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The battle against Chronic Wasting Disease continues in Southeast Iowa

Posted Jun 08 2013 10:54am
Subject: The battle against Chronic Wasting Disease continues in Southeast Iowa


DAVIS COUNTY, IOWA -- The battle against Chronic Wasting Disease continues in Southeast Iowa.


After deer at the Pine Ridge Hunting Preserve in Davis County tested positive for CWD, the area was supposed to be quarantined to prevent it from being spread further. Even though the animals are now gone from the area, it's been brought to light that the gates to the facility have been left open, sometimes chained open, supposedly by the landowner, which raises the risk of CWD being spread into the surrounding area.


"This is just appalling because you have a highly contaminated area that is quarantined to prevent the spread of a highly contagious disease to the wild herd and here you have the gates of a contaminated facility - a quarantined contaminated facility - open," said State Representative Curt Hanson. "In my opinion, that's just irresponsible."


If the disease spreads into the wild herd, it could have a detrimental domino effect -- not just on the deer population, but on Iowa's hunting economy.


"Right now, it's only in the captive herd, we do not wish to have this spread to the wild herd," Hanson said. "There would be very large consequences, many of them economic."


"It would have quite an effect upon our hunting in the state and the amount of revenue and things that the DNR brings in from the hunters to come into the state of Iowa," said State Representative Mary Gaskill. "[Getting] their deer license and people will quit hunting if they're fearful that they're not getting good deer."


Hanson said he was not offered an explanation as to why the gates were left open, but both he and Gaskill are working with the DNR and the Attorney General's Office to remedy the situation.


The Attorney General's Office will hopefully be looking into legal options to protect neighbors and residents near the facility.


Hanson said, ideally, the DNR will check in on the reserve periodically to make sure the quarantine is being executed correctly.







Wednesday, May 15, 2013


Intranasal Inoculation of White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) with Lyophilized Chronic Wasting Disease Prion Particulate Complexed to Montmorillonite Clay


Research Article






Tuesday, October 23, 2012


PA Captive deer from CWD-positive farm roaming free






HERE, we see why these shooting pen owners some much like the USDA oversight of these game farms ;



USDA TO PGC ONCE CAPTIVES ESCAPE "it‘s no longer its business.” problem solved $$$...TSS



Sunday, January 06, 2013



USDA TO PGC ONCE CAPTIVES ESCAPE "it‘s no longer its business.”






what happened to the PA deer from the CWD index heard that went to Louisiana ?? or Indiana ??




Tuesday, May 28, 2013


Chronic Wasting Disease CWD quarantine Louisiana via CWD index herd Pennsylvania Update May 28, 2013


6 doe from Pennsylvania CWD index herd still on the loose in Louisiana, quarantine began on October 18, 2012, still ongoing, Lake Charles premises.






Tuesday, April 16, 2013


Cervid Industry Unites To Set Direction for CWD Reform and seem to ignore their ignorance and denial in their role in spreading Chronic Wasting Disease






how many states have $465,000., and can quarantine and purchase there from, each cwd said infected farm, but how many states can afford this for all the cwd infected cervid game ranch type farms ??


T


uesday, December 20, 2011


CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD WISCONSIN Almond Deer (Buckhorn Flats) Farm Update DECEMBER 2011


The CWD infection rate was nearly 80%, the highest ever in a North American captive herd.


RECOMMENDATION: That the Board approve the purchase of 80 acres of land for $465,000 for the Statewide Wildlife Habitat Program in Portage County and approve the restrictions on public use of the site.


SUMMARY:











pens, PENS, PENS ??




*** Spraker suggested an interesting explanation for the occurrence of CWD. The deer pens at the Foot Hills Campus were built some 30-40 years ago by a Dr. Bob Davis. At or abut that time, allegedly, some scrapie work was conducted at this site. When deer were introduced to the pens they occupied ground that had previously been occupied by sheep.






now, decades later ;



2012


PO-039: A comparison of scrapie and chronic wasting disease in white-tailed deer


Justin Greenlee, Jodi Smith, Eric Nicholson US Dept. Agriculture; Agricultural Research Service, National Animal Disease Center; Ames, IA USA


