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Beat Arthritis with Broccoli

Posted Sep 25 2013 10:08pm
Posted on Sept. 23, 2013, 6 a.m. in Arthritis Functional Foods Musculoskeletal
Beat Arthritis with Broccoli
Cruciferous vegetables – such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and cabbage – are a rich source of sulforaphane, a compound for which previous studies suggest an anti-inflammatory effect.  Ian Clark, from the University of East Anglia (United Kingdom), and colleagues have shown that sulforaphane slows down the destruction of cartilage in joints associated with painful and often debilitating osteoarthritis. The researchers found that mice fed a diet rich in the compound had significantly less cartilage damage and osteoarthritis than those that were not.  The study also examined human cartilage cells and cow cartilage tissue, finding that sulforaphane blocks the enzymes that cause joint destruction by stopping a key molecule known to cause inflammation. Observing that: “A [sulforaphane]-rich diet decreases arthritis score in the [destabilisation of medial meniscus] murine model of osteoarthritis,” the study authors conclude that: “[Sulforaphane] inhibits the expression of key metalloproteinases implicated in osteoarthritis … and blocks inflammation at … to protect against cartilage destruction in vitro and in vivo.”
Rose K Davidson, Orla Jupp, Rachel de Ferrars, Colin D Kay, Kirsty L Culley, Ian M Clark, et al.  “Sulforaphane represses matrix-degrading proteases and protects cartilage from destruction in vitro and in vivo.”  Arthritis & Rheumatism, 27 August 2013.
  
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Anti-Aging Forum MLDP Join A4M
Tip #192 - Stay Connected
Researchers from the University of Chicago (Illinois, USA) report that social isolation may be detrimental to both mental and physical health. The team analyzed data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project, a nationwide US study involving 3,000 men and women, ages 57 to 85 years. They arrived at three key findings regarding the relationships between health and different types of isolation:

• The researchers found that the most socially connected older adults are three times as likely to report very good or excellent health compared to those who are least connected, regardless of whether they feel isolated.

• The team found that older adults who feel least isolated are five times as likely to report very good or excellent health as those who feel most isolated, regardless of their actual level of social connectedness.

• They determined that social disconnectedness is not related to mental health unless it brings feelings of loneliness and isolation.

Separately, Rush University Medical Center (Illinois, USA) researchers studied 906 older men and women, testing their motor functions (including grip, pinch strength, balance, and walking) and surveying their social activity, for a period of 5 years. Those study participants with less social activity were found to have a more rapid rate of motor function decline. Specifically, the team found that every one-point decrease in social activity corresponded to an increase in functional aging of 5 years, translating to a 40% higher risk of death and 65% higher risk of disability.

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