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TEXAS DEER BREEDERS CHEER TWO NEW BILLS SB 1444 AND HB 2092 THAT COULD HELP POTENTIALLY ENHANCE CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD

Posted Mar 14 2013 11:56am
TEXAS DEER BREEDERS CHEER TWO NEW BILLS SB 1444 AND HB 2092 THAT COULD HELP POTENTIALLY ENHANCE CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD
 
 



PLEASE SEE ;


 


State officials weigh outdoors recreation issues



James Nielsen, Staff
Authority to regulate Texas' commercial deer breeding industry would shift from Texas Parks and Wildlife Department to Texas Animal Health Commission under a pair of bills filed in the Texas Legislature.
By Shannon Tompkins
March 14, 2013
shift oversight of the commercial white-tailed deer breeding industry from the state's wildlife agency to its commercial livestock agency;
snip...
Deer breeding
Identical bills - SB 1444 by Sen. Juan Hinojosa, D-McAllen, and HB 2092 by Rep. John Kuempel, R-Seguin - would transfer responsibility for regulating the commercial breeding of white-tailed and mule deer from Texas Parks and Wildlife Department to Texas Animal Health Commission.
The relatively new industry built around manipulation of deer genetics to produce bucks with unusually large antlers has chaffed under TPWD oversight. Moving regulation of what is, really, a commercial livestock industry to the Animal Health Commission, which oversees the state's livestock industry, is seen by the deer breeders as better for their business.
snip...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
> Moving regulation of what is, really, a commercial livestock industry to the Animal Health Commission, which oversees the state's livestock industry, is seen by the deer breeders as better for their business.
 
 
 
please allow me to explain why this is $$$
 
 
 
by allowing the TAHC to govern over regulation, surveillance, testing, etc. over the cervid shooting pens in Texas, you simply will have no regulation. a perfect example would be how the TAHC covered up the first documented stumbling and staggering mad cow in Texas, and almost got away with covering up another mad cow in Texas, by allowing the highly suspect BSE samples to sit up on some shelf for 7 months as negative, while a world of scientists complained, to finally have to have an act of Congress (yes, literally an act of Congress to override Austin’s TAHC cover up of mad cow disease in TEXAS), to finally get that sample sent to Weybridge England, where it was finally confirmed 7+ months later, all the while the infamous BSE MRR policy i.e. BSE Minimal Risk Policy went into effect, this policy (thanks to the OIE and the USDA et al), made it legal to trade Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy TSE prion disease as a global commodity i.e. as commerce. Thus, this is exactly what you will have with the TAHC trying to contain CWD in Texas, another cover-up.
 
 
 
NOW, back to the cervid shooting pens in Texas, and why is they are cheering these bills BILLS SB 1444 AND HB 2092, simply put, it’s like the wolf guarding the henhouse.
 
 
 
 
I have seen this from state to state, I have seen the shooting pen industry try to push this legislation through, simply because they know their industry will escape stricter regulations and oversight.
 
 
 
 
if you don’t look, and in the case of Texas TAHC, if you purposely LOOK IN ALL THE WRONG PLACES FOR OVER A DECADE i.e. TRANS PECOS, like I told TAHC ONE DECADE (10 years ago), you simply will not find.
 
 
 
 
I can assure you, IF the TAHC would start testing these captive shooting pen cervids like they should be tested, and in enough numbers, I think we all would be very disturbed as to what they would find.
 
 
 
 
and in my opinion, this is their goal, i.e. SSS policy, same as with the other TSE mad cow prion type disease.
 
 
 
 
I urge all HUNTERS and OFFICIALS that might be hunters, to vote these BILLS SB 1444 AND HB 2092, to VOTE NO, and to keep the captive shooting pen industry under Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.
 
 
 
 
I am saddened once again that Shannon Tompkins of the Houston Chronicle has chosen to stay silence and mum on the risk from these captive shooting pens, farms, ranches, from the Chronic Wasting Disease CWD, and other disease, they bring with them. I wonder how many of these shooting pens he has seen or been on over the years ? maybe Mr. Tompkins has forgot what he has written about in the past about CWD and risk factors there from when he was writing about CWD _before Texas was documented state?
 
