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Health Consequences of Secondhand Tobacco Smoke

Posted Mar 29 2013 10:11pm
Posted on March 26, 2013, 6 a.m. in Environment Cardio-Vascular

Coronary artery calcification, a build-up of calcium in the artery walls as seen on a low-dose computed tomography scan, is a marker of heart disease.   Harvey Hecht, from Mount Sinai Medical Center (New York, USA), and colleagues found that 26% of people exposed to varying levels of secondhand smoke exhibited signs of coronary artery calcification, as compared to 18.5% in the general population. As well, people who report higher levels of secondhand tobacco smoke exposure also have the greatest evidence of coronary artery calcification. The lead researcher comments that: "This research provides additional evidence that secondhand smoke is harmful and may be even more dangerous than we previously thought … We actually found the risk of secondhand smoke exposure to be an equivalent or stronger risk factor [for coronary artery calcification] than other well-established ones such as high cholesterol, hypertension and diabetes. Passive exposure to smoke seems to independently predict both the likelihood and extent of [coronary artery calcification]."

Harvey S. Hecht, David Yankelewitz, Claudia Henschke, Rowena Yip, Paolo Boffetta, Shemesh Shemesh, Matthew Cham, Jagat Narula.  “Secondhand Tobacco Smoke in Never Smokers Is A Significant Risk Factor for Coronary Artery Calcification."  Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 61, Issue 10, Supplement, 12 March 2013, Page E1422.

  
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Anti-Aging Forum MLDP Join A4M
Tip #141 - Men – Get Moving
Previous studies have suggested that physical activity decreases the risk of certain cancers. University of California, Los Angeles (USA) researchers have found that men who work in jobs that require a continuous level of high physical effort are at reduced risks of developing prostate cancer. The team compared the physical activity of 392 workers who developed prostate cancer with 1,805 men similarly employed and of similar age. Amongst a group of aerospace workers, 64% of whom were involved in work that required sustained and high levels of physical activity, the odds for prostate cancer were 45% lower, as compared to their less active counterparts.

Don’t underestimate the health benefits of physical activity, be it leisure-time exercise, competitive sports, or at-work exertion. Check with your anti-aging physician to make sure the level of your physical activity is appropriate for your medical needs.
 
 
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