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Active Video Games Encourage Modest Physical Activity

Posted Sep 12 2012 10:09pm
Posted on Sept. 12, 2012, 6 a.m. in Exercise Lifestyle

Active video games, known as “exergames,” can play a role in getting some people to be more active. Wei Peng, from Michigan State University (Michigan, USA), and colleagues reviewed published research of studies of these games, finding that they provide light-to-moderate activity that may be suitable for populations such as seniors, to use in structured exercise programs for physical rehabilitation. 

Wei Peng, Julia C. Crouse, Jih-Hsuan Lin. “Using Active Video Games for Physical Activity Promotion: A Systematic Review of the Current State of Research.”  Health Educ Behav, July 6, 2012.

  
Systematic review reaffirms the benefits of increased dietary consumption of fruits and vegetables to help reduce a person's risk of stroke.
“Exergames” – active video games – offer light-to-moderate intensity physical activity that best suit senior-aged men and women.
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Men who complete weight training for at least 150 minutes per week are at 34% lower risk of developing type-2 diabetes.
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increased dietary intake of magnesium may help to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer.
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Anti-Aging Therapeutics 13   View the Table of Contents
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37. Anti-Aging Aid: Aspirin
Aspirin can lower a person's risk of death from any cause, even in men and women who are so inactive that their inactivity increases their risk of death. A daily low dose of aspirin (81 mg) can cut the risk of death in people known or thought to have heart disease by as much as 30-40%, by preventing platelet aggregation.
  A review of nearly 300 studies into the benefits of aspirin has confirmed that low-doses of the drug can dramatically reduce the risk of death from heart attack or stroke. People treated with aspirin or other anti-platelet drugs were 33% less likely to have a heart attack, 25% less likely to suffer a non-fatal stroke and nearly 17% less likely to die from cardiovascular-related causes...
 
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