 
 
 
 
Thursday, December 27, 2012
CWD TSE PRION, dr. deer, shooting pen type game farms and ranchers, Texas, TAHC, Houston Chronicle, all silent about disease ?
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thursday, December 13, 2012
HUNTERS FEELING THE HEAT Houston Chronicle December 13, 2012 OUTDOORS not talking about CWD in Texas
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Wednesday, November 07, 2012
Chronic Wasting Disease CWD, Texas, Houston Chronicle Shannon Thomkins 1998 - 2012 what happened ??
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thursday, July 12, 2012
CWD aka MAD DEER, ELK DISEASE TEXAS HOUSTON CHRONICLE Wednesday, July 11, 2012
 
 
 
 
 
 
please see reference materials below ;
 
 
 
 
Saturday, March 09, 2013
Chronic Wasting Disease in Bank Voles: Characterisation of the Shortest Incubation Time Model for Prion Diseases
 
 
 
 
Tuesday, June 05, 2012
Captive Deer Breeding Legislation Overwhelmingly Defeated During 2012 Legislative Session
 
 
 
 
 
 
Friday, August 31, 2012
COMMITTEE ON CAPTIVE WILDLIFE AND ALTERNATIVE LIVESTOCK and CWD 2009-2012 a review
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tuesday, December 18, 2012
*** A Growing Threat How deer breeding could put public trust wildlife at risk
 
 
 
 
 
2012 CDC REPORT ON CWD
Volume 18, Number 3—March 2012 Synopsis Occurrence, Transmission, and Zoonotic Potential of Chronic Wasting Disease
snip...
Prevalence and Surveillance
Originally recognized only in southeastern Wyoming and northeastern Colorado, USA, CWD was reported in Canada in 1996 and Wisconsin in 2001 and continues to be identified in new geographic locations (Figure 1, panel A). CWD has been identified in free-ranging cervids in 15 US states and 2 Canadian provinces and in ≈100 captive herds in 15 states and provinces and in South Korea (Figure 1, panel B).
snip...
CWD surveillance programs are now in place in almost all US states and Canadian provinces (Figure 2, panel A). More than 1,060,000 free-ranging cervids have reportedly been tested for CWD (Figure 2, panel B) and ≈6,000 cases have been identified (Figure 2, panel C) according to data from state and provincial wildlife agencies.
 
snip...
Testing of captive cervids is routine in most states and provinces, but varies considerably in scope from mandatory testing of all dead animals to voluntary herd certification programs or mandatory testing of only animals suspected of dying of CWD.
 
snip...
Long-term effects of CWD on cervid populations and ecosystems remain unclear as the disease continues to spread and prevalence increases. In captive herds, CWD might persist at high levels and lead to complete herd destruction in the absence of human culling. Epidemiologic modeling suggests the disease could have severe effects on free-ranging deer populations, depending on hunting policies and environmental persistence (8,9). CWD has been associated with large decreases in free-ranging mule deer populations in an area of high CWD prevalence (Boulder, Colorado, USA) (5). In addition, CWD-infected deer are selectively preyed upon by mountain lions (5), and may also be more vulnerable to vehicle collisions (10). Long-term effects of the disease may vary considerably geographically, not only because of local hunting policies, predator populations, and human density (e.g., vehicular collisions) but also because of local environmental factors such as soil type (11) and local cervid population factors, such as genetics and movement patterns (S.E. Saunders, unpub. data).
 
snip...
Controlling the spread of CWD, especially by human action, is a more attainable goal than eradication. Human movement of cervids has likely led to spread of CWD in facilities for captive animals, which has most likely contributed to establishment of new disease foci in free-ranging populations (Figure 1, panel A). Thus, restrictions on human movement of cervids from disease-endemic areas or herds continue to be warranted. Anthropogenic factors that increase cervid congregation such as baiting and feeding should also be restricted to reduce CWD transmission. Appropriate disposal of carcasses of animals with suspected CWD is necessary to limit environmental contamination (20), and attractive onsite disposal options such as composting and burial require further investigation to determine contamination risks. The best options for lowering the risk for recurrence in facilities for captive animals with outbreaks are complete depopulation, stringent exclusion of free-ranging cervids, and disinfection of all exposed surfaces. However, even the most extensive decontamination measures may not be sufficient to eliminate the risk for disease recurrence (20; S.E. Saunders et al. unpub. data)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tuesday, December 20, 2011
 
 
CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD WISCONSIN Almond Deer (Buckhorn Flats) Farm Update DECEMBER 2011
 
 
The CWD infection rate was nearly 80%, the highest ever in a North American captive herd.
 
