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Olive Oil Nourishes Brain Cells

Posted Apr 06 2013 10:09pm

Alzheimer’s Disease is a neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by accumulation of beta-amyloid and tau proteins in the brain.  Oleocanthal is a phenolic component found abundantly in extra-virgin olive oil; some previous studies suggest that the compound may exert neuroprotective effects.  Amal Kaddoumi, from the University of Louisiana (Louisiana, USA), and colleagues completed in vitro and in vivo studies that demonstrate the ability for oleocanthal to two proteins- P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and LDL lipoprotein receptor related protein-1 (LRP1) – as well as key enzymes believed to be critical in removing beta-amyloid from the brain. The study investigators conclude that: “these findings provide experimental support that potential reduced risk of AD associated with extra-virgin olive oil could be mediated by enhancement of [beta-amyloid] clearance from the brain.”

Alaa H. Abuznait, Hisham Qosa, Belnaser A. Busnena, Khalid A. El Sayed, Amal Kaddoumi.  “Olive-Oil-Derived Oleocanthal Enhances [beta]-Amyloid Clearance as a Potential Neuroprotective Mechanism against Alzheimer’s Disease: In Vitro and in Vivo Studies.”  ACS Chem. Neurosci., February 15, 2013.

  
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Tip #144 - Veggies Vex Diabetes
Type-2 diabetes affects upwards of 5% of the world’s population, and the number of cases is projected to rise in the coming decades, due to factors such as aging, obesity, and the pervasiveness of a sedentary lifestyle. Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center (Tennessee, USA) researchers followed 64,000 women residing in China, ages 40 to 70 years, for nearly 5 years, assessing their daily fruit and vegetable intakes and tracking the onset of diabetes. Those women who consumed the most vegetables -- averaging 428 grams, or 15 ounces, daily – were at 28% lower risk of developing the disease.

Researchers from Addenbrooke's Hospital (United Kingdom) followed 21,831 men and women, ages 40 to 75 years at the study’s start, for a 12-year period. The team found that men and women with the highest blood levels of vitamin C (reflecting a high fruit and vegetable intake) were at 62% reduced risk of developing type-2 diabetes, as compared to those with the lowest blood levels.

Not only rich sources of fiber, antioxidants, and magnesium, vegetables contain diabetes-reducing compounds such as phytates, lignans, and isoflavones. While the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) recommends that women ages 19-50 years consume 2 ½ cups of veggies daily, and men ages 19-50 years consume 3 cups daily, anti-aging physicians recommend doubling those amounts. » MORE
 
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