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No-Needle Dental Numbing Coming? & Other News of Note

Posted May 28 2010 10:22am

Sniff of Local Anesthetic in the Dentist’s Chair Could Replace the Needle (PhysOrg)

Modern dentistry has eliminated much of the “ouch!” from getting a shot of local anesthetic. Now a new discovery may replace the needle used to give local anesthetic in the dentist’s chair for many procedures. Scientists are reporting evidence that a common local anesthetic, when administered to the nose as nose drops or a nasal spray, travels through the main nerve in the face and collects in high concentrations in the teeth, jaw, and structures of the mouth… More

Sugary Drinks May Up Blood Pressure (UPI)

Eliminating one serving of a sugary drink a day may lower blood pressure, researchers at the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center suggest.

Study leader Dr. Liwei Chen says the link between less consumption of surgery drinks and lowered blood pressure remained even after known high-blood-pressure risk factors were controlled for and an added adjustment was made for possible weight loss due to consuming less calories… More

Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD (Yahoo News/HealthDay)

New research suggests that exposure to high levels of organophosphate pesticides, commonly found on berries, celery and other produce, could raise the odds for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children.

At this point, though, there is no evidence that pesticide exposure can actually cause ADHD, stated the authors of a paper appearing in the June issue of PediatricsMore

Brief Exercise Reduces Impact of Stress on Cell Aging (ScienceDaily)

Exercise can buffer the effects of stress-induced cell aging, according to new research from UCSF that revealed actual benefits of physical activity at the cellular level.

The scientists learned that vigorous physical activity as brief as 42 minutes over a 3-day period, similar to federally recommended levels, can protect individuals from the effects of stress by reducing its impact on telomere length. Telomeres (pronounced TEEL-oh-meres) are tiny pieces of DNA that promote genetic stability and act as protective sheaths by keeping chromosomes from unraveling, much like plastic tips at the ends of shoelaces.

A growing body of research suggests that short telomeres are linked to a range of health problems, including coronary heart disease and diabetes, as well as early death… More

Potential Test for Gum Disease Using Little-Known Mouth Fluid (Medical News Today)

A little-known fluid produced in tiny amounts in the gums, those tough pink tissues that hold the teeth in place, has become a hot topic for scientists trying to develop an early, non-invasive test for gum disease, the No. 1 cause of tooth loss in adults. It’s not saliva, a quart of which people produce each day, but gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), produced at the rate of millionths of a quart per tooth. The study, the most comprehensive analysis of GCF to date, appears in ACS’ monthly Journal of Proteome Research.

Eric Reynolds and colleagues note that GCF accumulates at sites of inflammation in the crevice between teeth and gums. Since dental workers can easily collect the fluid from patients, GCF has become a prime candidate for a simple inexpensive test to distinguish mild gum disease from the serious form that leads to tooth loss… More

 


Children's health , Dental health , Dentistry , Exercise , Food , Nutrition adhd , blood pressure , cell aging , dental anesthetic , Dentistry , energy drinks , Exercise , gingival crevicular fluid , gum disease , periodontitis , pesticides , soda , sports drinks , sugar
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