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G-Tube Recipes – What NOT to Include

Posted Aug 07 2009 7:16pm

When feeding blended meals via g-tube for medical reasons, there are some foods to avoid. I have found that cruciferous vegetables are not storage friendly. This includes broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage, kale, bok choy, and turnip greens. Onions and beans  are also trouble makers, in my experience. 

Cruciferous vegetables tend to produce gas due to the indigestible sugar found in them called raffinose. Beans have even MORE raffinose than cruciferous vegetables. My best guess as to why these vegetables cause gas so quickly in my daughter is that by blending the recipes, the enzymes in the various foods catalyze the breakdown of the foods. If I store a blended meal in the refrigerator for only ONE day, she feels gas pains by the second or third syringe of food. So my practice is to only include these foods when I am going to blend and immediately feed. 

These cruciferous vegetables are very nutritious and as such are good to feed your child. Bacteria in the colon that produce methane feed on raffinose and release gas in the process. So if you regularly feed your child buttermilk or yogurt it may increase the friendly bacteria in the colon and reduce this effect.  Probiotic supplements can also be very helpful, as can Beano.  Beano is a plant-derived enzyme that breaks down raffinose before it enters the colon, reducing gas. It can be purchased in many grocery stores. 

If I am planning to store blended meals, I do not include these gas-producing foods.  If I am cooking for the family and use that food for Little Miss right away, then I DO include them.

When feeding blended meals via g-tube for medical reasons, there are some foods to avoid. I have found that cruciferous vegetables are not storage friendly. This includes broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage, kale, bok choy, and turnip greens. Onions and beans  are also trouble makers, in my experience. 

Cruciferous vegetables tend to produce gas due to the indigestible sugar found in them called raffinose. Beans have even MORE raffinose than cruciferous vegetables. My best guess as to why these vegetables cause gas so quickly in my daughter is that by blending the recipes, the enzymes in the various foods catalyze the breakdown of the foods. If I store a blended meal in the refrigerator for only ONE day, she feels gas pains by the second or third syringe of food. So my practice is to only include these foods when I am going to blend and immediately feed. 

These cruciferous vegetables are very nutritious and as such are good to feed your child. Bacteria in the colon that produce methane feed on raffinose and release gas in the process. So if you regularly feed your child buttermilk or yogurt it may increase the friendly bacteria in the colon and reduce this effect.  Probiotic supplements can also be very helpful, as can Beano.  Beano is a plant-derived enzyme that breaks down raffinose before it enters the colon, reducing gas. It can be purchased in many grocery stores. 

If I am planning to store blended meals, I do not include these gas-producing foods.  If I am cooking for the family and use that food for Little Miss right away, then I DO include them.

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