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Flossing Teeth May Help Your Memory & Other News of Note

Posted Apr 19 2010 7:05am

Flossing Your Teeth May Also Improve Your Memory (WABC-TV)

“Researchers looked at a group of men and women over age 60 and what they found was that those who scored lowest on tests of math and memory had been exposed to greater amounts of bacteria that are known to cause gum disease. And in fact the mistakes they made were similar to those that people who had early Alzheimer’s disease made,” said Jenny Cook, executive editor of Good Housekeeping magazine… More

Researchers Find Susceptibility for Caries, Gum Disease in Genes (PhysOrg)

Certain genetic variations may be linked to higher rates of tooth decay and aggressive periodontitis, according to two recently published papers by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine and their collaborators.

Alexandre R. Vieira, D.D. S., Ph.D., senior author of both papers and an assistant professor of oral biology, and his colleagues at the School of Dental Medicine found that the rate of dental caries was influenced by individual variations, or polymorphisms, in a gene called beta defensin 1(DEFB1), which plays a key role in the first-line immune response against invading germs. The findings are available online in the Journal of Dental ResearchMore

Jaw Bone Grown from Adult Stem Cells (ScienceDaily)

A Columbia scientist has become the first to grow a complex, full-size bone from human adult stem cells.

Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, a professor of biomedical engineering at the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, reports that her team grew a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) from stem cells derived from bone marrow. Her work is reported in the online Early Edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this month… More

Chip Checks for Oral Cancer (PhysOrg)

The gentle touch of a lesion on the tongue or cheek with a brush can help detect oral cancer with success rates comparable to more invasive techniques, according to preliminary studies by researchers at Rice University, the University of Texas Health Science Centers at Houston and San Antonio and the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.

The test that uses Rice’s diagnostic nano-bio-chip was found to be 97 percent “sensitive” and 93 percent specific in detecting which patients had malignant or premalignant lesions, results that compared well with traditional tests.

The study appeared online in the journal Cancer Prevention ResearchMore

 


Filed under: dental health , dentistry , periodontal health Tagged: cancer detection , caries , dental research , flossing , genetic variation , gum disease , jaw bone , memory , oral bacteria , oral cancer , periodontitis , stem cells
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