Interspecies transmission studies afford the opportunity to better understand the potential host range and origins of prion diseases. The purpose of these experiments was to determine susceptibility of white-tailed deer (WTD) to scrapie and to compare the resultant clinical signs, lesions, and molecular profiles of PrPSc to those of chronic wasting disease (CWD). We inoculated WTD intracranially (IC; n = 5) and by a natural route of exposure (concurrent oral and intranasal (IN); n = 5) with a US scrapie isolate. All deer were inoculated with a 10% (wt/vol) brain homogenate from sheep with scrapie (1ml IC, 1 ml IN, 30 ml oral). All deer inoculated by the intracranial route had evidence of PrPSc accumulation. PrPSc was detected in lymphoid tissues as early as 7 months-post-inoculation (PI) and a single deer that was necropsied at 15.6 months had widespread distribution of PrPSc highlighting that PrPSc is widely distributed in the CNS and lymphoid tissues prior to the onset of clinical signs. IC inoculated deer necropsied after 20 months PI (3/5) had clinical signs, spongiform encephalopathy, and widespread distribution of PrPSc in neural and lymphoid tissues. The results of this study suggest that there are many similarities in the manifestation of CWD and scrapie in WTD after IC inoculation including early and widespread presence of PrPSc in lymphoid tissues, clinical signs of depression and weight loss progressing to wasting, and an incubation time of 21-23 months. Moreover, western blots (WB) done on brain material from the obex region have a molecular profile similar to CWD and distinct from tissues of the cerebrum or the scrapie inoculum. However, results of microscopic and IHC examination indicate that there are differences between the lesions expected in CWD and those that occur in deer with scrapie: amyloid plaques were not noted in any sections of brain examined from these deer and the pattern of immunoreactivity by IHC was diffuse rather than plaque-like. After a natural route of exposure, 100% of WTD were susceptible to scrapie. Deer developed clinical signs of wasting and mental depression and were necropsied from 28 to 33 months PI. Tissues from these deer were positive for PrPSc by IHC and WB. Similar to IC inoculated deer, samples from these deer exhibited two different molecular profiles: samples from obex resembled CWD whereas those from cerebrum were similar to the original scrapie inoculum. On further examination by WB using a panel of antibodies, the tissues from deer with scrapie exhibit properties differing from tissues either from sheep with scrapie or WTD with CWD. Samples from WTD with CWD or sheep with scrapie are strongly immunoreactive when probed with mAb P4, however, samples from WTD with scrapie are only weakly immunoreactive. In contrast, when probed with mAb’s 6H4 or SAF 84, samples from sheep with scrapie and WTD with CWD are weakly immunoreactive and samples from WTD with scrapie are strongly positive. This work demonstrates that WTD are highly susceptible to sheep scrapie, but on first passage, scrapie in WTD is differentiable from CWD.








2011


*** After a natural route of exposure, 100% of white-tailed deer were susceptible to scrapie.








Scrapie in Deer: Comparisons and Contrasts to Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD)


Justin J. Greenlee of the Virus and Prion Diseases Research Unit, National Animal Disease Center, ARS, USDA, Ames, IA provided a presentation on scrapie and CWD in inoculated deer. Interspecies transmission studies afford the opportunity to better understand the potential host range and origins of prion diseases. We inoculated white-tailed deer intracranially (IC) and by a natural route of exposure (concurrent oral and intranasal inoculation) with a US scrapie isolate. All deer inoculated by the intracranial route had evidence of PrPSc accumulation and those necropsied after 20 months post-inoculation (PI) (3/5) had clinical signs, spongiform encephalopathy, and widespread distribution of PrPSc in neural and lymphoid tissues. A single deer that was necropsied at 15.6 months PI did not have clinical signs, but had widespread distribution of PrPSc. This highlights the facts that 1) prior to the onset of clinical signs PrPSc is widely distributed in the CNS and lymphoid tissues and 2) currently used diagnostic methods are sufficient to detect PrPSc prior to the onset of clinical signs. The results of this study suggest that there are many similarities in the manifestation of CWD and scrapie in white-tailed deer after IC inoculation including early and widespread presence of PrPSc in lymphoid tissues, clinical signs of depression and weight loss progressing to wasting, and an incubation time of 21-23 months. Moreover, western blots (WB) done on brain material from the obex region have a molecular profile consistent with CWD and distinct from tissues of the cerebrum or the scrapie inoculum. However, results of microscopic and IHC examination indicate that there are differences between the lesions expected in CWD and those that occur in deer with scrapie: amyloid plaques were not noted in any sections of brain examined from these deer and the pattern of immunoreactivity by IHC was diffuse rather than plaque-like. After a natural route of exposure, 100% of white-tailed deer were susceptible to scrapie. Deer developed clinical signs of wasting and mental depression and were necropsied from 28 to 33 months PI. Tissues from these deer were positive for scrapie by IHC and WB. Tissues with PrPSc immunoreactivity included brain, tonsil, retropharyngeal and mesenteric lymph nodes, hemal node, Peyer’s patches, and spleen. While two WB patterns have been detected in brain regions of deer inoculated by the natural route, unlike the IC inoculated deer, the pattern similar to the scrapie inoculum predominates.



