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Breathe in, breathe out: New way of imaging lungs could improve COPD diagnosis and treatment

Posted Oct 09 2012 10:01pm

prm-lungssm_0
From left to right, PRM images of the lungs of a healthy person, two people with mild to moderate COPD, and a person with severe emphysema. Green is healthy tissue, yellow is small airway damage, and red is more severe damage.

A new approach to lung scanning could improve the diagnosis and treatment of a lung disease that affects approximately 24 million Americans and is the country’s third-highest cause of death.

In a new paper published online in Nature Medicine, a team from the University of Michigan Medical School reports on a technique called parametric response mapping, or PRM. They used PRM to analyze computed tomography, or CT, scans of the lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, known as COPD, who took part in the national COPDGene study funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

The researchers report that the PRM technique for analyzing CT scans allows them to better distinguish between early-stage damage to the small airways of the lungs, and more severe damage known as emphysema. They’ve also shown that the overall severity of a patient’s disease, as measured with PRM, matches closely with the patient’s performance on standard lung tests based on breathing ability.

“Essentially, with the PRM technique, we’ve been able to tell sub-types of COPD apart, distinguishing functional small airway disease or fSAD from emphysema and normal lung function,” says Brian Ross, Ph.D., the Roger A. Berg Research Professor of radiology, professor of biological chemistry and senior author of the new paper. “We believe this offers a new path to more precise diagnosis and treatment planning, and a useful tool for precisely assessing the impact of new medications and other treatments.”

COPD limits a patient’s breathing ability, causing shortness of breath, coughing, wheezing and reduced ability to exercise, walk and do other things. Over time, many COPD patients become disabled as their disease worsens. Most often associated with smoking, COPD can also result from long-term exposure to dust, and certain gases and chemicals.

“In the last decade, CT scan techniques for imaging COPD have improved steadily, but PRM is the missing link – giving us a robust way to see small airway disease and personalize treatment,” says Ella Kazerooni, M.D., M.S., FACS, a radiology professor who leads U-M’s lung imaging program and is a member of the COPDGene trial.

Originally developed to show the response of brain tumors to treatment, the PRM technique allows researchers to identify COPD specific changes in three-dimensional lung regions over time.

read the rest of this news release from the University of Michigan - click here


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