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Coffee May Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Posted Dec 29 2012 10:07pm
Posted on Dec. 27, 2012, 7:08 a.m. in Diabetes Functional Foods
Coffee May Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk

A number of previous studies have consistently linked regular, moderate coffee consumption with a possible reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes.  Pilar Riobo Servan, from the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC), and colleagues elucidate key mechanistic theories that underlie the possible relationship between coffee consumption and the reduced risk of diabetes. These include the 'Energy Expenditure Hypothesis', which suggests that the caffeine in coffee stimulates metabolism and increases energy expenditure and the 'Carbohydrate Metabolic Hypothesis', whereby it is thought that coffee components play a key role by influencing the glucose balance within the body. There is also a subset of theories that suggest coffee contains components that may improve insulin sensitivity though mechanisms such as modulating inflammatory pathways, mediating the oxidative stress of cells, hormonal effects or by reducing iron stores. Observing that three to four cups of coffee per day may help to prevent type 2 diabetes, the researchers also note that such moderate coffee consumption is not associated with increased risk of hypertension, stroke, or coronary heart disease.

Riobo P, et al.  Presentation at 7th World Congress on Prevention of Diabetes and Its Complications, 13 Nov. 2012.

  
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