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Olive Oil & Nuts Help to Reduce Heart Attack, Stroke Risks

Posted Mar 13 2013 10:25pm

Previously, a number of studies have shown that adherence to a Mediterranean diet – rich in olive oil, nuts, as w ell as fruits, vegetables, and legumes, and limited amounts of dairy products, red meat, soda drinks, processed meats, and sweets – inversely associates with cardiovascular risks.  Ramon Estruch, from Hospital Clinic (Spain), and colleagues   enrolled 7,447 men and women, ages 55 to 80 years, who were free of cardiovascular disease at the study’s start but either had diabetes or at least three cardiovascular risk factors (smoking, high blood pressure, or obesity), to consume either a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil, a Mediterranean diet supplemented with mixed nuts, or a control diet (advice to reduce dietary fat). All subjects received quarterly individual and group educational sessions.  After a median follow-up of 4.8 years, 288 participants had a primary endpoint event, including 96 (3.8%) in the olive-oil group, 83 (3.4%) in the mixed-nut group, and 109 (4.4%) in the control group.  In a multivariable analysis, the olive-oil diet led to a 28% reduction in risk, compared with the control diet; with the mixed nut diet exerting similar risk reduction.  The study authors conclude that: “Among persons at high cardiovascular risk, a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil or nuts reduced the incidence of major cardiovascular events.”

Estruch R, Ros E, Salas-Salvado J, Covas MI, D Pharm, Corella D, Martínez-Gonzalez MA, et al.; the PREDIMED Study Investigators.  “Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease with a Mediterranean Diet.”  N Engl J Med. 2013 Feb 25.

  
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Tip #134 - “C” the Way to Lower Stroke Risk
A ten-year long European study involving 20,649 men and women found that increased blood levels of Vitamin C reduce the risk of stroke by 42%. University of Cambridge (United Kingdom) researchers revealed that both consumption of Vitamin C-rich foods and dietary vitamin supplements were equivalent in providing stroke-reducing benefits. They found that an optimal blood level of Vitamin C was reached after study subjects ingested five servings of fruits and vegetables.

A potent antioxidant that protects against free radical cellular damage, Vitamin C is found in abundantly in citrus fruit and juices, strawberries, blueberries, rose hips, cantaloupes, tomatoes, and red bell peppers.

Because Vitamin C is easily destroyed by cooking, opt to eat your fruits and vegetables raw. As well, because Vitamin C levels drop as foods are stored, buy as is locally available and consume immediately after purchase.
 
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