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L’Oréal Majicontrast – Which Ingredient Lightens Colored Hair?

Posted May 05 2012 2:01am

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Fancyvi says…Normal haircolours can’t lighten up coloured hair, as peroxide brought the pigments together and can’t split them up afterwards. Which ingredient helps Majicontrast to do so? It’s obviously a haircolour and not like Magma a bleaching product. I already checked the ingredients and couldn’t find out how the product does it.

The Right Brain responds:

Well Fancy, you’ve certainly picked an obscure product to ask about because we haven’t been able to find out much about Majicontrast. The L’Oreal website gives virtually no information, probably because the product is designed for professionals and they want consumers to go to their colorist with questions.  But on eBay , of all places, we did discover that this product requires mixing with either 6, 9 or 12% peroxide depending on the level of lift required.  (That’s why peroxide doesn’t show up on the ingredient list, because you have to use a separate peroxide solution.) We couldn’t find a full ingredient list online so I’m including the list you provided in the Forum (I’m assuming you got this off the package.):

AQUA; CETEARYL ALCOHOL; AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE; OLETH 30, HEXADIMETHRINE CLORIDE; OLEIC ACID; OLEYL ALCOHOL; ETHANOLAMINE; PENTASODIUM PENTETATE; 2-OLEAMIDO-1,3-OCTADECANEDIOL; BASIC RED 51; PARFUM Resorcin; Toluylendiamin; Phenylendiamine and Ammonia.

Apparently Majicontrast only lifts (or lightens) a little bit of your hair color which is enough that you can lay down a redder, more vibrant color on top of dark hair. The lifting is accomplished by the peroxide solution. That brings me to an important point of clarification: in your question you said that peroxide can’t lighten hair because it “brings pigments together not brings them apart.”

That’s not really technically accurate. Peroxide functions as an oxidizing agent. At high concentrations (and at high pH) it will oxidize existing color in your hair, breaking it down and making it lighter. It can also oxidize individual dye molecules (called monomers) causing them to form long chains (called polymers). These polymers, formed inside your hair, are what create the new hair color. So you see, peroxide can both color and de-color hair depending on what it’s reacting with.

You can read this article on how ammonia free haircolor works to give you some additional perspective: How Does Ammonia Free Hair Color Work?

If anyone finds any additional information on Majicontrast let us know and we’ll update this post.

Image credit: http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2545/3974563382_9cf96e3255_o.jpg

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