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Improved Bacterial Host for Production of Anthrax Toxin Proteins and Vaccines: Bacillus anthracis BH450

Posted Aug 31 2008 5:00pm

Description of Invention:
Anthrax toxin has previously been made from various avirulent strains of Bacillus anthracis. The inventors have genetically engineered a new strain of B. anthracis with improved properties. The strain, designated BH450, is totally deficient in the ability to make spores and to produce a major extracellular protease designated Peptidase M4. The genetic lesions introduced are defined, true deletions, so there is no possibility of reversion. Inability to make spores assures that laboratories growing the strain will not become contaminated with the very stable anthrax spores. Inability to make peptidase M4 increases the stability of proteins such as anthrax toxin that are secreted to the culture medium.

Applications:
B. anthracis vaccine/prophylactic and therapeutic studies.

Development Status:
The technology is a research tool.

Inventors:
Andrei P Pomerantsev (NIAID)
Stephen H Leppla (NIAID)
Dana S Hsu (NIAID)


Patent Status:
Research Tool

Relevant Publication:
  1. AP Pomerantsev et al. Genome engineering in Bacillus anthracis using Cre recombinase. Infect Immun. 2006 Jan;74(1):682-693. [ PubMed abs ]


Licensing Status:
This technology is not patented. The strain will be transferred through a Biological Materials License.

Collaborative Research Opportunity:
The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Laboratory of Bacterial Diseases, is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize Bacillus anthracis BH450 strain. Please contact Dr. Andrei P. Pomerantsev at phone 301-451-9817 and/or email apomerantsev@niaid.nih.gov for more information.


Portfolios:
Infectious Diseases
Infectious Diseases - Diagnostics
Infectious Diseases - Vaccines
Infectious Diseases - Research Materials
Rare Diseases



For Additional Information Please Contact:
Peter Soukas J.D.
NIH Office of Technology Transfer
6011 Executive Blvd. Suite 325 Room 14,
Rockville, MD 20852-3804
United States
Email: soukasp@mail.nih.gov
Phone: 301-435-4646
Fax: 301-402-0220


Ref No: 1599

Updated: 09/2008

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