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USDA Officials: CWD Standards Going to Public Comment Soon

Posted Sep 25 2013 12:48pm
USDA Officials: CWD Standards Going to Public Comment Soon

 

September 20, 2013

 

USDA/APHIS invited several industry leaders to Washington D.C. to discuss concerns regarding the agencies rules and regulations and their impact on the cervid industry . Wednesday, September 18th, two representatives from each of the four national associations, which included the North American Elk Breeders Association, North American Deer Farmers Association, Exotic Wildlife Association, and the Reindeer Owners and Breeders Association, and long time cervid industry veterinarian Dr Glen Zebarth, met with the USDA/AHIS representatives for several hours. The general discussion was centered on exploring possible opportunities for the continued growth of the cervid industry and how the USDA could assist with this future growth. Ongoing challenges and hurdles, within the cervid industry, were the main topic of discussion.

 

Dr Zebarth and Ray Burdett said the cervid industry could thrive if the USDA could find research money to help develop a live CWD test and/or vaccine. All the cervid leaders asked for the USDA to assist with positive messaging, especially in those states that were continually being bombarded with negative messaging concerning the farmed cervid industry. This would be especially helpful based on the fact that the USDA does support the cervid industry and wants to see its future growth. Charly Seale, Travis Lowe, and Eric Mohlman, focused more on the immediate need to loosen regulations. They said it was the current regulations in place and fear of more regulations through the standards that are causing us to lose more and more cervid farmers in all our states, today. This discussion led to a discussion on the current proposed CWD Standards and when they would be und for public comment. The USDA said it would hopefully be next month.

 

 There is still a tremendous amount of anguish among some industry representatives regarding how many changes, beneficial to the cervid industry, will be made in Version 23. It was noted there are over a dozen industry concerns noted on the American Cervid Alliance Rule vs. Standards Comparison Chart that must be resolved. USDA's Dr TJ Myers asked that the cervid industry make a strong showing during the public comment period pointing out both the positive and negative areas of the Program Standards.

 


 

 

JUST SAY NO !

 

 

Wednesday, September 04, 2013

 

***cwd - cervid captive livestock escapes, loose and on the run in the wild...

 


 

 

LIKE I said before, in my opinion, the only reason that the shooting pen owners want the USDA et al as stewards of that industry, it’s the lack of oversight by the USDA to regulate them properly, thus, CWD will spread further. this is just another fine example of just that $$$

 

 

livestock. These commenters noted that APHIS' authority to prevent, control, or eradicate diseases, pursuant to the AHPA, specifically refers to livestock. These commenters pointed out that that the legal definition of livestock is highly variable among States; many States do not define captive native species as "livestock," since livestock is not always within the sole jurisdiction of their fish and wildlife agencies. Thus, the commenters stated, in some instances captive cervids of native species may not fall within the Federal definition of livestock. The commenters recommended removing the references to livestock in the regulations or yielding to a State's definition when referring to cervids in this way. We appreciate the commenters' concerns. Clearly, farmed and captive cervids are not traditional livestock; they are often referred to as alternative livestock. We understand that State fish and wildlife agencies in many States are responsible for the management of all cervids within their State, not just those that are wild but also those held on farms or in other captive 18 situations. Nonetheless, these agencies may not have experience working within the context of a program designed to control an animal disease in farmed or captive animal populations. The AHPA charges the U.S. Department of Agriculture with the responsibility of controlling or eradicating any pest or disease of livestock, and defines "livestock" broadly as "all farm-raised animals." This means that all farmed or captive cervids fall under the AHPA definition of livestock. Under this authority, we have determined that it is appropriate to establish requirements for the interstate movement of farmed or captive cervids to help prevent the spread of CWD. To the extent that State fish and wildlife agencies are responsible for farmed or captive cervids in their States, they will need to cooperate with APHIS in the administration of the CWD regulations. We will work with State fish and wildlife agencies to help them to understand their responsibilities and to ensure that we can cooperate well. It is important to reiterate that States retain the authority to manage fish and wildlife populations, including wild cervids, under this final rule.

