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Hazards of BPA Substitute

Posted Feb 05 2013 10:08pm
Posted on Feb. 4, 2013, 6 a.m. in Environment

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a man-made chemical present in a variety of products including food containers, receipt paper and dental sealants and is now widely detected in human urine and blood. Public health concerns have been fueled by findings that BPA exposure can influence brain development. In mice, prenatal exposure to BPA is associated with increased anxiety, aggression and cognitive impairments.  In response to public pressure, industry has begun to replace BPA with Bisphenol S (BPS). Cheryl S. Watson, from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (Texas, USA), and colleagues conducted cell-culture experiments to examine the effects of BPS on a form of signaling that involves estrogen receptors the "receivers" of a biochemical message acting in the cell's outer membrane instead of the cell nucleus. Where nuclear signaling involves interaction with DNA to produce proteins and requires hours to days, membrane signaling (also called "non-genomic" signaling) acts through much quicker mechanisms, generating a response in seconds or minutes.  Focusing on key biochemical pathways that are normally stimulated when estrogen activates membrane receptor, the researchers observed that BPS disrupts cellular responses to the hormone estrogen, changing patterns of cell growth and death and hormone release. Also like BPA, it does so at extremely low levels of exposure.  Reporting that: “Our studies show that BPS is active at femtomolar to picomolar concentrations just like endogenous hormones that's in the range of parts per trillion to quadrillion," the lead investigator warns that: “Those are levels likely to be produced by BPS leaching from containers into their contents."

Rene Vinas, Cheryl S. Watson. “Bisphenol S Disrupts Estradiol-Induced Nongenomic Signaling in a Rat Pituitary Cell Line: Effects on Cell Functions.” Environmental Health Perspectives, January 17, 2013.

  
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#117 - 117 – A Healthy Gum-ption
Enjoy these foods and beverages that have been shown to promote good oral health:

• Green tea: University of Illinois-Chicago (USA) researchers found that drinking green tea reduced the number of bacteria in the mouth that cause bad breath. In a separate study, Pace University (USA) scientists found that flavorids, a compound in green tea, work with the germ killers in toothpaste and mouthwash, boosting their effectiveness at warding off viruses and preventing cavities.

• Black tea: A study by the Vivekananda Institute (India) reported in 2005 that people who drank black tea for one year had a reduced risk of developing oral cancer.

• Cranberry juice: Researchers at the University of Rochester (USA) have shown that cranberry juice helps to stop bacteria from sticking to teeth, thereby preventing the formation of plaque (the cause of tooth decay and gum disease). Separate research by a team at University of Illinois-Chicago (USA) found that cranberry juice interfered with the viability and growth of oral pathogens.

• Raisins: In 2005, University of Illinois-Chicago (USA) researchers found that two compounds in raisins were successful in fighting bacteria in the mouth that cause cavities and gum disease.
 
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