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-Magical Scam…I Mean, Juice?-

Posted Nov 04 2009 10:06pm

snake-oil Back in the fall, you couldn’t spit without hitting some sort of Acai berry advertisement or hawker.  All of a sudden, it was as if a million Acai salespeople popped up and started pitching their magical juice to the world.

My immediate thought?

Apple cider vinegar.

Let me explain.

I actually bought this issue when I was a kid!

I actually bought this issue when I was a kid!

When I was a kid, I remember being fascinated with the Weekly World News.

I don’t know if I was more fascinated by the fact that the stories were so obviously fake, or the fact that people actually bought the crap!

So, with the mentality that most of the info conveyed in the “trash mags” is pitched at a grade-school level, one can assume that the majority of readers aren’t the most intelligent people.  Either that or they are just really bored with life…who knows?! :)  Advertisers prey on the “not so intelligent!”  After all, if you’re trying to rip off people by selling cheap goods at prices way higher than your conscience should allow, doesn’t it make sense to preach to the “below average IQ” population?  Where do you find them?  Reading the Weekly World News, National Enquirer, Sun, and/or Star magazine…oh, and watching four hour blocks of soaps each day.  BINGO!  Oh, wait…bingo halls may be another great pool of people from which to draw business…better tell the execs!

I hope y’all realize i’m just poking fun.  I know there are tons of women out there who are very intelligent and watch soaps…if you’re one of them, feel free to leave your comments!  I’m curious how many points your IQ has dropped since you started watching them. :)

Cures what ails ya!

Cures what ails ya!

Anyhow, the advertisement I most remember from this rag as well as the Enquirer, Sun, & Star (because i’d read them while mom was in the checkout line) was the one for “apple cider vinegar.”  It claimed the “miracle product” helped you lose weight, lower your blood pressure,  & slow down the aging process…oh, and let’s not forget that it cures allergies (including pet, food and environmental), sinus infections, acne, high cholesterol, flu, chronic fatigue, candida, acid reflux, sore throats, contact dermatitis, arthritis, and gout.

WOW!  It’s a miracle!

In my opinion, anything that claims to “cure” a gazillion health issues is bogus…just like a few “straight” chiropractors i’ve come to know…kinda creepy.  I’m sorry, but if you promise me the moon and stars, i’ve gotta call you a liar.

Taken from Wikipedia:

Apple cider vinegar, otherwise known simply as cider vinegar, is made fromciderorapplemustand has a brownish-yellow color. It often is sold unfiltered and unpasteurized with themother of vinegarpresent, as a natural product. It is very popular, partly due to alleged beneficial health and beauty properties. Due to its acidity, apple cider vinegar may be very harsh, even burning to the throat. If taken straight (as opposed to use in cooking), it can be diluted (e.g. with fruit juice or water) before drinking.[3]It is also sometimes sweetened with sugar or honey.[4]There have been reports of acidchemical burnsof the throat in using the pill form.[5]

Chemical burns?

Here’s what Wikipedia says about the Acai berry:

Recently, the açaí “berry” has been touted and marketed as a highly beneficialdietary supplement. Companies sell açaí berry products in the form oftablets,juice,smoothies, instant drink powders, and whole fruit.

Marketers of these products make claims that açaí provides increasedenergylevels, improvedsexualperformance, improveddigestion,detoxification, highfibercontent, highantioxidantcontent, improvedskinappearance, improvedhearthealth,improved sleep, and reduction ofcholesterollevels. More dubious claims include reversal ofdiabetesand otherchronic illnesses, as well as expanding size of thepenisand increasing men’s sexual virility and sexual attractiveness to women.[1][2]Açaí is most commonly marketed as aweight lossproduct.

As of March 2009, there are nocontrolledstudies backing up any of these claims. According toABC Newscorrespondent Susan Donaldson, these products have not been evaluated (in theUnited States) by theFDA, and their efficacy is questionable.[3]In late 2008, lawyers forThe Oprah Winfrey Showbegan investigating alleged statements from supplement manufacturers who suggested that frequent Oprahguest Dr.Mehmet Ozhad recommended their product or açai in general for weight loss.[4]

Notice a trend?

If it sounds too good to be true…it probably is! Also, if tons of people are pitching this stuff to you right nad left, it’s probably a big money-making scheme!  People are getting rich off of your “need” for a “magic bullet.” When are people gonna snap out of it?  Think of all the money that’s been thrown away on this garbage.

Wisen up, folks!

Yet again, i’m forced to repeat myself:

What works is nothing magical.

It’s simple…open mouth, insert quality, clean food…move your body…drink lots of H2O…breathe…relax…repeat.

Unfortunately, the general public finds this “information” boring…it’s not “sexy” enough…also, it requires effort…the general public is lazy…that’s why they will continue to waste their hard-earned money on crappy supplements, diet programs, and bogus exercise gadgets!

If you’re a loyal reader, it’s obvious you don’t fall into this category, and I applaud your ability to “think outside the box!”

Let me know what you think!  Leave your comments!

Get your copy of MTM 1.0 – the first book in my “Metabolic Training Method” series!