 
RECOMMENDATION: That the Board approve the purchase of 80 acres of land for $465,000 for the Statewide Wildlife Habitat Program in Portage County and approve the restrictions on public use of the site.
 
 
Form 1100-001 (R 2/11) NATURAL RESOURCES BOARD AGENDA ITEM
 
 
SUBJECT: Information Item: Almond Deer Farm Update
 
 
FOR: DECEMBER 2011 BOARD MEETING TUESDAY TO BE PRESENTED BY TITLE: Tami Ryan, Wildlife Health Section Chief
 
 
 
SUMMARY:
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Friday, February 08, 2013
*** Behavior of Prions in the Environment: Implications for Prion Biology
 
 
 
 
Friday, November 09, 2012
*** Chronic Wasting Disease CWD in cervidae and transmission to other species
 
 
 
 
Sunday, November 11, 2012
*** Susceptibilities of Nonhuman Primates to Chronic Wasting Disease November 2012
 
 
 
 
Friday, December 14, 2012
Susceptibility Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in wild cervids to Humans 2005 - December 14, 2012
 
 
 
 
Saturday, March 10, 2012
*** CWD, GAME FARMS, urine, feces, soil, lichens, and banned mad cow protein feed CUSTOM MADE for deer and elk
 
 
 
 
Subject: CWD SURVEILLANCE STATISTICS TEXAS (total testing figures less than 50 in two years)
Date: Sun, 25 Aug 2002 21:06:49 –0700
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
######## Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #########
greetings list members,
here are some figures on CWD testing in TEXAS...TSS
Dear Dr. Singletary,
 
 
In Fiscal Year 2001, seven deer from Texas were tested by the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) for CWD (5 fallow deer and 2 white-tailed deer). In Fiscal Year 2002, seven elk from Texas were tested at NVSL (no deer). During these two years, an additional six elk and one white-tailed deer were tested at the Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL). In Fiscal Year 2002, four white-tailed deer (free-ranging clinical suspects) and at least eight other white-tailed deer have been tested at TVMDL. One elk has been tested at NVSL. All of these animals have been found negative for CWD. Dr. Jerry Cooke of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department also has records of 601 clinically ill white-tailed deer which were necropsied at Texas A&M during the late 1960's and early 1970's, and no spongiform encepalopathies were noted. Thank you for your consideration.
xxxxxxx
Texas Animal Health Commission
(personal communication...TSS)
Austin 8 news
snip...
"There's about 4 million deer in the state of Texas, and as a resource I think we need to be doing as much as we can to look for these diseases," said Doug Humphreys with Texas Parks and Wildlife. "Right now Texas is clear. We haven't found any, but that doesn't mean we don't look."
 
 
 
With approximately 4 million animals, Texas has the largest population of white-tailed deer in the nation. In addition, about 19,000 white-tailed deer and 17,000 elk are being held in private facilities. To know if CWD is present in captive herds, TPWD and Texas Animal Health Commission are working with breeders to monitor their herds.
 
 
 
How is it spread?
It is not known exactly how CWD is spread. It is believed that the agent responsible for the disease may be spread both directly (animal to animal contact) and indirectly (soil or other surface to animal). It is thought that the most common mode of transmission from an infected animal is via saliva, feces, and urine.
 
 
 
some surveillance?
beyond the _potential_ methods of transmissions above, why, not a single word of SRM of various TSE species in feed as a source?
it's a known fact they have been feeding the deer/elk the same stuff as cows here in USA.
and the oral route has been documented of CWD to mule deer fawns in lab studies.
not to say that other _potential_ transmission mechanisms are possible, but why over look the obvious?
TSS
 
 
 
 
 
