Health knowledge made personal
Join this community!
› Share page:
Go
Search posts:

Healthy Diet Helps Prevent Future Heart Attack

Posted Dec 29 2012 10:07pm
Posted on Dec. 26, 2012, 6 a.m. in Cardio-Vascular Diet
Healthy Diet Helps Prevent Future Heart Attack

In that diet quality is strongly related to cardiovascular disease incidence, researchers involved in two clinical studies involving a total of 31,546 men and women, average age 66.5 years, sought to elucidate the role of diet on future cardiovascular events in people at-risk and receiving medication for secondary prevention.  The research group reported that their analysis of two cohorts of patients with cardiovascular disease or diabetes showed that subjects who consumed the healthiest diet had a significantly lower risk of further cardiovascular events, as compared to those whose ate the poorest quality diet.  The benefits were seen regardless of the type of medications that patients were taking. Writing that: “A higher-quality diet was associated with a lower risk of recurrent [cardiovascular disease] events among people 55 years of age [and older] with [cardiovascular disease] or diabetes mellitus,” the study authors urge that: “Highlighting the importance of healthy eating by health professionals would substantially reduce [cardiovascular disease] recurrence and save lives globally.”

Dehghan M, Mente A, Teo KK, Gao P, Sleight P, Dagenais G, et al; on Behalf of the Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination With Ramipril Global End Point Trial (ONTARGET)/Telmisartan Randomized Assessment Study in ACEI Intolerant Subjects With Cardiovascular Disease (TRANSCEND) Trial Investigators.  “Relationship Between Healthy Diet and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Among Patients on Drug Therapies for Secondary Prevention: A Prospective Cohort Study of 31 546 High-Risk Individuals From 40 Countries.” Circulation. 2012 Dec 4;126(23):2705-2712.

  
World Congress on Anti-Aging Medicine & Regenerative Biomedical Technologies Showcases Innovations in Clinical Aging Intervention:
Daily supplementation of aged garlic extract helps to reduce blood pressure, in people with uncontrolled systolic hypertension.
Most American homes have levels of at least one flame retardant that exceed a federal health guideline.
Three to four cups of coffee per day may help to prevent type 2 diabetes.
A person’s risk of heart attack increases incrementally, and may be elevated within the first year of unemployment.
People with known cardiovascular disease, or diabetes with end-organ effects, are at a lower risk if they consume a healthy diet.
Triclosan, an antibacterial chemical found in numerous personal care products, may contribute to an increased risk of allergy development in children.
To maintain healthy weight at the holidays, think twice before reaching for traditional staples like cookies or candy – and the car keys.
Mercury released into the air and then deposited into oceans contaminates seafood eaten by people worldwide.
Higher vitamin D dietary intake associates with a lower risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, among women.
A person’s risk of heart attack increases incrementally, and may be elevated within the first year of unemployment.
Fifteen new genetic regions associated with coronary artery disease have been identified by a large, international consortium of scientists.
Canadian team transforms aged stem cells into cardiac tissue.
When estimating cardiovascular disease risk, Swiss team reports that body mass index (BMI) is a more accurate predictor than cholesterol levels.
Daily supplements of curcumin may match exercise, in relation to cardiovascular health benefits among postmenopausal women.
Long-term exposure to fine particulate matter decreases flow-mediated brachial artery dilation.
Men who have Metabolic Syndrome may be at increased risk of diagnosis and death from prostate cancer.
Produced with high-temperature cooking such as grilling, advanced glycation end products (AGEs) may worsen heart issues often seen as complications of diabetes.
Found in green leafy vegetables, increased consumption of phylloquinone (Vitamin K1) may lower the risk of developing type-2 diabetes by as much as 51%.
Sitting for protracted periods of time increases risk of diabetes, heart disease, and death.
Anti-Aging Forum MLDP Join A4M
#97 - Be a Social Butterfly
Social and productive activities provide equivalent advantages to staying alive as do physical fitness activities. Harvard Medical School researchers found that people with a chronic medical condition that makes physical exertion difficult may greatly benefit from participating in social activities. Spend an afternoon tea with your friends, play bridge on Friday night, or have an impromptu get-together with neighbors. When you spend quality time with those who share your interests, you establish the basis for a social network that helps you to maintain a positive outlook on life.
 
Post a comment
Write a comment:

Related Searches