 


 

 

USDA TO PGC ONCE CAPTIVES ESCAPE "it‘s no longer its business.”

 

 

Commission, sportsmen pay for fences around deer farm

 

Published: Saturday, January 5, 2013, 8:54 p.m. Updated 12 hours ago

 

Sportsmen have paid to keep wild deer from accessing a farm connected to the discovery of chronic wasting disease this past fall.

 

The bill, to rebuild fences, was not theirs to pay. But pay it they did, through the Pennsylvania Game Commission.

 

The farm is located in York County. No wasting disease was found there. But it was one of the first four put under quarantine by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture because of its connection to an Adams County farm where the disease was discovered. The quarantine means, among other things, that fences are to be maintained so that wild deer cannot move onto the property and perhaps contract the disease.

 

The department of agriculture — in response to questions in a letter from the Pennsylvania federation of Sportsmen‘s Clubs — indicated re-fencing should occur. It said its quarantine order allows for criminal and civil penalties against deer farmers who don‘t live up to its mandates.

 

“This provides a very strong incentive to re-fence such areas,” its letter to the Federation reads.

 

But with no fences rebuilt months after the disease‘s discovery and no indication that they would be any time soon, the Game Commission decided it couldn‘t wait any longer. It paid to re-fence the farm in an attempt to protect wild deer.

 

“We would have waited a long, long time ... putting free-roaming deer at risk,” said Cal DuBrock, director of the commission‘s bureau of wildlife management. “It was an investment worth making.”

 

Commission executive director Carl Roe did not say how much money the agency spent, but said “it was an expense.”

 

In the meantime, the commission is taking a more aggressive approach to dealing with escaped deer.

 

Two such animals got loose from deer farms this fall. The department of agriculture — again, to the consternation of the Federation — did not notify the public of the escapes. It explained its silence by saying that once a deer is outside a fence, whether it got there intentionally or not, it‘s no longer its business.

 

“The department … defers to the Game Commission once a deer is considered wild or free ranging,” reads its letter to the Federation. Because such escapes are “numerous” in any given year, DuBrock said, the commission has asked the agriculture department to immediately notify executive director Carl Roe, DuBrock and veterinarian Walt Cottrell of them. From there, wildlife conservation officers have the green light to shoot those deer as soon as safely possible “and figure out the ownership later,” DuBrock said.

 

Bob Frye is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach him at bfrye@tribweb.com or via Twitter @bobfryeoutdoors.

 

 


 

 

“Two such animals got loose from deer farms this fall. The department of agriculture — again, to the consternation of the Federation — did not notify the public of the escapes. It explained its silence by saying that once a deer is outside a fence, whether it got there intentionally or not, it‘s no longer its business.”

 

LIKE I said before, the only reason that the shooting pen owners want the USDA et al as stewards of that industry, it’s the lack of oversight by the USDA to regulate them properly, thus, CWD will spread further. this is just another fine example of just that $$$

 

 

Sunday, January 06, 2013

 

USDA TO PGC ONCE CAPTIVES ESCAPE "it‘s no longer its business.”

 


 

 

Thursday, August 08, 2013

 

Characterization of the first case of naturally occurring chronic wasting disease in a captive red deer (Cervus elaphus) in North America

 


 

 

Friday, August 09, 2013

 

CWD TSE prion, plants, vegetables, and the potential for environmental contamination

 


 

 

*** The potential impact of prion diseases on human health was greatly magnified by the recognition that interspecies transfer of BSE to humans by beef ingestion resulted in vCJD. While changes in animal feed constituents and slaughter practices appear to have curtailed vCJD, there is concern that CWD of free-ranging deer and elk in the U.S. might also cross the species barrier. Thus, consuming venison could be a source of human prion disease. Whether BSE and CWD represent interspecies scrapie transfer or are newly arisen prion diseases is unknown. Therefore, the possibility of transmission of prion disease through other food animals cannot be ruled out. There is evidence that vCJD can be transmitted through blood transfusion. There is likely a pool of unknown size of asymptomatic individuals infected with vCJD, and there may be asymptomatic individuals infected with the CWD equivalent. These circumstances represent a potential threat to blood, blood products, and plasma supplies.

