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Questions, Excuses, Krokodil

Posted Sep 05 2012 8:36pm

I’ve been in more of a chatty mood lately, as regular readers have likely noticed.  I find it interesting that weeks will pass when I have little or nothing to say… and at other times, I have all sorts of random thoughts to discuss.

Excuses first– I’ve been tinkering with ads for the past few days, and I apologize to those of you who tried to read a post while I was activating and deactivating Wordpress plug-ins.  After experimenting with different colors I’ve decided that basic grayscale is the best.  For those who don’t blog, ‘plug-ins’ are small, add-on programs that add a range of functions to a blog.  There are literally thousands of them out there;  some free, some for a small charge.  A couple dozen plug-ins are designed to add the code for Google Adsense to a blog, with a range of features including adding ads randomly to old posts, etc.  I’ve found that some work better than others; a couple of them really messed up the other blog functions, causing the top banner to appear at the bottom and vice versa.  I THINK I have things working OK now;  if you are having trouble, please send me an email (drj at Suboxonetalkzone dot com) and tell me the nature of the problen, and the browser and operating system you are using.  Thanks!

Another neat feature of WordPress is that you can review a number of different statistics for a blog, including the keyword that each viewer searched for before arriving at the site.  I see certain questions posted over and over;  I presume those questions are about things that come up often in the lives of people on Suboxone.  I used to do ‘questions and answers’ on a regular basis;  I’ll try to get back to those now and then, using the most popular queries as starting points.

Yesterday, several people searched for phrases related to buprenorphine and workplace drug testing.  I’ve received a number of questions by email about that same topic.  People wonder if Suboxone (buprenorphine) shows up in drug testing, and whether they should disclose that they take the medication before the test.  This is a very tough issue.  I believe that people who take Suboxone properly are NOT impaired by the medication.  There was an article from the Mayo Clinic Proceedings recently that claimed that people ARE impaired by Suboxone, and therefore certain occupations– notably physicians and nurses– should not work at those jobs, if taking Suboxone.

There were at least two things that made their conclusions… ridiculous.  First, the authors wrote that doctors’ work is so uniquely difficult, that it challenges gray matter so much more heavily than other occupations, that doctors should avoid buprenorphine treatment.  To that, I say that a recovering anesthesiologist taking Suboxone is much safer than a recovering anesthesiologist, holding fentanyl in his/her hand, not on Suboxone!  Even if you take away the risk that the non-Suboxone doctor is using, one must consider the effects of cravings on vigilance.  I’ll take the doc on Suboxone, who is placing all of his attention on ME, over the guy reciting the serenity prayer to himself and pondering the decision over what can be ‘changed’ and what can’t!  Of course, that’s just me…

I was also impressed by the ego of the writers, who think that a pediatrician or radiologist has greater need for an ‘unmedicated brain’ than a jet pilot, or a welder ten stories up, or a long-haul trucker, or a nuclear physicist. Yes– doctor jobs are ‘uniquely’ difficult!  (add sarcasm here).

The conclusions were deeply flawed in other ways.  To determine the effects of Suboxone on performance, they looked at studies that gave people opioid agonists or buprenorphine, and concluded that the effects were similar.  I mean really– people who are not on Suboxone regularly, without a tolerance to opioids, taking buprenorphine?  OF COURSE the people were messed up!  Suboxone has potent opioid effects;  there is no argument to that point.  But the unique ceiling effects of buprenorphine allow the subjective effects to go away, as tolerance is established.  That’s the whole point of Suboxone treatment!

I’m off on a tangent, right?  Back  to drug testing…  I do not think that people on Suboxone, who take it properly, are impaired in any way.  So I do not believe that people should have to disclose their treatment, and their history, to their potential employers.  But my opinions on the matter are irrelevant, unless the new/old President-elect appoints me as Attorney General… and odds are not in favor of that happening.

I can say that I’ve received 20-30 emails over the years, asking about employee drug testing.  In each case I asked the writer to follow-up and let me know what happened.  Some ended up disclosing that they were on Suboxone, and most did not.  To date, nobody has written back to say that they were denied the job over the issue.  I therefore conclude that most employers are ignoring buprenorphine, at least at this point.  That’s the best answer I have;  I can’t recommend any specific course of action.

Finally… today I came across an old post on my forum  about a drug that was sweeping across Russia last year, called Krokodil.  The drug apparently is made from over-the-counter codeine tablets, in a process that creates a cheap concoction of opioids in a toxic sludge.  Users of the drug describe withdrawal more severe than opioid withdrawal, that includes seizures.  And within days of starting a habit, users slough off large sections of skin and other tissue from their arms, legs, torso– even from the face.  Not for the faint of heart— if you search the name of the drug under Google Images, you will find horrifying photographs of the damage inflicted on people addicted to the substance.

If anyone really thinks that drug addiction is a ‘choice,’ please tell me what, exactly, those tragic people were thinking.

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