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Mercury Exposure May Raise Diabetes Risk

Posted Apr 30 2013 10:07pm
Posted on April 29, 2013, 6 a.m. in Environment Diabetes

While fish and shellfish also contain lean protein and other nutrients, such as magnesium and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, these foods are also a main source of mercury exposure. Ka He, from Indiana University (Indiana, USA), and colleagues  studied 3,875 American young adults, ages 20–32 years, who were free of diabetes at the study’s start in 1987 and were followed six times until 2005. Baseline toenail mercury levels were measured and incident diabetes was identified.   The team found that higher levels of mercury exposure in young adults increased their risks for type 2 diabetes later in life by 65%.  Reporting that: “Our results are consistent with findings from laboratory studies,” the study authors submit that they: “provide longitudinal human data, suggesting that people with high mercury exposure in young adulthood may have elevated risk of diabetes later in life."

Ka He, Pengcheng Xun, Kiang Liu, Steve Morris, Jared Reis, Eliseo Guallar.  “Mercury Exposure in Young Adulthood and Incidence of Diabetes Later in Life: The CARDIA trace element study.”  Diabetes Care, February 19, 2013.

  
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Tip #155 - “D” feat Depression
Whereas the therapeutic role of vitamin D, “the sunshine vitamin,” for bone health, has become well established, some studies suggest that vitamin D deficiencies may contribute to cancer, cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, and some infectious diseases. Researchers from Vrije Universiteit Medical Center (The Netherlands) report a link between insufficient Vitamin D and increased risk of depression. Studying 1,282 men and women, ages 65 to 95 years, the team found that subjects with major and minor depression had blood vitamin D levels 14% lower than participants who were not depressive.

Roll up your sleeves and enjoy the outdoors for up to 10 minutes a day, Doing so will help your body to produce natural stores of vitamin D.

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