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Lower Glycemic Load to Lower Diabetes Risk

Posted Sep 09 2013 10:07pm
Posted on Sept. 6, 2013, 6 a.m. in Diabetes Diet
Lower Glycemic Load to Lower Diabetes Risk

Previously, a number of studies have shown that adherence to a Mediterranean diet – rich in olive oil, nuts, as well as fruits, vegetables, and legumes, and limited amounts of dairy products, red meat, soda drinks, processed meats, and sweets – inversely associates with cardiovascular risks.    Italian researchers report that following the traditional Mediterranean diet and limiting high glycemic load foods such as those high in refined sugars and grains may reduce a person’s risk of type-2 diabetes. Carlo La Vecchia, from the Mario Negri Institute of Pharmacological Research (Italy), and colleagues examined data collected on 22,295 study subjects who resided in Greece and participated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) trial.  Over 11 years of follow-up, 2,330 cases of type 2 diabetes were identified.  The researchers observed that those subjects adhering closely to the Mediterranean diet were at lower risks of developing type-2 diabetes.  Glycemic load was positively associated with a lower risk for diabetes for the highest versus the lowest glycemic load quartile.

Rossi M, et al. "Mediterranean diet and glycaemic load in relation to incidence of type 2 diabetes: results from the Greek cohort of the population-based European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC).” Diabetologia 2013; DOI: 10.1007/s00125-013-3013-y.

  
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Anti-Aging Forum MLDP Join A4M
Tip #192 - Stay Connected
Researchers from the University of Chicago (Illinois, USA) report that social isolation may be detrimental to both mental and physical health. The team analyzed data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project, a nationwide US study involving 3,000 men and women, ages 57 to 85 years. They arrived at three key findings regarding the relationships between health and different types of isolation:

• The researchers found that the most socially connected older adults are three times as likely to report very good or excellent health compared to those who are least connected, regardless of whether they feel isolated.

• The team found that older adults who feel least isolated are five times as likely to report very good or excellent health as those who feel most isolated, regardless of their actual level of social connectedness.

• They determined that social disconnectedness is not related to mental health unless it brings feelings of loneliness and isolation.

Separately, Rush University Medical Center (Illinois, USA) researchers studied 906 older men and women, testing their motor functions (including grip, pinch strength, balance, and walking) and surveying their social activity, for a period of 5 years. Those study participants with less social activity were found to have a more rapid rate of motor function decline. Specifically, the team found that every one-point decrease in social activity corresponded to an increase in functional aging of 5 years, translating to a 40% higher risk of death and 65% higher risk of disability.

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