 


 

 

Sunday, August 25, 2013

 

Prion2013 Chronic Wasting Disease CWD risk factors, humans, domestic cats, blood, and mother to offspring transmission

 


 

 

Sunday, July 21, 2013

 

*** As Chronic Wasting Disease CWD rises in deer herd, what about risk for humans?

 


 

 

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

 

Cervid Industry Unites To Set Direction for CWD Reform and seem to ignore their ignorance and denial in their role in spreading Chronic Wasting Disease

 


 

 

Thursday, July 11, 2013

 

The New Hornographers: The Fight Over the Future of Texas Deer, Captive shooting pens, and the CWD TSE prion disease

 


 

 

Tuesday, July 02, 2013

 

National Rifle Association and the Unified Sportsman of Florida support a Florida ban on the importation of captive deer and cervids into Florida

 


 

 

Sunday, June 09, 2013

 

Missouri House forms 13-member Interim Committee on the Cause and Spread of Chronic Wasting Disease CWD

 


 

 

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

 

Cervid Industry Unites To Set Direction for CWD Reform and seem to ignore their ignorance and denial in their role in spreading Chronic Wasting Disease

 


 

 

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

 

Iowa Brakke Family Farmed CWD livestock update July 3, 2013

 


 

 

Saturday, February 04, 2012

 

Wisconsin 16 MONTH age limit on testing dead deer Game Farm CWD Testing Protocol Needs To Be Revised

 


 

 

Monday, June 24, 2013

 

The Effects of Chronic Wasting Disease on the Pennsylvania Cervid Industry Following its Discovery

 


 

 

Sunday, September 01, 2013

 

hunting over gut piles and CWD TSE prion disease

 


 

 

sub-clinical CWD !

 


 

 

Friday, September 20, 2013

 

Missouri State records show gaps in oversight of captive deer farms, ranches

 


 

 

Friday, September 20, 2013

 

PENNSYLVANIA ADJUSTS CWD RULES Release #069-13 September 20, 2013

 


 

 

Thursday, September 19, 2013

 

Chronic Wasting Disease CWD surveillance, deer feeding ban continues in southeastern Minnesota

 


 

 

Thursday, September 19, 2013

 

North Carolina Wildlife Commission Seeks to Test 3,000 Deer for Deadly Disease CWD

 


 

 

Thursday, September 19, 2013

 

Illinois Chronic Wasting Disease: 2012-2013 Surveillance and Management Report

 


 

 

 Friday, December 14, 2012

 

DEFRA U.K. What is the risk of Chronic Wasting Disease CWD being introduced into Great Britain? A Qualitative Risk Assessment October 2012

 

snip...

 

In the USA, under the Food and Drug Administration’s BSE Feed Regulation (21 CFR 589.2000) most material (exceptions include milk, tallow, and gelatin) from deer and elk is prohibited for use in feed for ruminant animals. With regards to feed for non-ruminant animals, under FDA law, CWD positive deer may not be used for any animal feed or feed ingredients.

 

*** For elk and deer considered at high risk for CWD, the FDA recommends that these animals do not enter the animal feed system.

 

*** However, this recommendation is guidance and not a requirement by law.

 

Animals considered at high risk for CWD include:

 

1) animals from areas declared to be endemic for CWD and/or to be CWD eradication zones and

 

2) deer and elk that at some time during the 60-month period prior to slaughter were in a captive herd that contained a CWD-positive animal.

 

Therefore, in the USA, materials from cervids other than CWD positive animals may be used in animal feed and feed ingredients for non-ruminants.

