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Data Links Air Pollution to Lung Cancer

Posted Aug 08 2013 10:08pm

Researchers in Europe report data that suggests a causal role for air pollution in lung cancer.  Ole Raaschou-Nielsen, of the Danish Cancer Society Research Center (Denmark), and colleagues completed a prospective analysis of data obtained by the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE).  The overall analysis comprised 312,944 study participants and about 4.1 million person-years at risk. During a mean follow-up of 12.8 years, 2,095 cases of lung cancer were diagnosed. The meta-analyses showed a significant association between lung cancer and particulate matter <10 micrometers, represented by a hazard ratio of 1.22.  Analyses of associations between air pollution and adenocarcinoma lung cancer showed significant associations for particulate matter <10 micrometers (hazard ratio of 1.51) and <2.5 micrometers (hazard ratio of 1.55). Associations were strongest for participants who resided at the same address for longer periods of time. The study authors conclude that: “Particulate matter air pollution contributes to lung cancer incidence in Europe.”

Ole Raaschou-Nielsen, Zorana J Andersen, Rob Beelen, Evangelia Samoli, Massimo Stafoggia, Gudrun Weinmayr, et al.  “Air pollution and lung cancer incidence in 17 European cohorts: prospective analyses from the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE).”  The Lancet Oncology, Vol. 14 No. 9 pp 813-822 (Aug. 2013). 

  
Large-scale European study suggests that long-term exposure to low-level air pollution may increase the risk of lung cancer, and adenocarcinoma in particular.
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Anti-Aging Forum MLDP Join A4M
Tip #192 - Stay Connected
Researchers from the University of Chicago (Illinois, USA) report that social isolation may be detrimental to both mental and physical health. The team analyzed data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project, a nationwide US study involving 3,000 men and women, ages 57 to 85 years. They arrived at three key findings regarding the relationships between health and different types of isolation:

• The researchers found that the most socially connected older adults are three times as likely to report very good or excellent health compared to those who are least connected, regardless of whether they feel isolated.

• The team found that older adults who feel least isolated are five times as likely to report very good or excellent health as those who feel most isolated, regardless of their actual level of social connectedness.

• They determined that social disconnectedness is not related to mental health unless it brings feelings of loneliness and isolation.

Separately, Rush University Medical Center (Illinois, USA) researchers studied 906 older men and women, testing their motor functions (including grip, pinch strength, balance, and walking) and surveying their social activity, for a period of 5 years. Those study participants with less social activity were found to have a more rapid rate of motor function decline. Specifically, the team found that every one-point decrease in social activity corresponded to an increase in functional aging of 5 years, translating to a 40% higher risk of death and 65% higher risk of disability.

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