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Wisconsin Receives Federal Approval for CWD Herd Certification Program for Farm-raised Deer

Posted Dec 11 2012 4:22pm
Wisconsin Receives Federal Approval for CWD Herd Certification Program for Farm-raised Deer December 11, 2012
Wisconsin Receives Federal Approval for CWD Herd Certification Program for Farm-raised Deer (pdf)
Release Date: December 11, 2012
Contact: Jim Dick, Communications Director, 608-224-5020
MADISON – Wisconsin today received official approval to implement a federal herd certification program for chronic wasting disease (CWD) in farmed or captive deer, according to animal health officials at the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP). Wisconsin is only the second state in the country, after South Dakota, to implement federal rules for owners of farm-raised deer who choose to participate in the program. The rules are now in effect.
“Now that Wisconsin has received approval, the farm-raised deer keepers in Wisconsin can move deer interstate, which preserves a portion of the farm-raised deer economy,” says Dr. Robert Ehlenfeldt, Wisconsin’s State Veterinarian.
The changes for Wisconsin’s deer farmers will involve three areas including CWD testing requirements, performing a physical herd inventory and using animal identification for traceability purposes. Deer farmers who choose to participate in the new federal program must meet the new requirements, which include:
· Testing any enrolled deer that is 12 months of age or older for CWD upon death, which is younger than the previous 16 months.
· A complete physical herd inventory must be performed for all enrolled herds, the first of which must be completed by December 31, 2015.
· Each deer in an enrolled herd must have at least two forms of identification unique to the animal and securely attached by December 31, 2015 or as soon as a new deer is added to the herd from an outside source.
“Wisconsin has had a herd status program for several years, so we anticipate a rather smooth transition to the new federal program,” Ehlenfeldt said.
For more information about the federal CWD Herd Certification Program, visit http://datcp.wi.gov/Farms/Deer_Farming/index.aspx
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12.10.12FederalCWDProgram.pdf
Wisconsin Receives Federal Approval for CWD Herd Certification Program for Farm-raised Deer
Release Date: December 11, 2012
Contact: Jim Dick, Communications Director, 608-224-5020
MADISON – Wisconsin today received official approval to implement a federal herd certification program for chronic wasting disease (CWD) in farmed or captive deer, according to animal health officials at the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP). Wisconsin is only the second state in the country, after South Dakota, to implement federal rules for owners of farm-raised deer who choose to participate in the program. The rules are now in effect.
“Now that Wisconsin has received approval, the farm-raised deer keepers in Wisconsin can move deer interstate, which preserves a portion of the farm-raised deer economy,” says Dr. Robert Ehlenfeldt, Wisconsin’s State Veterinarian.
The changes for Wisconsin’s deer farmers will involve three areas including CWD testing requirements, performing a physical herd inventory and using animal identification for traceability purposes. Deer farmers who choose to participate in the new federal program must meet the new requirements, which include:
Testing any enrolled deer that is 12 months of age or older for CWD upon death, which is younger than the previous 16 months.
A complete physical herd inventory must be performed for all enrolled herds, the first of which must be completed by December 31, 2015.
Each deer in an enrolled herd must have at least two forms of identification unique to the animal and securely attached by December 31, 2015 or as soon as a new deer is added to the herd from an outside source.
“Wisconsin has had a herd status program for several years, so we anticipate a rather smooth transition to the new federal program,”
Monday, December 03, 2012
WISCONSIN Deer from Racine County has tested positive for CWD
2010 WISCONSIN CAPTIVE DEER ESCAPES
There were 26 reported escape incidents so far this year, this amounted to 20 actual confirmed escape incidents because 3 were previously reported, 2 were confirmed as wild deer, and 1 incident was not confirmed. ...
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C. & D. Captive Cervid and Law Enforcement Update (11:10 AM)- Warden Pete Dunn gave the captive cervid farm update. There were 26 reported escape incidents so far this year, this amounted to 20 actual confirmed escape incidents because 3 were previously reported, 2 were confirmed as wild deer, and 1 incident was not confirmed. Approximately 30% of these escapes were caused by gates being left open and the other 70% resulted from bad fencing or fence related issues. The 20 actual confirmed escape incidents amounted to 77 total animals. 50 of the escaped animals were recovered or killed and 27 were not recovered and remain unaccounted for. Last year the CWD Committee passed a resolution to require double gates, but this has not gone into effect yet. Questions were raised by the committee about double fencing requirements? Pete responded that double fencing has not been practical or accepted by the industry. The DNR has the authority to do fence inspections. ?If a fence fails to pass the inspection the fencing certificate can be revoked and the farmer can be issued a citation. This year three citations and one warning have been issued for escapes.
