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Advocating the Avocado

Posted Mar 21 2013 10:09pm

Avocados contain monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) dietary fiber, essential nutrients and phytochemicals. An analysis of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2008 data, involving 17,567 U.S. adults ages 19 years and older, reveals that people who consume avocados more closely adhere to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans than those who did not eat avocados, as measured by the Healthy Eating Index (HEI).  An average daily consumption of one-half of a medium sized avocado (70.1 +/- 5.4 g/day) correlated with significantly higher levels of important nutrients including 36% more dietary fiber, 23% more vitamin E, 13% more magnesium, 16% more potassium and 48% more vitamin K than non-consumers. As well, avocado consumers had significantly higher intakes of "good" fats (18% more monounsaturated and 12% more polyunsaturated) and total fats (11% more) than non-consumers, although average caloric intake of both groups was the same.  These consumption trends translated into physiologic benefits, such as: avocado consumers had significantly lower body mass index (BMI) values than non-consumers; avocado consumers had significantly smaller waist circumference measures than non-consumers (an average of 4 cm smaller, and avocado consumers had significantly higher HDL ("good") cholesterol levels. Importantly, the study found that avocado consumers had a 50% lower odds ratio for metabolic syndrome compared to non-consumers. 

Victor L Fulgoni, Mark Dreher, Adrienne J Davenport.  “Avocado consumption is associated with better diet quality and nutrient intake, and lower metabolic syndrome risk in US adults: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001–2008.”  Nutrition Journal 2013, 12:1; 2 January 2013.

  
Consuming avocados may associate with better diet quality – translating into healthier weight, as well as better cardiovascular and metabolic markers.
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Anti-Aging Forum MLDP Join A4M
Tip #138 - Unlock the Genetics of Longevity
Telomeres are the endcaps on chromosomes, and telomeric shortening is thought to govern the number of times a cell can divide. In white blood cells (leukocytes), telomere shortening is used as a marker of biological age. King’s College London (United Kingdom) researchers studied 2,401 twins, tracking their physical activity level, lifestyle habits, and examined the length of the telomeres in the subjects’ white blood cells (leukocytes).The team confirmed that telomere length decreased with age; men and women who were less physically active in their leisure time had shorter leukocyte telomeres than those who were more active. The mean difference in leukocyte telomere length between the most active subjects (who performed an average of 199 minutes of physical activity per week) versus the least active subjects (16 minutes of physical activity per week) was 200 nucleotides. This translated to mean that “the most active subjects had telomeres the same length as sedentary individuals up to 10 years younger, on average.”

Regular physical activity helps improve your overall health and fitness, and reduces your risk for many chronic diseases. Men and women ages 18 to 64 years need at least:

• 2 hours and 30 minutes (150 minutes) of moderate-intensity aerobic activity (i.e., brisk walking) every week; and muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms).

OR:
• 1 hour and 15 minutes (75 minutes) of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity (i.e., jogging or running) every week; and muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms).

OR:
• An equivalent mix of moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic activity and muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms).

Not only is it best to spread your activity out during the week, but you can break it up into smaller chunks of time during the day. As long as you're doing your activity at a moderate or vigorous effort for at least 10 minutes at a time. Consult an anti-aging physician to construct a regimen that is appropriate for your medical needs.
 
 
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