Filed under: Sarah Says | Tagged: acai, acai berry, apple cider vinegar, bogus claims, exercise, health, mona vie, nutrition, scams, snake oil, supplements | 27 Comments »

snake-oil Back in the fall, you couldn’t spit without hitting some sort of Acai berry advertisement or hawker.  All of a sudden, it was as if a million Acai salespeople popped up and started pitching their magical juice to the world.

My immediate thought?

Apple cider vinegar.

Let me explain.

I actually bought this issue when I was a kid!

I actually bought this issue when I was a kid!

When I was a kid, I remember being fascinated with the Weekly World News.

I don’t know if I was more fascinated by the fact that the stories were so obviously fake, or the fact that people actually bought the crap!

So, with the mentality that most of the info conveyed in the “trash mags” is pitched at a grade-school level, one can assume that the majority of readers aren’t the most intelligent people.  Either that or they are just really bored with life…who knows?! :)  Advertisers prey on the “not so intelligent!”  After all, if you’re trying to rip off people by selling cheap goods at prices way higher than your conscience should allow, doesn’t it make sense to preach to the “below average IQ” population?  Where do you find them?  Reading the Weekly World News, National Enquirer, Sun, and/or Star magazine…oh, and watching four hour blocks of soaps each day.  BINGO!  Oh, wait…bingo halls may be another great pool of people from which to draw business…better tell the execs!

I hope y’all realize i’m just poking fun.  I know there are tons of women out there who are very intelligent and watch soaps…if you’re one of them, feel free to leave your comments!  I’m curious how many points your IQ has dropped since you started watching them. :)

Cures what ails ya!

Cures what ails ya!

Anyhow, the advertisement I most remember from this rag as well as the Enquirer, Sun, & Star (because i’d read them while mom was in the checkout line) was the one for “apple cider vinegar.”  It claimed the “miracle product” helped you lose weight, lower your blood pressure,  & slow down the aging process…oh, and let’s not forget that it cures allergies (including pet, food and environmental), sinus infections, acne, high cholesterol, flu, chronic fatigue, candida, acid reflux, sore throats, contact dermatitis, arthritis, and gout.

WOW!  It’s a miracle!

In my opinion, anything that claims to “cure” a gazillion health issues is bogus…just like a few “straight” chiropractors i’ve come to know…kinda creepy.  I’m sorry, but if you promise me the moon and stars, i’ve gotta call you a liar.

Taken from Wikipedia:

Apple cider vinegar, otherwise known simply as cider vinegar, is made fromciderorapplemustand has a brownish-yellow color. It often is sold unfiltered and unpasteurized with themother of vinegarpresent, as a natural product. It is very popular, partly due to alleged beneficial health and beauty properties. Due to its acidity, apple cider vinegar may be very harsh, even burning to the throat. If taken straight (as opposed to use in cooking), it can be diluted (e.g. with fruit juice or water) before drinking.[3]It is also sometimes sweetened with sugar or honey.[4]There have been reports of acidchemical burnsof the throat in using the pill form.[5]

Chemical burns?

Here’s what Wikipedia says about the Acai berry:

Recently, the açaí “berry” has been touted and marketed as a highly beneficialdietary supplement. Companies sell açaí berry products in the form oftablets,juice,smoothies, instant drink powders, and whole fruit.

Marketers of these products make claims that açaí provides increasedenergylevels, improvedsexualperformance, improveddigestion,detoxification, highfibercontent, highantioxidantcontent, improvedskinappearance, improvedhearthealth,improved sleep, and reduction ofcholesterollevels. More dubious claims include reversal ofdiabetesand otherchronic illnesses, as well as expanding size of thepenisand increasing men’s sexual virility and sexual attractiveness to women.[1][2]Açaí is most commonly marketed as aweight lossproduct.

As of March 2009, there are nocontrolledstudies backing up any of these claims. According toABC Newscorrespondent Susan Donaldson, these products have not been evaluated (in theUnited States) by theFDA, and their efficacy is questionable.[3]In late 2008, lawyers forThe Oprah Winfrey Showbegan investigating alleged statements from supplement manufacturers who suggested that frequent Oprahguest Dr.Mehmet Ozhad recommended their product or açai in general for weight loss.[4]

Notice a trend?

If it sounds too good to be true…it probably is! Also, if tons of people are pitching this stuff to you right nad left, it’s probably a big money-making scheme!  People are getting rich off of your “need” for a “magic bullet.” When are people gonna snap out of it?  Think of all the money that’s been thrown away on this garbage.

Wisen up, folks!

Yet again, i’m forced to repeat myself:

What works is nothing magical.

It’s simple…open mouth, insert quality, clean food…move your body…drink lots of H2O…breathe…relax…repeat.

Unfortunately, the general public finds this “information” boring…it’s not “sexy” enough…also, it requires effort…the general public is lazy…that’s why they will continue to waste their hard-earned money on crappy supplements, diet programs, and bogus exercise gadgets!

If you’re a loyal reader, it’s obvious you don’t fall into this category, and I applaud your ability to “think outside the box!”

Let me know what you think!  Leave your comments!

Get your copy of MTM 1.0 – the first book in my “Metabolic Training Method” series!


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