From: Ken Waldrup, DVM, PhD (host25-207.tahc.state.tx.us)
Subject: Re: CWD SAMPLING TEXAS (but NOT in the obvious place, the NM, TEXAS border)
Date: December 15, 2003 at 3:43 pm PST
In Reply to: CWD SAMPLING TEXAS (but NOT in the obvious place, the NM, TEXAS border) posted by TSS on December 12, 2003 at 2:15 pm:
Dear sirs:
With regard to your comment about Texas NOT looking for CWD along the New Mexico border, it is painfully obvious that you do not know or understand the natural distribution of mule deer out there or the rights of the land owners in this state. As of 15 December 2003, a total of 42 deer had been sampled from what we call "Trans-Pecos", beyond the Pecos River. Mule deer are very widely dispersed through this area, sometimes at densities of one animal per 6 square miles. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department does not have the legal authority to trepass on private property to collect deer. Some landowners are cooperative. Some are not. Franklin State Park is at the very tip of Texas, and deer from the park have been tested (all negative). One of the single largest land owners along the border is the National Park Service. Deer and elk from the Guadalupe Peak National Park cannot be collected with federal permission. The sampling throughout the state is based on the deer populations by eco-region and is dictated by the availability of funds. I am concerned about your insinuation that CWD is a human health risk. We are at a stand-off - you have no proof that it is and I have no definitive proof that it isn't. However I would say that the inferred evidence from Colorado, Wyoming and Wisconsin suggests that CWD is not a human health concern (i.e. no evidence of an increased incidence of human brain disorders within the CWD "endemic" areas of these states). From my professional interactions with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, I can definitely say that they want to do a thorough and sound survey throughout the state, not willy-nilly "look here, look there". There are limitations of manpower, finances and, in some places, deer populations. I would congratulate TPWD for doing the best job with the limitations at hand rather than trying to browbeat them when you obviously do not understand the ecology of West Texas. Thank you for your consideration.
======================
 
 
 
From: TSS (216-119-139-126.ipset19.wt.net)
Subject: Re: CWD SAMPLING TEXAS (but NOT in the obvious place, the NM, TEXAS border)
Date: December 16, 2003 at 11:03 am PST
In Reply to: Re: CWD SAMPLING TEXAS (but NOT in the obvious place, the NM, TEXAS border) posted by Ken Waldrup, DVM, PhD on December 15, 2003 at 3:43 pm:
HEllo Dr. Waldrup,
thank you for your comments and time to come to this board.
Ken Waldrup, DVM, PhD states;
> it is painfully obvious that you do not know or understand the natural distribution of mule deer out there or the rights of the land owners in this state...
TSS states;
I am concerned about all deer/elk not just mule deer, and the rights of land owners (in the case with human/animal TSEs) well i am not sure of the correct terminology, but when the States deer/elk/cattle/sheep/humans are at risk, there should be no rights for land owners in this case. the state should have the right to test those animals. there are too many folks out there that are just plain ignorant about this agent. with an agent such as this, you cannot let landowners (and i am one) dictate human/animal health, especially when you cannot regulate the movement of such animals...
Ken Waldrup, DVM, PhD states;
> Deer and elk from the Guadalupe Peak National Park cannot be collected with federal permission.
TSS states;
I do not understand this? so there is no recourse of action even if every deer/elk was contaminated with CWD in this area (hypothetical)?
Ken Waldrup, DVM, PhD states;
> I am concerned about your insinuation that CWD is a human health risk. We are at a stand-off - you have no proof that it is and I have no definitive proof that it isn't. However I would say that the inferred evidence from Colorado, Wyoming and Wisconsin suggests that CWD is not a human health concern (i.e. no evidence of an increased incidence of human brain disorders within the CWD "endemic" areas of these states)...
TSS states;
NEXT, let's have a look at the overall distribution of CWD in Free-Ranging Cervids and see where the CWD cluster in NM WSMR borders TEXAS;
Current Distribution of Chronic Wasting Disease in Free-Ranging Cervids
 
 
 
 
 
NOW, the MAP of the Exoregion where the samples were taken to test for CWD;
CWD SURVEILLANCE SAMPLE SUBMISSIONS TEXAS
 
 
 
 
 
Ecoregions of TEXAS
 
 
 
 
 
IF you look at the area around the NM WSMR where the CWD cluster was and where it borders TEXAS, that ecoregion is called Trans Pecos region. Seems if my Geography and my Ciphering is correct ;-) that region only tested 55% of it's goal. THE most important area on the MAP and they only test some 96 samples, this in an area that has found some 7 positive animals? NOW if we look at the only other border where these deer from NM could cross the border into TEXAS, this area is called the High Plains ecoregion, and again, we find that the sampling for CWD was pathetic. HERE we find that only 9% of it's goal of CWD sampling was met, only 16 samples were tested from some 175 that were suppose to be sampled.
 
