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Rep. Matt Ubelhor of Bloomfield is going to amend Senate Bill 487 to include the legalization of “canned” deer hunti

Posted Mar 23 2013 12:46pm
Sent: Saturday, March 23, 2013 11:08 AM
 
 
 
Subject: Rep. Matt Ubelhor of Bloomfield is going to amend Senate Bill 487 to include the legalization of “canned” deer hunting operations in Indiana

Indiana must say no to canned hunting
Mar 22, 2013
In a recent article in The Indianapolis Star, we have learned that once again an effort is being made by some legislators to legalize canned deer hunting in this state. This is the shooting of farm-raised domesticated whitetail deer and elk in fenced enclosures. As sportsmen and women we know that these animals have been bred specifically for abnormally large antlers and exhibit little to no flight instincts which you would expect of a wild animal. In other words, they are tame.
It has been reported that Rep. Matt Ubelhor of Bloomfield is going to amend Senate Bill 487 to include the legalization of “canned” deer hunting operations in Indiana. Rep. Ubelhor authored a bill earlier in the session but it failed to get a hearing as there was an intense media focus on the Connersville couple and “Dani” the deer. That saga ended with Gov. Mike Pence requesting that the DNR drop the charges against the couple or a pardon for Dani’s saviors.
Now ironically, as reported by The Star, Gov. Pence says that he is open to the idea of captive or “canned” deer hunting in Indiana. This is a reverse of previous Gov. Mitch Daniels’ position. In 2006, then Gov. Daniels strongly condemned “canned” hunting and signed into law rules to clarify and ban the practice that was always considered illegal by the state. Gov. Pence, it seems, believes that these businesses, five which still exist because of a pending lawsuit, “were allowed but then had the rug pulled out from under them.” The rug has not been pulled out from under them. The DNR has always had rules against these practices as evidence of legislative efforts by Rep. Bill Friend since 1999 on behalf of his constituent Russ Beller who was convicted in federal court in 2005 for running illegal canned hunts.
Sportsmen and women believe you don’t shoot farm animals and we are greatly concerned about disease risk to Indiana’s wild deer. Twenty-three states have Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), a fatal deer disease present in either their wild or captive herds, or both. It is believed movement of deer to and from captive facilities is the primary reason the disease is spreading across this country. Cost to States’ agencies and taxpayers are astronomical. Wisconsin has spent over $50 million in an effort to manage CWD disease. In Indiana we have had tuberculous found in several captive deer facilities, a Harrison County hunting facility, a Wayne County farm, and a Franklin County farm. As a result of the TB found, many wild deer had to be shot by sharpshooters and tested. We also learned last year, as reported by The Star, several farm-raised captive deer brought into Indiana from Pennsylvania had been exposed to CWD. When state authorities traced the deer to an Indiana captive deer farm, it was found that several of the deer had escaped. To date, not all the deer have been recovered for CWD testing. Until all the escaped deer are found and all tested for CWD, it will not be known whether CWD has spread to Indiana.
Tell your legislators to say “No” to “canned hunting” in Indiana. The risk to wild deer is too great and the hunting ethics too poor for Hoosiers.
Please let Gov. Pence and your legislators know this is not what Indiana wants or needs.
Doug Allman
Indiana Wildlife Federation
Gene Hopkins
Indiana Sportsman’s Roundtable
Joe Bacon
Indiana Deer Hunter Association
James Turpin
Quality Deer Management Association
Herb Higgins
Indiana Bowhunter Association
Chuck Bauer
Indiana Division of the Izaak Walton League of America
Published: March 22, 2013 3:00 a.m.
Captive deer hunts may be added to Senate bill
snip...
Sen. Brent Steele, R-Bedford – the author of the Senate bill where an amendment might be added – said from what he has seen of the amendment it is not a widespread expansion of the activity.
He believes it is focused on allowing the four existing facilities to continue to operate.
A move to legalize those operations legislatively could indicate a change in the posture of the case but Steele said he didn’t know the details.
“If the amendment is non-controversial and doesn’t damage my bill while maintaining the status quo I would probably consent to it,” he said.
Kara Brooks, press secretary for Gov. Mike Pence, said he is “concerned with an expansion of high-fence hunting, but is keeping an open mind about legislative efforts to permit existing facilities to continue to operate.”
Rep. Sean Eberhart, R-Shelbyville, chairs the House Natural Resources Committee and said he hasn’t seen any possible amendment. He noted members of the committee – including Ubelhor – are free to offer amendments for the committee to discuss.
He was one legislator to receive $1,000 from the deer and elk PAC, as well as Ubelhor and Steele.
“We get money from a lot of different groups but we vote according to our constituent base and our personal thoughts,” Eberhart said. “Campaign contributions have no bearing on my vote.”