Pete reviewed the reporting requirements for escape incidents that these must be reported within 24 hours. The farmer then has 72 hours to recover the animals or else it will affect the farm’s herd status and ability to move animals. Davin proposed in the 15 year CWD Plan that the DNR take total control and regulatory authority over all deer farm fencing. Larry Gohlke asked Pete about the reliability for reporting escapes? Pete said that the majority of escapes were reported by the farmer, but it is very difficult to determine when an escape actually occurred. Pete said that they are more concerned that an escape is reported and not that it is reported at the exact time that it happened.
THE states are going to have to regulate how many farms that are allowed, or every state in the USA will wind up being just one big private fenced in game farm. kind of like they did with the shrimping industry in the bays, when there got to be too many shrimp boats, you stop issuing permits, and then lower the exist number of permits, by not renewing them, due to reduced permits issued.
how many states have $465,000., and can quarantine and purchase there from, each cwd said infected farm, but how many states can afford this for all the cwd infected cervid game ranch type farms ??
11,000 game farms X $465,000., do all these game farms have insurance to pay for this risk of infected the wild cervid herds, in each state ??
Tuesday, December 20, 2011
CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD WISCONSIN Almond Deer (Buckhorn Flats) Farm Update DECEMBER 2011
The CWD infection rate was nearly 80%, the highest ever in a North American captive herd.
RECOMMENDATION: That the Board approve the purchase of 80 acres of land for $465,000 for the Statewide Wildlife Habitat Program in Portage County and approve the restrictions on public use of the site.
Form 1100-001 (R 2/11) NATURAL RESOURCES BOARD AGENDA ITEM
SUBJECT: Information Item: Almond Deer Farm Update
FOR: DECEMBER 2011 BOARD MEETING TUESDAY TO BE PRESENTED BY TITLE: Tami Ryan, Wildlife Health Section Chief
SUMMARY:
Saturday, February 04, 2012
Wisconsin 16 age limit on testing dead deer Game Farm CWD Testing Protocol Needs To Be Revised
Monday, January 16, 2012
9 GAME FARMS IN WISCONSIN TEST POSITIVE FOR CWD
see full text and more here ;
Thursday, February 09, 2012
50 GAME FARMS IN USA INFECTED WITH CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE
Volume 18, Number 3—March 2012
Samuel E. Saunders1, Shannon L. Bartelt-Hunt, and Jason C. Bartz
Author affiliations: University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Omaha, Nebraska, USA (S.E. Saunders, S.L. Bartelt-Hunt); Creighton University, Omaha (J.C. Bartz)
Synopsis
Occurrence, Transmission, and Zoonotic Potential of Chronic Wasting Disease
CWD has been identified in free-ranging cervids in 15 US states and 2 Canadian provinces and in ≈100 captive herds in 15 states and provinces and in South Korea (Figure 1, panel B).
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Most epidemiologic studies and experimental work have suggested that the potential for CWD transmission to humans is low, and such transmission has not been documented through ongoing surveillance (2,3). In vitro prion replication assays report a relatively low efficiency of CWD PrPSc-directed conversion of human PrPc to PrPSc (30), and transgenic mice overexpressing human PrPc are resistant to CWD infection (31); these findings indicate low zoonotic potential. However, squirrel monkeys are susceptible to CWD by intracerebral and oral inoculation (32). Cynomolgus macaques, which are evolutionarily closer to humans than squirrel monkeys, are resistant to CWD infection (32). Regardless, the finding that a primate is orally susceptible to CWD is of concern...
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Reasons for Caution There are several reasons for caution with respect to zoonotic and interspecies CWD transmission. First, there is strong evidence that distinct CWD strains exist (36). Prion strains are distinguished by varied incubation periods, clinical symptoms, PrPSc conformations, and CNS PrPSc depositions (3,32). Strains have been identified in other natural prion diseases, including scrapie, BSE, and CJD (3). Intraspecies and interspecies transmission of prions from CWD-positive deer and elk isolates resulted in identification of >2 strains of CWD in rodent models (36), indicating that CWD strains likely exist in cervids. However, nothing is currently known about natural distribution and prevalence of CWD strains. Currently, host range and pathogenicity vary with prion strain (28,37). Therefore, zoonotic potential of CWD may also vary with CWD strain. In addition, diversity in host (cervid) and target (e.g., human) genotypes further complicates definitive findings of zoonotic and interspecies transmission potentials of CWD.