Committee Business:


The Committee discussed and approved three resolutions regarding CWD. They can be found in the report of the Reswolutions Committee. Essentially the resolutions urged USDA-APHIS-VS to:


Continue to provide funding for CWD testing of captive cervids


Finalize and publish the national CWD rule for Herd Certification and Interstate Movement


Evaluate live animal test, including rectal mucosal biopsy, for CWD in cervids







2011 Annual Report


Research Project: TRANSMISSION, DIFFERENTIATION, AND PATHOBIOLOGY OF TRANSMISSIBLE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES Location: Virus and Prion Research Unit


2011 Annual Report


In Objective 1, Assess cross-species transmissibility of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) in livestock and wildlife, numerous experiments assessing the susceptibility of various TSEs in different host species were conducted. Most notable is deer inoculated with scrapie, which exhibits similarities to chronic wasting disease (CWD) in deer suggestive of sheep scrapie as an origin of CWD.


snip...


4.Accomplishments 1. Deer inoculated with domestic isolates of sheep scrapie. Scrapie-affected deer exhibit 2 different patterns of disease associated prion protein. In some regions of the brain the pattern is much like that observed for scrapie, while in others it is more like chronic wasting disease (CWD), the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy typically associated with deer. This work conducted by ARS scientists at the National Animal Disease Center, Ames, IA suggests that an interspecies transmission of sheep scrapie to deer may have been the origin of CWD. This is important for husbandry practices with both captive deer, elk and sheep for farmers and ranchers attempting to keep their herds and flocks free of CWD and scrapie.








White-tailed Deer are Susceptible to Scrapie by Natural Route of Infection


Jodi D. Smith, Justin J. Greenlee, and Robert A. Kunkle; Virus and Prion Research Unit, National Animal Disease Center, USDA-ARS


Interspecies transmission studies afford the opportunity to better understand the potential host range and origins of prion diseases. Previous experiments demonstrated that white-tailed deer are susceptible to sheep-derived scrapie by intracranial inoculation. The purpose of this study was to determine susceptibility of white-tailed deer to scrapie after a natural route of exposure. Deer (n=5) were inoculated by concurrent oral (30 ml) and intranasal (1 ml) instillation of a 10% (wt/vol) brain homogenate derived from a sheep clinically affected with scrapie. Non-inoculated deer were maintained as negative controls. All deer were observed daily for clinical signs. Deer were euthanized and necropsied when neurologic disease was evident, and tissues were examined for abnormal prion protein (PrPSc) by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and western blot (WB). One animal was euthanized 15 months post-inoculation (MPI) due to an injury. At that time, examination of obex and lymphoid tissues by IHC was positive, but WB of obex and colliculus were negative. Remaining deer developed clinical signs of wasting and mental depression and were necropsied from 28 to 33 MPI. Tissues from these deer were positive for scrapie by IHC and WB. Tissues with PrPSc immunoreactivity included brain, tonsil, retropharyngeal and mesenteric lymph nodes, hemal node, Peyer’s patches, and spleen. This work demonstrates for the first time that white-tailed deer are susceptible to sheep scrapie by potential natural routes of inoculation. In-depth analysis of tissues will be done to determine similarities between scrapie in deer after intracranial and oral/intranasal inoculation and chronic wasting disease resulting from similar routes of inoculation.


see full text ;








Wednesday, January 02, 2013



Iowa Third Deer Positive CWD at Davis County Hunting Preserve Captive Shooting Pen









Friday, December 14, 2012



IOWA Second Deer Positive for CWD at Davis County Hunting Preserve Captive Shooting Pen









Friday, September 21, 2012



Chronic Wasting Disease CWD raises concerns about deer farms in Iowa









Tuesday, September 11, 2012



Agreement Reached with Owner to De-Populate CWD Deer at Davis County Hunting Preserve Iowa









Wednesday, September 05, 2012



Additional Facility in Pottawatamie County Iowa Under Quarantine for CWD after 5 deer test positive









Friday, July 20, 2012



CWD found for first time in Iowa at hunting preserve









SOME OLD HISTORY ON CWD AND GAME FARMS ;







see more here;








CWD policies in various states SCWDS BRIEFS April 1998 Issue State Fish & Game Departments: all 50 states


Nebraska Dept of Agriculture and Game and Parks


On April 9, 1998, chronic wasting disease (CWD) was diagnosed in a captive elk in Nebraska.� This discovery follows the confirmation of CWD in two captive elk herds in South Dakota earlier this year.� The Nebraska elk was a 4 1/2-year old male that was among a privately owned herd of approximately 150 elk.� The health of the animal had deteriorated for about 2 months before it died.� Confirmation of CWD was made by the USDA's National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa. The case history revealed that the affected elk was born on a farm on the Western Slope of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado, but it was on two additional Colorado farms before it arrived in Nebraska at 2 to 2 1/2 years of age.� One of the Colorado premises was in the known CWD-endemic region along the Eastern Slope of the Rocky Mountains in northcentral Colorado.



snip...