 

The amount of animal PAP that is of deer and/or elk origin imported from the USA to GB can not be determined, however, as it is not specified in TRACES. It may constitute a small percentage of the 8412 kilos of non-fish origin processed animal proteins that were imported from US into GB in 2011.

 

Overall, therefore, it is considered there is a __greater than negligible risk___ that (nonruminant) animal feed and pet food containing deer and/or elk protein is imported into GB.

 

There is uncertainty associated with this estimate given the lack of data on the amount of deer and/or elk protein possibly being imported in these products.

 

snip...

 

36% in 2007 (Almberg et al., 2011). In such areas, population declines of deer of up to 30 to 50% have been observed (Almberg et al., 2011). In areas of Colorado, the prevalence can be as high as 30% (EFSA, 2011).

 

The clinical signs of CWD in affected adults are weight loss and behavioural changes that can span weeks or months (Williams, 2005). In addition, signs might include excessive salivation, behavioural alterations including a fixed stare and changes in interaction with other animals in the herd, and an altered stance (Williams, 2005). These signs are indistinguishable from cervids experimentally infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE).

 

Given this, if CWD was to be introduced into countries with BSE such as GB, for example, infected deer populations would need to be tested to differentiate if they were infected with CWD or BSE to minimise the risk of BSE entering the human food-chain via affected venison.

 

snip...

 

The rate of transmission of CWD has been reported to be as high as 30% and can approach 100% among captive animals in endemic areas (Safar et al., 2008).

 

snip...

 

In summary, in endemic areas, there is a medium probability that the soil and surrounding environment is contaminated with CWD prions and in a bioavailable form. In rural areas where CWD has not been reported and deer are present, there is a greater than negligible risk the soil is contaminated with CWD prion.

 

snip...

 

In summary, given the volume of tourists, hunters and servicemen moving between GB and North America, the probability of at least one person travelling to/from a CWD affected area and, in doing so, contaminating their clothing, footwear and/or equipment prior to arriving in GB is greater than negligible. For deer hunters, specifically, the risk is likely to be greater given the increased contact with deer and their environment. However, there is significant uncertainty associated with these estimates.

 

snip...

 

Therefore, it is considered that farmed and park deer may have a higher probability of exposure to CWD transferred to the environment than wild deer given the restricted habitat range and higher frequency of contact with tourists and returning GB residents.

 

snip...

 

see full text report here ;

 


 

 

see much more here ;

 

 

Friday, December 14, 2012

 

DEFRA U.K. What is the risk of Chronic Wasting Disease CWD being introduced into Great Britain? A Qualitative Risk Assessment October 2012

 


 

 

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

 

Inspections, Compliance, Enforcement, and Criminal Investigations BSE TSE PRION 2013

 


 

 

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

 

Review and Updates of the USDA-APHIS Veterinary Services (VS) National Chronice Wasting Disease (CWD) Program 2012-2013

 


 

 

Sunday, August 11, 2013

 

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease CJD cases rising North America updated report August 2013

 

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease CJD cases rising North America with Canada seeing an extreme increase of 48% between 2008 and 2010

 


 

 

 

Comment from Terry Singeltary

 

Document ID: APHIS-2011-0032-0002

 

Document Type: Public Submission

 

This is comment on Notice:

 

Agency Information Collection Activities;

 

Proposals, Submissions, and Approvals: Chronic Wasting Disease Herd Certification Program Docket ID: APHIS-2011-0032 RIN:

 

Topics: No Topics associated with this document View Document: Less Document Subtype: Public Comment Status: Posted Received Date: January 24 2012, at 12:00 AM Eastern Standard Time Date Posted: January 25 2012, at 12:00 AM Eastern Standard Time Comment Start Date: January 24 2012, at 12:00 AM Eastern Standard Time Comment Due Date: March 26 2012, at 11:59 PM Eastern Daylight Time Tracking Number: 80fa2c68 First Name: Terry Middle Name: S. Last Name: Singeltary City: Bacliff Country: United States State or Province: TX Organization Name: LAYPERSON Submitter's Representative: CJD TSE PRION VICTIMS

