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Q&A: Adductors and Medial Rotators

Posted Aug 26 2008 4:30pm

I just finished watching Building The Efficient Athlete and I'm really amazed by the quantity of info on it! Unfortunately, one thing really bothered me.



Adductors: how can they be MEDIAL rotators? Don't they go from ischiopubic ramus to the linea aspera? Hence it rotates laterally (unless there's something I'm ignoring).




The adductors are a tricky group of muscles; consider that there are five adductors (longus, brevis, magnus, pectineus, and gracilis), so you've got several different points of attachment. They work in all three planes of motion, and their function can actually change depending on the degree of hip flexion present.



Most important thing to remember is that the external rotation of the gluteus maximus during hip extension is counteracted by the internal rotation of the adductor magnus as it helps to extend the hip.



After that, I'd just like some extra geeky info on some details :)

The posterior fibers of the external oblique, the ones that are good for posterior pelvic tilt: What is their origin/insertion/fiber orientation so that they can do this without effect on the rib cage?




They still attach on both the rib cage and pelvis, but do so in a manner that doesn't pull the rib cage forward like the rectus abdominus. Think of the path of least resistance being a straight line; the rectus is a straight line from pelvis to anterior ribs/xiphoid process.



Could I get more detail on the mechanisms of the rotator cuff? Specifically, how do the infraspinatus and teres minor pull anteriorly?




Think "glide," not pull.



Assuming you have "perfect" posture, should you have calluses under your foot? I have pronator's calluses (under 2nd and 3rd), and am wondering if they should diminish assuming I get closer to this "perfect" posture.




Everyone has calluses - some people are just more pronounced. Correlating what you find with dynamic assessments is the key; that way, you're uncovering inefficiencies before they become pathologies. They might get a bit better.



Eric Cressey

www.EricCressey.com



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