CWD News: Under-diagnosis in elk: 10/17 prove positive with better method 21 Jan 99 -- Utah hunter: CWD blood recall? 20 Dec 98 -- Bad news on game farm elk CWD 12 Nov 98 --Colorado CJD tragedy and CWD concerns 11 Oct 98 -- Nevada testing deer and elk for CWD 23 Jun 98 -- Elk CWD spreading on game farms 19 Mar 98 -- BSE Inquiry: Day 6 -- Mink and CWD misinformation 19 Mar 98 -- CWD: spreading it around 19 Mar 98 -- CWD: failed eradication attempts 19 Mar 98 -- CWD in Estes Park: what goes on at Lexington Lane? 19 Mar 98 -- 14 facilities where CWD has been found 19 Mar 98 -- How did CWD get started and spread? 19 Mar 98 -- Elk growers ask for surveillance in N. Dakota 19 Mar 98 -- Ban on elk antlers in human food rejected 19 Mar 98 -- CWD in High Country News 19 Mar 98 -- CWD Web Resources 14 Feb 98 -- Colorado's dementia experiment in humans 24 Feb 98 -- Feds need to take control over Colorado CWD 14 Feb 98 -- Surveillance for chronic wasting disease in Colorado 14 Feb 98 -- CWD by river drainage 14 Feb 98 -- Some early history of CWD 10 Jul 97 -- Chronic Wasting Disease in Canada23 Jul 98 -- Saskatchewan elk disease waning? 14 Feb 98 -- More chronic wasting disease news: 1, 2 14 Feb 98 -- Welcome to Stetsonville 07 Feb 98 -- Deer in three Wyoming counties infected with chronic wasting disease 07 Feb 98 -- Chronic wasting disease: deer-to-cattle shown 07 Feb 98 -- Worry over CWD hazards 05 Feb 98 -- Canada reports CWD in mule deer on game farms 07 Feb 98 -- Dr. Steven Dealler on CWD risks 27 Jan 98 -- Concerned rancher writes in about deer feeding habits 03 Feb 98 -- To eat or not to eat is the hunter's question 01 Mar 97 -- CWD and hunters square off in Colorado 01 Apr 97 -- CWD: lab progress is slow 01 Mar 97 -- Mystery of CWD in US deer, elk explained? Chronic wasting disease update




snip...see ;









Thursday, February 09, 2012


50 GAME FARMS IN USA INFECTED WITH CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE







The chances of a person or domestic animal contracting CWD are “extremely remote,” Richards said. The possibility can’t be ruled out, however. “One could look at it like a game of chance,” he explained. “The odds (of infection) increase over time because of repeated exposure. That’s one of the downsides of having CWD in free-ranging herds: We’ve got this infectious agent out there that we can never say never to in terms of (infecting) people and domestic livestock.”







*** The potential impact of prion diseases on human health was greatly magnified by the recognition that interspecies transfer of BSE to humans by beef ingestion resulted in vCJD. While changes in animal feed constituents and slaughter practices appear to have curtailed vCJD, there is concern that CWD of free-ranging deer and elk in the U.S. might also cross the species barrier. Thus, consuming venison could be a source of human prion disease. Whether BSE and CWD represent interspecies scrapie transfer or are newly arisen prion diseases is unknown. Therefore, the possibility of transmission of prion disease through other food animals cannot be ruled out. There is evidence that vCJD can be transmitted through blood transfusion. There is likely a pool of unknown size of asymptomatic individuals infected with vCJD, and there may be asymptomatic individuals infected with the CWD equivalent. These circumstances represent a potential threat to blood, blood products, and plasma supplies.







Friday, November 09, 2012


*** Chronic Wasting Disease CWD in cervidae and transmission to other species







Sunday, November 11, 2012


*** Susceptibilities of Nonhuman Primates to Chronic Wasting Disease November 2012







Friday, December 14, 2012


Susceptibility Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in wild cervids to Humans 2005 - December 14, 2012








TSS

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