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Curcumin May Benefit Heart Health to Same Extent as Exercise

Posted Dec 09 2012 10:09pm

A number of studies suggest that curcumin, a spice compound extracted from the rootstalks of the turmeric plant and gives curry its yellow color and pungent flavor, exerts potential protective effects against Alzheimer’s Disease, certain cancers, diabetes, arthritis, and other chronic inflammation-related disorders.  Nobuhiko Akazawa , from the University of Tsukuba (Japan), and colleagues enrolled 32 post-menopausal women, in an eight week long study, assigning each subject to one of three groups: one group receiving curcumin supplements (25 mg per day); a second group instructed to engage in aerobic exercise; and the third group acting as controls. Flow mediated dilation (FMD), a marker of vascular health and potentially a predictor of future adverse cardiovascular events, increased by a significant 1.5% in both the curcumin-supplemented and exercise groups, with no changes in the control group. The study authors report that: "Our results indicated that curcumin ingestion and aerobic exercise training can increase flow-mediated dilation in postmenopausal women, suggesting that both can potentially improve the age-related decline in endothelial function.”

Nobuhiko Akazawa, Youngju Choi, Asako Miyaki, Yoko Tanabe, Jun Sugawara, Ryuichi Ajisaka, Seiji Maeda. “Curcumin ingestion and exercise training improve vascular endothelial function in postmenopausal women.”  Nutrition Research, Volume 32, Issue 10, October 2012, Pages 795-799.

  
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#86 - Sin of the Skin #7: Acne
Acne, America's #1 skin disease, is caused by a disorder of the sebaceous glands (glands in the skin that produce oil) that blocks pores, thus producing an outbreak of skin lesions we've nicknamed as zits, pimples, and other less-flattering names. Use oil-free skin care products and wear oil-free cosmetics and oil-free sunblock to reduce the risk of clogged pores. Do not pick or squeeze acne eruptions, as doing so may cause the blockage to be bushed further into the skin. If you suffer from acne use a lotion or gel that contains 2.5% benzoyl peroxide to kill off acne-causing bacteria. If you see no improvement in two months, see a dermatologist.
 
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