Intraspecies and interspecies passage of the CWD agent may also increase the risk for zoonotic CWD transmission. The CWD prion agent is undergoing serial passage naturally as the disease continues to emerge. In vitro and in vivo intraspecies transmission of the CWD agent yields PrPSc with an increased capacity to convert human PrPc to PrPSc (30). Interspecies prion transmission can alter CWD host range (38) and yield multiple novel prion strains (3,28). The potential for interspecies CWD transmission (by cohabitating mammals) will only increase as the disease spreads and CWD prions continue to be shed into the environment. This environmental passage itself may alter CWD prions or exert selective pressures on CWD strain mixtures by interactions with soil, which are known to vary with prion strain (25), or exposure to environmental or gut degradation.
Given that prion disease in humans can be difficult to diagnose and the asymptomatic incubation period can last decades, continued research, epidemiologic surveillance, and caution in handling risky material remain prudent as CWD continues to spread and the opportunity for interspecies transmission increases. Otherwise, similar to what occurred in the United Kingdom after detection of variant CJD and its subsequent link to BSE, years of prevention could be lost if zoonotic transmission of CWD is subsequently identified,...
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Wednesday, December 05, 2012
Senator Casey Urges USDA To Take Smart Steps to Implement New Measure That Could Help Combat Chronic Wasting Disease Among Deer
From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
Sent: Wednesday, December 05, 2012 11:50 AM
Cc: ckauffman@yorkdispatch.com ; Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
Subject: Casey Urges USDA To Take Smart Steps to Implement New Measure That Could Help Combat Chronic Wasting Disease Among Deer
Wednesday, November 14, 2012
PENNSYLVANIA 2012 THE GREAT ESCAPE OF CWD INVESTIGATION MOVES INTO LOUISIANA
Tuesday, November 13, 2012
PENNSYLVANIA 2012 THE GREAT ESCAPE OF CWD
Wednesday, November 07, 2012
PENNSYLVANIA Second Adams County Deer Tests Positive for Chronic Wasting Disease
Friday, October 26, 2012
***CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD PENNSYLVANIA GAME FARMS, URINE ATTRACTANT PRODUCTS, BAITING, AND MINERAL LICKS
Tuesday, October 23, 2012
PA Captive deer from CWD-positive farm roaming free
Wednesday, October 17, 2012, 11:33 PM
Pennsylvania CWD number of deer exposed and farms there from much greater than first thought
Thursday, October 11, 2012
Pennsylvania Confirms First Case CWD Adams County Captive Deer Tests Positive
Sunday, December 09, 2012
Pennsylvania Sportsmen upset with agriculture’s lack of transparency on CWD
Friday, October 12, 2012
Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) is Now Accepting Comments on Rule Proposals for “Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD)”
TO: comments@tahc.state.tx.us;
Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC)
Friday, November 09, 2012
Chronic Wasting Disease CWD in cervidae and transmission to other species
additional data submission ;
Name: Terry S. Singeltary
Address: Bacliff, TX,
Submitter's Representative: CJD TSE PRION VICTIMS
Organization: LAYPERSON
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General Comment
Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposals, Submissions, and Approvals: Chronic Wasting Disease Herd Certification Program (Document ID APHIS-2011-0032-0001)
I believe that any voluntary program for CWD free herd certification from game farms will be futile, as was the partial and voluntary mad cow feed ban of August 4, 1997. That failed terribly, with some 10,000,000 of banned blood laced MBM being fed out in 2007, a decade post August 4, 1997 partial and voluntary ban.
Game farms are a petri dish for CWD TSE Prion disease, with Wisconsin having documented 9 CWD infected game farms, with one having the highest CWD infection rate in the world, 80% CWD infection rate.
I believe that all game farms should be SHUT DOWN PERMANENTLY.
CWD TSE prion disease survives ashing to 600 degrees celsius, that’s around 1112 degrees farenheit.
you cannot cook the CWD TSE prion disease out of meat.
you can take the ash and mix it with saline and inject that ash into a mouse, and the mouse will go down with TSE.
Prion Infected Meat-and-Bone Meal Is Still Infectious after Biodiesel Production as well.
the TSE prion agent also survives Simulated Wastewater Treatment Processes.
IN fact, you should also know that the CWD TSE Prion agent will survive in the environment for years, if not decades.
you can bury it and it will not go away.
CWD TSE agent is capable of infected your water table i.e. Detection of protease-resistant cervid prion protein in water from a CWD-endemic area.
it’s not your ordinary pathogen you can just cook it out and be done with.
that’s what’s so worrisome about Iatrogenic mode of transmission, a simple autoclave will not kill this TSE prion agent.
Tuesday, December 20, 2011
CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD WISCONSIN Almond Deer (Buckhorn Flats) Farm Update DECEMBER 2011
kind regards,
terry
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