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Review: High Frequency Training by Chad Waterbury

Posted Oct 16 2012 10:43pm
I was fortunate to receive an advanced copy of Chad Waterbury's newest project, High Frequency Training , earlier this week, so I thought I'd do a quick write-up on the product.

One of the things I've always admired about Chad is his extensive educational background; all of his programs are based on theories that are heavily rooted in both his research and anecdotal observations.  It takes a lot of time to learn scientific principles, apply them in the real world and evaluate results, then "re-program" in consideration of what did and didn't work.  Chad is one of the few people in the industry with the unique background and experience to have accomplished this, and High Frequency Training is an outstanding example of his efforts.  There are a lot of books out there that were published by schmucks with absolutely no frame of reference; this isn't one of them.

I also think Chad does a tremendous job of relating complex topics in the conversational and easy-to-understand format.  Truthfully, I often glaze over the "rationale" portions of the books I encounter - either because I already understand them, or because it's so poorly written that I'd rather just get to the meat and potatoes (the program).  Conversely, Chad's discussion of how he came to understand the how various loading protocols impact the overall volume equation was outstanding.  In short, if you want big muscles, you have to be exposed to a high training volume - but that may come from a variety of set/rep/load combinations.

 

One can't just haphazardly add volume, though, as overuse injuries can easily kick in if you just keep adding and adding.  Additionally, you can't simply add volume in all aspects of your program; you have to pick and choose the appropriate times and places so that you're making progress instead of just treading water. Chad's program takes the guesswork out of adding volume.  And, as an added benefit, you'll likely get a bit leaner from the increased exercise volume and frequency.

Perhaps the greatest compliment I can pay to this program, though, is that it's making me revisit how I am planning my own training.  Admittedly, I've trended toward much lower volume strength training programs as I've gotten older and the rest of the stress in my life has increased.  After reading through this e-book, I'm searching for ways to add some additional volume via increased frequency as a means of complementing my current approach, which is typified almost exclusively by work in the 1-10 rep range.  With Chad talking about incorporating some much higher rep sets, I'll be dabbling a bit more in this regard.

This program won't be a good fit for you if your primary goal is strength development, but if you're looking for a way to gain muscle, try some new exercises, and deviate from a "normal" training approach, it'd be a great fit. And, you can't beat the price, as it's on sale for $50 off as an introductory offer this week only.  For more information, check out High Frequency Training .

 

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