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Distractions Raise Work-Related Errors

Posted Jan 24 2013 10:09pm
Posted on Jan. 21, 2013, 6 a.m. in Brain and Mental Performance

While brief interruptions -- such as reading an email or colleagues knocking at the door -- are common in workplace, these can be cause for errors that may compromise health and safety.  Erik Altmann, from Michigan State University (Michigan, USA), and colleagues asked 300 people to complete a sequence-based procedure on a computer. The team found that interruptions of about three seconds doubled the error rate.   Observing that: “Even momentary interruptions can seem jarring when they occur during a process that takes considerable thought,” the lead investigator comments that: “What this means is that our health and safety is, on some level, contingent on whether the people looking after it have been interrupted.”

Altmann, Erik M.; Trafton, J. Gregory; Hambrick, David Z. “Momentary Interruptions Can Derail the Train of Thought.”  Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, Jan 7 , 2013.

  
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#112 - Use In Case of Emergency
The American Red Cross recommends six basics you should stock for your home in the case of an emergency. Keep the items that you would most likely need during an evacuation in an easy-to carry container (a covered trash container, a camping backpack or a duffle bag) that is kept in a readily accessible location (the guest closet or garage, for example).

Your Disaster Supplies Kit should include:
• Water: One gallon of water per person per day, keep at least a three-day supply of water per person.
• Food: A three-day supply of non-perishable food.
• First Aid Supplies: Including bandages, dressings, gloves, anti-bacterials, and non-prescription drugs (pain relievers, antacids, anti-diarrheals, etc); see the web resource below for a more thorough list
• Medications for health conditions
• Clothing
• Bedding
• Tools and emergency supplies
• Special items necessary for infants and elderly or disabled persons
• Copies of key family documents: birth certificates, marriage certificates, passports, drivers licenses, banking and credit card account numbers, insurance policies, health records, household inventory lists; continue reading for further details.
 
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