>>> Indiana must say no to canned hunting
I agree 100%. please see why ;
INDIANA 20 DEER ESCAPE TROPHY BUCK GAME FARM STATE OFFICIALS FEAR CWD RISK TO WILD
Escaped deer pose risk of spreading disease in Indiana State wildlife officials fear the missing animals could have been exposed to fatal ailment 9:30 PM, Oct 19, 2012 Deer hunters in four southeastern Indiana counties have been given an unusual directive by state wildlife officials: If you see a deer with a yellow tag in its ear, kill it.
And call a biologist.
The deer, say Department of Natural Resources officials, may be infected with chronic wasting disease. ...
Friday, February 03, 2012
Long kills controversial fenced hunting bill INDIANA
CAN INDIANA AFFORD THIS $$$
and this was just one cwd infected game farm, with the most highest documented cwd infection rate ever recorded i.e. 80% CWD infection rate ;
Tuesday, December 20, 2011
CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD WISCONSIN Almond Deer (Buckhorn Flats) Farm Update DECEMBER 2011
The CWD infection rate was nearly 80%, the highest ever in a North American captive herd.
RECOMMENDATION: That the Board approve the purchase of 80 acres of land for $465,000 for the Statewide Wildlife Habitat Program in Portage County and approve the restrictions on public use of the site.
Form 1100-001 (R 2/11) NATURAL RESOURCES BOARD AGENDA ITEM
SUBJECT: Information Item: Almond Deer Farm Update
FOR: DECEMBER 2011 BOARD MEETING TUESDAY TO BE PRESENTED BY TITLE: Tami Ryan, Wildlife Health Section Chief
SUMMARY:
2012 CDC REPORT ON CWD
Volume 18, Number 3—March 2012 Synopsis Occurrence, Transmission, and Zoonotic Potential of Chronic Wasting Disease
snip...
Prevalence and Surveillance
Originally recognized only in southeastern Wyoming and northeastern Colorado, USA, CWD was reported in Canada in 1996 and Wisconsin in 2001 and continues to be identified in new geographic locations (Figure 1, panel A). CWD has been identified in free-ranging cervids in 15 US states and 2 Canadian provinces and in ≈100 captive herds in 15 states and provinces and in South Korea (Figure 1, panel B).
snip...
CWD surveillance programs are now in place in almost all US states and Canadian provinces (Figure 2, panel A). More than 1,060,000 free-ranging cervids have reportedly been tested for CWD (Figure 2, panel B) and ≈6,000 cases have been identified (Figure 2, panel C) according to data from state and provincial wildlife agencies.
snip...
Testing of captive cervids is routine in most states and provinces, but varies considerably in scope from mandatory testing of all dead animals to voluntary herd certification programs or mandatory testing of only animals suspected of dying of CWD.
snip...
Long-term effects of CWD on cervid populations and ecosystems remain unclear as the disease continues to spread and prevalence increases. In captive herds, CWD might persist at high levels and lead to complete herd destruction in the absence of human culling. Epidemiologic modeling suggests the disease could have severe effects on free-ranging deer populations, depending on hunting policies and environmental persistence (8,9). CWD has been associated with large decreases in free-ranging mule deer populations in an area of high CWD prevalence (Boulder, Colorado, USA) (5). In addition, CWD-infected deer are selectively preyed upon by mountain lions (5), and may also be more vulnerable to vehicle collisions (10). Long-term effects of the disease may vary considerably geographically, not only because of local hunting policies, predator populations, and human density (e.g., vehicular collisions) but also because of local environmental factors such as soil type (11) and local cervid population factors, such as genetics and movement patterns (S.E. Saunders, unpub. data).
snip...
Controlling the spread of CWD, especially by human action, is a more attainable goal than eradication. Human movement of cervids has likely led to spread of CWD in facilities for captive animals, which has most likely contributed to establishment of new disease foci in free-ranging populations (Figure 1, panel A). Thus, restrictions on human movement of cervids from disease-endemic areas or herds continue to be warranted. Anthropogenic factors that increase cervid congregation such as baiting and feeding should also be restricted to reduce CWD transmission. Appropriate disposal of carcasses of animals with suspected CWD is necessary to limit environmental contamination (20), and attractive onsite disposal options such as composting and burial require further investigation to determine contamination risks. The best options for lowering the risk for recurrence in facilities for captive animals with outbreaks are complete depopulation, stringent exclusion of free-ranging cervids, and disinfection of all exposed surfaces. However, even the most extensive decontamination measures may not be sufficient to eliminate the risk for disease recurrence (20; S.E. Saunders et al. unpub. data)
Saturday, March 10, 2012
*** CWD, GAME FARMS, urine, feces, soil, lichens, and banned mad cow protein feed CUSTOM MADE for deer and elk
Tuesday, December 18, 2012
*** A Growing Threat How deer breeding could put public trust wildlife at risk
Friday, February 08, 2013
*** Behavior of Prions in the Environment: Implications for Prion Biology
*** Spraker suggested an interesting explanation for the occurrence of CWD. The deer pens at the Foot Hills Campus were built some 30-40 years ago by a Dr. Bob Davis. At or abut that time, allegedly, some scrapie work was conducted at this site. When deer were introduced to the pens they occupied ground that had previously been occupied by sheep.
