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No Chest Hair in My Shirtless Coffee

Posted Sep 20 2013 9:54am

I am letting all of you down. I am sorry. It’s been WEEKS since I’ve written a book post.

To be fair, I’ve been firmly intrenched in the anti-logocentric world of literary theory, and thus been made (though, not grudgingly) to read required texts. Oddly enough, some of those syllabus-required tomes have made it onto my list because they were just that good. Not kidding. They were incredible.

I realize that I also work in academia, and am therefore judging other professors’ tastes through my own professor’s lens, but the point remains.

When was the last time you read a book that not only transported you through time, but also through your own subconscious? I have a book that will pull you through the depths of your own notions of the afterlife, and spit you out on “the other side”. Along the way, you’ll find yourself warring with your own thoughts and feelings on issues such as filial piety, honor, and duty.

This  book, The Ghost Bride by Yangsze Choo does all of those things. I can’t even properly categorize it. Is it an adventure novel? Literary fiction? Paranormal Romance? Historical Fiction? Who knows? Trying to fit it into any sort of traditional category seems to fly in the face of reason with this book. It just is.

The next book is one in a series of books that I have just gone crazy for. (and I promise I’ll update my goodreads page soon!) It started as a SELF PUB which I almost never read. I feel as though books often suffer greatly from lack of a good editor and second set of eyes on the page before it goes to print. This  book, however? You would honestly never know it was once a self-pub. It has all of the feel of a Hunger Games or Under the Dome,  I’d even go so far as to call it “Atwood-esque” in its succinct style, and concise world-building. It lets you dream so much of what you think it could be, without just telling you what it is. Wool   by Hugh Howey is a completely believable dystopian, and quite possibly the best mind-fuck I’ve had all year. Read it before I make you go cleaning. (this will make sense when you do what you’re told and READ IT)

The next is a YA book, which I know many of you steer clear from, and I admit, I am often one to dismiss most YA books, because I have difficulty relating to the characters. The thing about a good author? It wouldn’t matter if the protagonist was an eight-eyed, deaf, alien toad who dons a top hat–you would relate to that toad if the author made it so. On that note, David Levithan’s latest bookTwo Boys Kissing will give you ALL OF THE FEELS. It has everything from the “ugly cry” to those tingles in your chest you get when reading a particularly apt description of love, to joy and sorrow. It starts on an emotional ledge, and never lets you steer far from the brink.

And for your “light and quick” “feel good” book? This one from Rosanna Leo. Predator’s Kiss features a were-bear, a famous author with a stalker, and the elusive object in any romance novel, paranormal or not….chest hair. It’s even featured on the cover. It’s a man with manly things. Color me surprised. He wasn’t six foot six with strong arms of corded muscle and a smooth chest that felt like silk over steel. He’s like 6’1″ and has chest hair, and probably even needs deodorant and toothpaste once or twice a day. It’s refreshing. (but not before that Mitchum stick and Crest)

Ack! Have I prattled on enough? Lo siento. I get caught up when I discuss words on pages. I am a voracious reader, and it permeates every aspect of my life. When I teach, I reference them, in class, I’m assigned them. When I run, I audiobook. When I’m home, I’m reading to my bits or to myself. I audiobook when I cook, and read on the elliptical. I devour books like a vampire on blood. I gorge myself. I cannot help it. They are as necessary to me as oxygen and shirtless coffee. Even better when I am served shirtless coffee while reading.

You don’t understand why shirtless coffee and books are perfect together? More’s the pity.

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