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First pregnancy, week #5, blood string in discharge, a little diarrhea in the morning, what is going on?


Posted by gli17

I am 26 years old, good health, first pregnancy and clueless! I should be on week #5 (3 weeks after conception), and ever since week #2, I have had diarrhea in the morning, just once in the morning and gone. I am not sure if that is normal. I heard most people get constipation??? I am eating normal healthy, completely cooked food like usual!

Also, what is concerning me more is seeing a tiny bit of pink string of blood today and a week ago, just a tiny bit. I get that during ovulation too, but now that I am pregnant, is this normal? I called the doctor already but they won't see me until week 8! I am scared and confused. Please help!

 
Answers (4)
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hey, im at about 4 weeks pregnant and ivw had got a light bleeding but only when i wipe! and i found i had some red clots, is this normal is it just the baby implanting itself? please help me! thanks
Hello, I had my period may 11th, my partner and i had sex on may 30th. It is now june 4th and i have a little brown dischrge is this a sign of implantation or should i worry. i never get this before my period. please help. thank you Ak

Hi Sharon, thank you soooooo much, that was so helpful!!  I feel so much better! 

The doctor ended up calling me asking me to do a hcg level test today and again on Friday, to see if the level is increasing normally.  My fingers and toes are crossed.  Will let you know how it goes!!

Congrats on your pregnancy! First, your diarrhea maybe your personal form of morning sickness. Continue drinking lots of fluids and hopefully it will end soon. As for the bleeding, please read the article below. If you have cramping or any other alarming symptoms. I would insist on an appointment with your OB! All my best!

Subchorionic Bleeding

Sometimes, blood clots form within the layers of the placenta. But more often than not, they heal themselves.
What it is: Also called subchorionic hematoma, subchorionic bleeding is the accumulation of blood within the folds of the chorion (the outer fetal membrane, next to the placenta) or within the layers of the placenta itself. These bleeds, or clots, can cause the placenta to separate from the uterine wall if they get too large, if they develop in a bad spot, or if they aren’t eventually reabsorbed.
 
How common is it? A good 20 percent of pregnant women will experience some kind of bleeding early in pregnancy, though it’s often hard to tell what’s causing the problem. Subchorionic hematomas are even harder to pick up because they don’t always result in noticeable spotting or bleeding, especially when they’re small.
 
Who is most at risk? There don’t seem to be any specific risk factors for developing a subchorionic hematoma in the first place, but if you do wind up with one, there are factors that can make you more — or less — likely to have a positive outcome.
 
What are the symptoms? Spotting or bleeding may be a sign, often beginning in the first trimester. But many subchorionic bleeds are detected during a routine ultrasound, without there being any noticeable signs or symptoms. 
 
Should you be concerned? You wouldn’t be normal if you didn’t worry when you see blood, no matter when it occurs in your pregnancy. And that’s actually a good thing, especially if it prompts you to get in touch with your practitioner, who can make sure there’s nothing amiss. While most subchorionic hematomas dissolve on their own, it is possible for the clot to get in between the placenta and the uterine wall, resulting in miscarriage.
 
Here’s the encouraging news: More than half of women who bleed during their first trimester go on to have perfectly healthy pregnancies. But because subchorionic hematomas have been linked to increased risk of placental abruption and preterm labor, you don’t want to ignore signs of spotting or bleeding.
 
What you should do: Call your practitioner; an ultrasound may be ordered to see whether there is indeed a hematoma, how large it is, and where it’s located. Depending on the findings, as well as on your practitioner’s preferences, he or she may put you on strict bed rest, insist you refrain from lifting heavy objects, and avoid exercise. In most cases, you’ll be asked to avoid sexual intercourse until the hematoma dissolves and disappears.

 

NOTICE: The information provided on this site is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your physician or other qualified health provider because of something you have read on Wellsphere. If you have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately.
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