2011
*** After a natural route of exposure, 100% of white-tailed deer were susceptible to scrapie.
SEE MORE USAHA REPORTS HERE, 2012 NOT PUBLISHED YET...TSS
Friday, November 09, 2012
*** Chronic Wasting Disease CWD in cervidae and transmission to other species
Sunday, November 11, 2012
*** Susceptibilities of Nonhuman Primates to Chronic Wasting Disease November 2012
Friday, December 14, 2012
Susceptibility Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in wild cervids to Humans 2005 - December 14, 2012
Monday, March 18, 2013
PROCEEDINGS ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTEENTH ANNUAL MEETING of the UNITED STATES ANIMAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION September 29 – October 5, 2011
Saturday, February 04, 2012
Wisconsin 16 age limit on testing dead deer Game Farm CWD Testing Protocol Needs To Be Revised
Tuesday, June 05, 2012
Captive Deer Breeding Legislation Overwhelmingly Defeated During 2012 Legislative Session
Friday, August 31, 2012
COMMITTEE ON CAPTIVE WILDLIFE AND ALTERNATIVE LIVESTOCK and CWD 2009-2012 a review
Friday, August 24, 2012
Diagnostic accuracy of rectal mucosa biopsy testing for chronic wasting disease within white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) herds in North America
Thursday, February 09, 2012
50 GAME FARMS (to date) IN USA INFECTED WITH CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE
Monday, June 11, 2012
OHIO Captive deer escapees and non-reporting
Friday, March 16, 2012
OHIO TURNS OVER CERVID GAME FARMS (and CWD risk) TO DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, GOD HELP THEM
As Passed by the Senate 129th General Assembly Regular Session 2011-2012 Am. H. B. No. 389
some history on Pennsylvania and CWD ;
Friday, March 01, 2013
Pennsylvania CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE FOUND IN BLAIR AND BEDFORD COUNTIES GAME COMMISSION TO HOLD CWD NEWS CONFERENCE MONDAY, MARCH 4
Thursday, October 11, 2012
Pennsylvania Confirms First Case CWD Adams County Captive Deer Tests Positive
Wednesday, November 07, 2012
PENNSYLVANIA Second Adams County Deer Tests Positive for Chronic Wasting Disease
Tuesday, November 06, 2012
PA Department of Agriculture investigating possible 2nd case of chronic wasting disease
Thursday, November 01, 2012
PA GAME COMMISSION TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETING TO DISCUSS CWD Release #128-12
Tuesday, November 13, 2012
PENNSYLVANIA 2012 THE GREAT ESCAPE OF CWD
Wednesday, November 14, 2012
PENNSYLVANIA 2012 THE GREAT ESCAPE OF CWD INVESTIGATION MOVES INTO LOUISIANA and INDIANA
Pennsylvania CWD number of deer exposed and farms there from much greater than first thought
Published: Wednesday, October 17, 2012, 10:44 PM Updated: Wednesday, October 17, 2012, 11:33 PM
Tuesday, October 23, 2012
PA Captive deer from CWD-positive farm roaming free
HERE, we see why these shooting pen owners some much like the USDA oversight of these game farms ;
USDA TO PGC ONCE CAPTIVES ESCAPE "it‘s no longer its business.”
problem solved $$$...TSS
Sunday, January 06, 2013
USDA TO PGC ONCE CAPTIVES ESCAPE "it‘s no longer its business.”
what happened to the PA deer from the CWD index heard that went to Louisiana ??
or Indiana ??
Friday, February 08, 2013
Pennsylvania Additional Deer Farms Released from Chronic Wasting Disease CWD Quarantines
Friday, February 15, 2013
PENNSYLVANIA CWD UPDATE 9 FARMS ARE STILL UNDER QUARANTINE
Thursday, March 14, 2013
TEXAS DEER BREEDERS CHEER TWO NEW BILLS SB 1444 AND HB 2092 THAT COULD HELP POTENTIALLY ENHANCE CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD
The potential impact of prion diseases on human health was greatly magnified by the recognition that interspecies transfer of BSE to humans by beef ingestion resulted in vCJD. While changes in animal feed constituents and slaughter practices appear to have curtailed vCJD, there is concern that CWD of free-ranging deer and elk in the U.S. might also cross the species barrier. Thus, consuming venison could be a source of human prion disease. Whether BSE and CWD represent interspecies scrapie transfer or are newly arisen prion diseases is unknown. Therefore, the possibility of transmission of prion disease through other food animals cannot be ruled out. There is evidence that vCJD can be transmitted through blood transfusion. There is likely a pool of unknown size of asymptomatic individuals infected with vCJD, and there may be asymptomatic individuals infected with the CWD equivalent. These circumstances represent a potential threat to blood, blood products, and plasma supplies.
TSS
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