 

Comment: Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposals, Submissions, and Approvals: Chronic Wasting Disease Herd Certification Program (Document ID APHIS-2011-0032-0001) I believe that any voluntary program for CWD free herd certification from game farms will be futile, as was the partial and voluntary mad cow feed ban of August 4, 1997. That failed terribly, with some 10,000,000 of banned blood laced MBM being fed out in 2007, a decade post August 4, 1997 partial and voluntary ban. Game farms are a petri dish for CWD TSE Prion disease, with Wisconsin having documented 9 CWD infected game farms, with one having the highest CWD infection rate in the world, 80% CWD infection rate. I believe that all game farms should be SHUT DOWN PERMANENTLY. CWD TSE prion disease survives ashing to 600 degrees celsius, that’s around 1112 degrees farenheit. you cannot cook the CWD TSE prion disease out of meat. you can take the ash and mix it with saline and inject that ash into a mouse, and the mouse will go down with TSE. Prion Infected Meat-and-Bone Meal Is Still Infectious after Biodiesel Production as well. the TSE prion agent also survives Simulated Wastewater Treatment Processes. IN fact, you should also know that the CWD TSE Prion agent will survive in the environment for years, if not decades. you can bury it and it will not go away. CWD TSE agent is capable of infected your water table i.e. Detection of protease-resistant cervid prion protein in water from a CWD-endemic area. it’s not your ordinary pathogen you can just cook it out and be done with. that’s what’s so worrisome about Iatrogenic mode of transmission, a simple autoclave will not kill this TSE prion agent.

 

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

 

CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD WISCONSIN Almond Deer (Buckhorn Flats) Farm Update DECEMBER 2011

 


 


 

see full text ;

 


 

 

 

=================================================

 

 

Comment from Terry Singeltary Document ID: APHIS-2006-0118-0100 Document Type: Public Submission This is comment on Proposed Rule: Chronic Wasting Disease Herd Certification Program and Interstate Movement of Farmed or Captive Deer, Elk, and Moose Docket ID: APHIS-2006-0118 RIN:0579-AB35

 

Topics: No Topics associated with this document View Document: Less Document Subtype: Public Comment Status: Posted Received Date: May 16 2009, at 05:19 PM Eastern Daylight Time Date Posted: May 19 2009, at 12:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time Comment Start Date: March 31 2009, at 12:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time Comment Due Date: June 01 2009, at 11:59 PM Eastern Daylight Time Tracking Number: 8099740b First Name: Terry Middle Name: S. Last Name: Singeltary City: Bacliff Country: United States State or Province: TX Organization Name: CJD WATCH

 

Comment: APHIS-2006-0118-0096

 

 

Greetings APHIS et al,

 

 

I would kindly like to comment on ; Docket ID APHIS-2006-0118 Docket Title Chronic Wasting Disease Herd Certification Program Document ID APHIS-2006-0118-0096 Document Title Chronic Wasting Disease Herd Certification Program and Interstate Movement of Farmed or Captive Deer, Elk, and Moose with great sadness, my comments are as follows ;

 

 

DUE to the likelihood of CWD transmission to humans as a zootic disease, and proven transmission of CWD to other species via the lab, and the highly environmental transmission routes of CWD, the threat that game farms pose to the wild is great.

 

RECENTLY, in the May 2009 CDC warns of this potential of prions to humans via CWD and Nutritional Supplements from ELK ANTLER VELVET.

 

ALSO RECENTLY, a multi-state recall of ELK MEAT PRODUCTS FROM A CWD POSITIVE ELK. (they are not recalling all this meat for the well being of the dead cwd positive elk.)

 

SOME of these game farms have proven to have a high infectious rate for CWD. Some as high as 79% infection rate.

