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Peasant Roasted Fish, fish without FEAR!

Posted Apr 03 2014 7:35pm

When you think of roasting a whole fish do you get weak in the knees? Get a little a lot scared?
Well let me take your fear away. As a matter of fact the most difficult part of this recipe is finding a fresh whole fish! For REAL!
Here are a few simple tips...ready, set, go!
Buy for a reputable fish market. The expert is called a fishmonger -Fishmongers can be wholesalers or retailers, and are trained at selecting and purchasing, handling, gutting, boning, filleting, displaying, merchandising and selling their product. In some countries modern supermarkets are replacing fishmongers who operate in shops or fish markets. OH YA FISH DUDES!
1.  Look at the fish. Does it shine? Does it look metallic and clean? Or has it dulled or has discolored patches on it? If so, it is marginal.  2.  Smell it. A fresh fish should smell like clean water, or a touch briny or even like cucumbers. Under no circumstances should you buy a nasty smelling fish. Cooking won't improve it.                 Look at the gills. They should be a rich red. If the fish is old, they will turn the color of faded brick.  3.  Look for vibrant flesh. All fish fade as they age. If the fillet still has skin, that skin should look as pristine as the skin on an equally good whole fish – shiny and metallic. 4. Smell it. The smell test is especially important with fillets. They should have no pungent aromas.

 5. Is there liquid on the meat? If so, that liquid should be clear, not milky. Milky liquid on a fillet is the first stage of rot.
If the fishmonger lets you, press the meat with your finger. It should be resilient enough so your indentation disappears. If your fingerprint remains, move on.
I found this farm raised striped bass at my local fish market and my buddy Brian Barkley master of the camera lens took the beauty shots.     Barkley Photo of the Quad Cities Great MidWest Seafood Company.  Great-Midwest-Seafood-Company's Facebook  Now for my Happy Diabetic friends who live across the planet I get it that you won't be rushing their anytime soon  but if your in the area check them out. They would be very helpful if you had a question, just tell I sent you.
Peasant Roasted Fish
Calories: 392   Total Fat: 16.4  Total Carbs: 14.9g      Dietary Fiber: 6.1g   Sugars: 5.3g      Protein: 34.3g
2 large red onions, cut into 1/4" wedges

2 T extra virgin olive oil

10 oz fresh artichoke hearts from your garden or farmers market

1 c small cherry or grape tomatoes

2 T chopped parsley

1 clove garlic, minced

4 skinless tilapia or other fish fillets (4—6 oz each)
or one  2-3 lb. whole fish 

 Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Combine onions and oil in 13" x 9" baking dish.          Spread in an even layer. Roast until onions are golden, about 35 minutes.            Remove them from oven. Stir in the artichokes and tomatoes.    

 In a small bowl, mix parsley and garlic. Set aside. Increase oven temperature to 450
 degrees. Push vegetables to one side of dish and add fish. Spoon vegetables over fish.
 Sprinkle with parsley mixture. Return to oven and roast until fish is opaque in the center,
 about 8-10 minutes. Serves 4.
FOR THE WHOLE FISH...Preheat oven to 500°F and put a large shallow baking pan in middle of oven.Cut 3 deep slits (down to bone) crosswise on each side of fish and put fish on a tray. Rub fish inside and out with 2 tablespoons oil. Cut a garlic clove in half and rub all over skin of fish. Quickly brush hot baking pan with remaining tablespoon oil and transfer fish to pan (the pan should be hot enough to sizzle). Roast fish in middle of oven until just cooked through, 18 to 20 minutes.To serve, remove top fillet from each fish by cutting through skin along top edge of backbone and along belly. Carefully slide a large metal spatula between backbone and fillet and invert onto a platter. Pull out backbone, starting from tail end, and discard. Transfer bottom fillets to platter.


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