapeutic role of vitamin D, “the sunshine vitamin,” for bone health, has become well established, some studies suggest that vitamin D deficiencies may contribute to cancer, cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, and some infectious diseases. Researchers from Vrije Universiteit Medical Center (The Netherlands) report a link between insufficient Vitamin D and increased risk of depression. Studying 1,282 men and women, ages 65 to 95 years, the team found that subjects with major and minor depression had blood vitamin D levels 14% lower than participants who were not depressive.

Roll up your sleeves and enjoy the outdoors for up to 10 minutes a day, Doing so will help your body to produce natural stores of vitamin D.

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