 

A NEW 2nd strain of CWD i.e. (THE WISCONSIN STRAIN of CWD?), and what will this curtail i.e. as in transmission ??

 

we found out with BSE in cattle, that the atypical strains, some are more virulent in transmission. FOR all these reasons, it is urgent to keep the failures of the CWD factory farming industry of 'big rack' deer and elk, to spreading to the wild.

 

I urge that 100% CWD testing of elk, deer, and all animals on game farms tested for CWD/TSE. ANY positive should result in complete herd eradication. ANY GAME farm with one positive CWD animal must be shut down for good due to the ramifications of environmental infection risk factors, and future infection there from, there of.

 

THE land there from, must be contained, and quarantined for 5 years, with no introduction of any game and or farm producing livestock for humans and or animals, and or crop production. Then a reevaluation of that farm/land and environmental risk factors there of must be done for a reassessment, before any use of that farm/land could go forward.

 

ANY and all water run off must be contained at owners expense.

 

ALL elk and deer and or any animal from game farms, must be identifiable and traceable, at all times.

 

THIS all should be mandatory, and regulated by the federal government, because the chance of different regulations, and lack of enforcement, state by state, would enhance the spreading of CWD.

 

WE must stop CWD before it spreads to all STATES, and until a validated 100% CWD TSE live test is available, one that can be used at birth, and until there is a way to completely decontaminate land that has been infected with the CWD agent, in my opinion, these draconian measures are the only plausible measures which i know of that can be taken, which might stop this spread of CWD to every state. see ;

 

see full text submission here ;

 


 

 

 

 

Comment from Terry Singeltary This is a Comment on the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) Notice: Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposals, Submissions, and Approvals: Chronic Wasting Disease Herd Certification Program

 


 

 

 

 

DOCKET-- 03D-0186 -- FDA Issues Draft Guidance on Use of Material From Deer and Elk in Animal Feed; Availability

 

Date: Fri, 16 May 2003 11:47:37 –0500

 

EMC 1 Terry S. Singeltary Sr. Vol #: 1

 


 

 


 

 

 

PLEASE SEE FULL TEXT SUBMISSION ;

 

 


 

 

 

----- Original Message -----

 

From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."

 

To: "INFORMATION DEPT"

 

Sent: Friday, July 12, 2002 8:43 PM

 

Subject: Re: CWD AMERICA ??

 

hello Dr. Jebara,

 

many thanks for your swift and kind reply.

 

if i am not mistaken, it was the same email address. it was 3 or 4 weeks ago i wrote, as it is, i don't save 'sent' emails anymore, unless very important.

 

my main concern (besides the fact that a potential TSE has been in the USA cattle for some time, but the APHIS do not test to find), is that the CWD could very well be transmitting to humans, and i just did not see to much posted about it on OIE site.

 

Coming back to your question, Chronic Wasting Disease is not an OIE

 

listed disease. Please see OIE disease lists at

 

 


 

 

 

why is this TSE (CWD) not listed and followed as with BSE ?'

 

 

 

Article 1.1.3.2. 1. Countries shall make available to other countries, through the OIE, whatever information is necessary to minimise the spread of important animal diseases and to assist in achieving better worldwide control of these diseases.

 

 


 

 

 

The USA CWD is an important animal disease.

 

why is it not followed?

 

The decision to add or delete a disease from the OIE lists, come through proposals made by Member Countries and it has to be adopted by the International Committee.

 

i _urgently_ suggest a proposal to the OIE to follow this disease very closely, and to propose _more_ testing in the USA for TSEs in the USA cattle...

 

 

kindest regards, terry

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

 

O.I.E. BSE, CWD, SCRAPIE, TSE PRION DISEASE Final Report of the 80th General Session, 20 - 25 May 2012

 


 

 

 

 

Friday, October 12, 2012

 

Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) is Now Accepting Comments on Rule Proposals for “Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD)”

 


 

Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC)

 


 

 

 

 

TSS
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