 
AS i said before;
 
 
> SADLY, they have not tested enough from the total population to
 
 
> know if CWD is in Texas or not.
 
 
BUT now, I will go one step further and state categorically that they are not trying to find it. just the opposite it seems, they are waiting for CWD to find them, as with BSE/TSE in cattle, and it will eventually...
 
 
snip...end...TSS
 
 
===============================
 
 
 
Ken Waldrup, DVM, PhD (host25-207.tahc.state.tx.us)
 
 
 
WROTE ON
 
 
 
Date: December 15, 2003 at 3:43 pm PST
 
 
 
With regard to your comment about Texas NOT looking for CWD along the New Mexico border, it is painfully obvious that you do not know or understand the natural distribution of mule deer out there or the rights of the land owners in this state. As of 15 December 2003, a total of 42 deer had been sampled from what we call "Trans-Pecos", beyond the Pecos River. ...END (SEE FULL EMAIL ABOVE)...END
 
 
 
 
NOW WHAT IS SO PAINFULLY OBVIOUS IS THAT THE STATE OF NEW MEXICO, 10 years, one decade since I kept trying to warn them, the state of New Mexico forced Texas hand, humiliated them enough, to finally force them to Test right where I wanted them too, tried to tell them too, 10 years previously, NOW what is so painfully obvious Dr. Ken Waldrup DVM PhD TAHC ?? is that you were wrong, sadly wrong. ...
 
 
 
 
 
Monday, February 11, 2013
 
TEXAS CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD Four New Positives Found in Trans Pecos
 
 
 
 
yep, while the Texas deer czar dr. dough was off to Wisconsin pushing the privately owned shooting pen industry (livestock cervids industry), Texas fell to CWD, and Texas just reported 4 more CWD postives. ...
 
 
 
for your information...
 
 
 
According to Wisconsin’s White-Tailed Deer Trustee Dr. James Kroll, people who call for more public hunting opportunities are “pining for socialism.” He further states, “(Public) Game management is the last bastion of communism.”
 
 
 
“Game Management,” says James Kroll, driving to his high-fenced, two-hundred-acre spread near Nacogdoches, “is the last bastion of communism.” Kroll, also known as Dr. Deer, is the director of the Forestry Resources Institute of Texas at Stephen F. Austin State University, and the “management” he is referring to is the sort practiced by the State of Texas. The 55-year-old Kroll is the leading light in the field of private deer management as a means to add value to the land. His belief is so absolute that some detractors refer to him as Dr. Dough, implying that his eye is on the bottom line more than on the natural world.

 
Kroll, who has been the foremost proponent of deer ranching in Texas for more than thirty years, doesn’t mind the controversy and certainly doesn’t fade in the heat. People who call for more public lands are “cocktail conservationists,” he says, who are really pining for socialism. He calls national parks “wildlife ghettos” and flatly accuses the government of gross mismanagement. He argues that his relatively tiny acreage, marked by eight-foot fences and posted signs warning off would-be poachers, is a better model for keeping what’s natural natural while making money off the land.
 
 
 
Tuesday, July 10, 2012
Dr. James C. Kroll Texas deer czar final report on Wisconsin
 
 
Friday, June 01, 2012
*** TEXAS DEER CZAR TO WISCONSIN ASK TO EXPLAIN COMMENTS
 
 
Thursday, March 29, 2012
TEXAS DEER CZAR SAYS WISCONSIN DNR NOT DOING ENOUGH ABOUT CWD LIKE POT CALLING KETTLE BLACK
 
 
Tuesday, July 10, 2012
Chronic Wasting Disease Detected in Far West Texas
 
 
Monday, February 11, 2013
TEXAS CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD Four New Positives Found in Trans Pecos
 
 
Monday, November 12, 2012
NJ S2024 - Establishes licensing program in Department of Agriculture for farmed deer and other cervids in New Jersey
 
