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G-Tube Feeding on Recent Travels

Posted Aug 07 2009 7:16pm

Traveling with our special needs princess who is fed by g-tube for medical reasons can be quite an adventure in endurance!

Our recent trip went very well, despite the fact that I forgot a few things.

One of the adjustments to our traveling paraphernalia was the addition of paper plates! As you can see in the photos below, I use them for both resting the tube and syringe as well as keeping track of how many syringe-fulls I’ve given.

after feeding three syringes, it looks like this

after feeding three syringes, it looks like this

at the end of feeding it looks like this

at the end of feeding it looks like this

Here’s a closer look at how I notate the process:

denotes minutes on the clock and the hash marks are the syringes-given

numbers denote minutes on the clock and hash marks denote number of syringes given

After several years of giving feedings via g-tube, it becomes mindless. I quickly forget how many syringes I’ve given and when.  At home, I use the kitchen timer and the wall calendar to keep track of when and how many.

On a trip, I mark both the time given (minutes only) and the number of syringes given on the paper plate. Afterwards, I can just throw it away!

I also took an 8″ diameter plastic bowl along and dishwashing soap. This made cleaning the extension tubes and syringes easy, regardless of location. (Hotel bathroom sinks do not seem like the best place to wash her gear.) The bowl is also handy in the car in case of vomiting!  *yuck* Fortunately we had no vomiting on this trip!

Traveling with our special needs princess who is fed by g-tube for medical reasons can be quite an adventure in endurance!

Our recent trip went very well, despite the fact that I forgot a few things.

One of the adjustments to our traveling paraphernalia was the addition of paper plates! As you can see in the photos below, I use them for both resting the tube and syringe as well as keeping track of how many syringe-fulls I’ve given.

after feeding three syringes, it looks like this

after feeding three syringes, it looks like this

at the end of feeding it looks like this

at the end of feeding it looks like this

Here’s a closer look at how I notate the process:

denotes minutes on the clock and the hash marks are the syringes-given

numbers denote minutes on the clock and hash marks denote number of syringes given

After several years of giving feedings via g-tube, it becomes mindless. I quickly forget how many syringes I’ve given and when.  At home, I use the kitchen timer and the wall calendar to keep track of when and how many.

On a trip, I mark both the time given (minutes only) and the number of syringes given on the paper plate. Afterwards, I can just throw it away!

I also took an 8″ diameter plastic bowl along and dishwashing soap. This made cleaning the extension tubes and syringes easy, regardless of location. (Hotel bathroom sinks do not seem like the best place to wash her gear.) The bowl is also handy in the car in case of vomiting!  *yuck* Fortunately we had no vomiting on this trip!

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