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Endocrine Disruptor Chemical Prevalent in Office Buildings

Posted Apr 06 2013 10:09pm
Posted on April 5, 2013, 6 a.m. in Environment

A flame retardant removed from children's pajamas 30 years ago but now used in polyurethane foam is prevalent in office environments, especially in older buildings, where urine testing of workers turned up widespread evidence of its biomarker.  TDCPP -- chlorinated tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate, or 'chlorinated tris' is an additive to polyurethane foam used in upholstered furniture. It is found in dust, where it can likely lead to human exposure. Potential health effects remain a concern. In 2011, TDCPP was added to the Proposition 65 list of chemicals known by the State of California to cause cancer.  Courtney C. Carignan,, from Boston University School of Public Health (Massachusetts, USA), and colleagues enrolled 31 adults who worked and lived in the Boston area who underwent urine testing to identify levels of TDCPP.  The study found that the office environment was the strongest predictor of metabolized TDCPP in urine, with significantly lower concentrations of the chemical among workers in a new office building than in older buildings. Similarly, the average concentration of TDCPP in dust was significantly lower in the new office building than in the older office buildings.  The study investigators warn that: ‘Overall our findings suggest that exposure to TDCPP in the work environment is one of the contributors to the personal exposure for office workers.”

Courtney C. Carignan, Michael D. McClean, Ellen M. Cooper, Deborah J. Watkins, Alicia J. Fraser, Wendy Heiger-Bernays, Heather M. Stapleton, Thomas F. Webster.  “Predictors of tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate metabolite in the urine of office workers.”  Environment International, Volume 55, May 2013, Pages 56-61.

  
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Office workers carry biomarker of TDCPP - chlorinated tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate, or 'chlorinated tris' – a known cancer causing endocrine disruptor.
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Tip #144 - Veggies Vex Diabetes
Type-2 diabetes affects upwards of 5% of the world’s population, and the number of cases is projected to rise in the coming decades, due to factors such as aging, obesity, and the pervasiveness of a sedentary lifestyle. Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center (Tennessee, USA) researchers followed 64,000 women residing in China, ages 40 to 70 years, for nearly 5 years, assessing their daily fruit and vegetable intakes and tracking the onset of diabetes. Those women who consumed the most vegetables -- averaging 428 grams, or 15 ounces, daily – were at 28% lower risk of developing the disease.

Researchers from Addenbrooke's Hospital (United Kingdom) followed 21,831 men and women, ages 40 to 75 years at the study’s start, for a 12-year period. The team found that men and women with the highest blood levels of vitamin C (reflecting a high fruit and vegetable intake) were at 62% reduced risk of developing type-2 diabetes, as compared to those with the lowest blood levels.

Not only rich sources of fiber, antioxidants, and magnesium, vegetables contain diabetes-reducing compounds such as phytates, lignans, and isoflavones. While the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) recommends that women ages 19-50 years consume 2 ½ cups of veggies daily, and men ages 19-50 years consume 3 cups daily, anti-aging physicians recommend doubling those amounts. » MORE
 
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