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Stat!: Drinking Our Sugar

Posted Nov 04 2009 10:05pm

 

soda can

Spanish Flea/Flickr

Maximum number of teaspoons of added sugars per day as recommended by dieticians: 5 to 9

Average number eaten daily by Americans: 22

Number in the typical 20 ounce soda: 17

Rank of soda among all sources of added sugar in the American diet: 1

Gallons of soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages the average American drinks each year: 50

 

Source:Bubbling Over Fact Sheet (PDF), UCLA

Read more about this report.

 

Notably, this report comes out in the midst of a lot of talk about creating a soda tax to help cut consumption and thus reduce obesity and the health problems that can come with it.

We’re not taking sides on this one – though of course we think that sugar and junk food consumption needs to go down – as we don’t think there’s any silver bullet here. We think an array of measures are likely needed to encourage change: a holistic approach, if you will, to creating a culture of healthy living.

That said, we do want to point your attention to a different take on the subject. Over at Fooducate, Hemi argues for taxing the manufacturers and increasing incentives for providing less damaging fare. It’s an intriguing idea, and one that appeals to our innate sense of fairness: penalize those who are doing the damage. Of course, the healthiest fare is minimally, if at all, processed, which undermines the very nature and purpose of the big “food” manufacturers. That alone may make this idea a non-starter. Still, Hemi makes a persuasive case. Do go check it out.


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soda can

Spanish Flea/Flickr

Maximum number of teaspoons of added sugars per day as recommended by dieticians: 5 to 9

Average number eaten daily by Americans: 22

Number in the typical 20 ounce soda: 17

Rank of soda among all sources of added sugar in the American diet: 1

Gallons of soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages the average American drinks each year: 50

 

Source:Bubbling Over Fact Sheet (PDF), UCLA

Read more about this report.

 

Notably, this report comes out in the midst of a lot of talk about creating a soda tax to help cut consumption and thus reduce obesity and the health problems that can come with it.

We’re not taking sides on this one – though of course we think that sugar and junk food consumption needs to go down – as we don’t think there’s any silver bullet here. We think an array of measures are likely needed to encourage change: a holistic approach, if you will, to creating a culture of healthy living.

That said, we do want to point your attention to a different take on the subject. Over at Fooducate, Hemi argues for taxing the manufacturers and increasing incentives for providing less damaging fare. It’s an intriguing idea, and one that appeals to our innate sense of fairness: penalize those who are doing the damage. Of course, the healthiest fare is minimally, if at all, processed, which undermines the very nature and purpose of the big “food” manufacturers. That alone may make this idea a non-starter. Still, Hemi makes a persuasive case. Do go check it out.


Bookmark and Share

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