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Death in rehab- What is wrong with California’s addiction treatment?

Posted Sep 05 2012 8:31pm

We at A3 have long been saying that there is something seriously wrong with the way addiction treatment is being regulated and with the addiction treatment system that has sprouted up as a result. Now, a government report created for the California Senate Rules Committee called “Rogue Rehabs: State failed to police drug and alcohol homes, with deadly results” (see here ) supports our notion and extends them in alarming ways. Among the major findings:

  1. Over the past decade, the California department in charge of regulating residential drug and alcohol programs consistently failed to catch life threatening problems [with addiction treatment facilities].
  2. Many addiction treatment facilities in California are providing medical care in clear violation of their licenses and often by under-trained staff.
  3. Addiction treatment providers are accepting patients that are far too impaired (as in sick) for them to handle because they would rather take the money than turn away a patient.
  4. These problems have led to several deaths within the California addiction treatment system in the last decade.

Obviously these findings are extremely disturbing and cases like the one studies in the report of Brandon Jacques, a patient who died while under the care of MorningSide Recovery’s care,  could have been prevented with more attention and transparency in our system. The idea that addiction treatment facilities that are not equipped to handle severe cases are taking them just for the money is sickening and antithetical to the reason for their existence. As far as I’m concerned, such unethical flouting of patient care should lead to an immediate revocation of their license and a ban for the management from the field.

The report also makes a number of recommendations:

  1. Allow for medical service provision at addiction treatment facilities but legislate strict oversight and accountability paid for by agency fees.
  2. Medical detox facilities should be required to have medical directors.
  3. Establishing requirements and procedures for death investigations at addiction facilities.
  4. Strict oversight of programs found to admit clients it is not fit to treat including immediate license suspension.
  5. Information sharing between addiction treatment licensing boards and medical boards.

We think it’s time that the addiction treatment industry was held to the same standard that other medical facilities are held to. It might help finally close the gap in terms of recovery outcomes.


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