 
Friday, February 03, 2012
Wisconsin Farm-Raised Deer Farms and CWD there from 2012 report Singeltary et al
 
 
Thursday, February 09, 2012
Colorado Farm-Raised Deer Farms and CWD there from 2012 report Singeltary et al
 
 
Tuesday, February 14, 2012
Oppose Indiana House Bill 1265 game farming cervids
 
 
Monday, February 13, 2012
Stop White-tailed Deer Farming from Destroying Tennessee’s Priceless Wild Deer Herd oppose HB3164
 
 
Wednesday, February 15, 2012
West Virginia Deer Farming Bill backed by deer farmers advances, why ? BE WARNED CWD
 
 
Wednesday, February 29, 2012
Sen. Tommy Gollott Mississippi proposes another bill to allow CWD in Mississippi via Game Farms
 
 
Wednesday, March 21, 2012
MICHIGAN SENATE BILL 27 TURNS OVER GAME FARMS and CWD RISK FACTORS THERE FROM, TO DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE $
 
 
Friday, March 16, 2012
OHIO TURNS OVER CERVID GAME FARMS (and CWD risk) TO DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, GOD HELP THEM
As Passed by the Senate
129th General Assembly Regular Session 2011-2012 Am. H. B. No. 389
 
 
 
 
Ohio ranks #3 in Deer and Elk Farms 2010
Deer farms in 82 of 88 counties in Ohio
 
 
Ohio’s Fatal Attractions
An overview of captive wildlife issues in Ohio
April 4, 2011
Updated March 20, 2012
 
 
Monday, June 11, 2012
OHIO Captive deer escapees and non-reporting
 
 
 
Saturday, February 04, 2012
Wisconsin 16 age limit on testing dead deer Game Farm CWD Testing Protocol Needs To Be Revised
 
 
 
 
 
Tuesday, February 14, 2012
Oppose Indiana House Bill 1265 game farming cervidsOppose Indiana House Bill 1265 game farming cervids
 


 
NOW, WHO CAPTURES ALL THOSE POTENTIAL CWD SUSPECT ESCAPEES FROM THESE SHOOTING PENS, AFTER THEY ESCAPE ??
 
 
 
that’s a good question. let’s see how Pennsylvania does it ;
Sunday, January 06, 2013
USDA TO PGC ONCE CAPTIVES ESCAPE
"it‘s no longer its business.”
 
 
Wednesday, November 14, 2012
PENNSYLVANIA 2012 THE GREAT ESCAPE OF CWD INVESTIGATION MOVES INTO LOUISIANA and INDIANA
 
 
Pennsylvania CWD number of deer exposed and farms there from much greater than first thought
Published: Wednesday, October 17, 2012, 10:44 PM Updated: Wednesday, October 17, 2012, 11:33 PM
 
 
Tuesday, October 23, 2012
PA Captive deer from CWD-positive farm roaming free
 
 
Saturday, October 6, 2012
*** TRANSMISSION, DIFFERENTIATION, AND PATHOBIOLOGY OF TRANSMISSIBLE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES 2011 Annual Report
 
Thursday, February 14, 2013
The Many Faces of Mad Cow Disease Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy BSE and TSE prion disease
 
Wednesday, February 20, 2013
World Organization for Animal Health Recommends United States' BSE Risk Status Be Upgraded
Statement from Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack:
 
Wednesday, February 06, 2013
TAHC Continues Efforts to Eradicate Scrapie
 
 
LANCET INFECTIOUS DISEASE JOURNAL
Volume 3, Number 8 01 August 2003
Tracking spongiform encephalopathies in North America
Xavier Bosch
 
 
Thursday, February 21, 2013
National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center Cases Examined January 16, 2013
 
Tuesday, March 05, 2013
A closer look at prion strains Characterization and important implications Prion
7:2, 99–108; March/April 2013; © 2013 Landes Bioscience
 
Tuesday, March 5, 2013
Use of Materials Derived From Cattle in Human Food and Cosmetics; Reopening of the Comment Period FDA-2004-N-0188-0051
(TSS SUBMISSION) FDA believes current regulation protects the public from BSE but reopens comment period due to new studies
 
TSS


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