Health knowledge made personal
Join this community!
› Share page:
Go
Search posts:

PENNSYLVANIA CAPTIVE CWD INDEX HERD MATE YELLOW *47 STILL RUNNING LOOSE IN INDIANA, YELLOW NUMBER 2 STILL MISSING, AND OTHERS O

Posted Jun 29 2013 4:16pm
 PENNSYLVANIA CAPTIVE CWD INDEX HERD MATE YELLOW *47 STILL RUNNING LOOSE IN INDIANA, YELLOW NUMBER 2 STILL MISSING, AND OTHERS ON THE RUN STILL IN LOUISIANA



 May 31, 2013 at 12:11pm goosepondmonster said:


 I take it the CWD deer is still running loose in Indiana as well?

 Following is a reply I received yesterday via email from Chad Stewart:

 "I believe you were inquiring about the tagged deer that was exposed to CWD from the positive deer in Pennsylvania. To my knowledge, no one has seen that deer since sometime last summer. We had an extensive camera surveillance project occurring down in Jackson County, and failed to get a picture of “Yellow 47”. We did manage to get several pictures of another male, “Yellow 2”, that did not share a pen with the positive deer in PA, but did occupy the same facility in Jackson County as “Yellow 47”. He has not been a consistent visitor to bait, appearing for one day, and then disappearing for several weeks before returning again. Therefore, we have not made any efforts to take him. We currently have pared down our surveillance efforts, but have kept the one camera active where he has been visiting infrequently in hopes that he will return more frequently."

 If anyone sees (in person or on trail cam) one of the Yellow tagged deer I am sure Chad would like to know the particulars as soon as possible. His contact info is:

 Chad Stewart Certified Wildlife Biologist Deer Research Biologist 5596 East State Road 46 Bloomington, Indiana 47401

 email: cstewart@dnr.in.gov p: 812-334-1137 f: 812-339-4807


 END...



 SOURCE


  http://hunt-indiana.com/thread/47061/quarantine-louisiana-index-herd-pennsylvania





 Escaped deer pose risk of spreading disease in Indiana


 State wildlife officials fear the missing animals could have been exposed to fatal ailment

 Twenty deer escaped this spring from a Jackson County farm where trophy bucks with huge antlers are bred and sold to fenced-in, private hunting preserves. Department of Natural Resources officials, may be infected with chronic wasting disease. / (Charlie Nye/The Star)

 Deer hunters in four southeastern Indiana counties have been given an unusual directive by state wildlife officials: If you see a deer with a yellow tag in its ear, kill it.

 And call a biologist.

 The deer, say Department of Natural Resources officials, may be infected with chronic wasting disease.

 The edict comes after 20 deer escaped this spring from a Jackson County farm where trophy bucks with huge antlers are bred and sold to fenced-in, private hunting preserves. Seven of the deer remain unaccounted for.

 Wildlife officials worry about chronic wasting disease spreading here, devastating what is currently a thriving deer population of 500,000 to 1 million animals.

 The disease, which is causing havoc in several states, including Wisconsin, hasn't yet made its way to Indiana. Officials don't think it poses a risk to humans or other livestock.

 DNR spokesman Phil Bloom said the escape highlights a larger issue.

 "This case," he said, "underscores the concern many have about how the commercialization of wildlife and interstate trafficking in wildlife presents a Pandora's box, with the potential spread of a deadly disease that does have some wide-ranging consequences."

 In this case, Bloom said, biologists are hoping those consequences can be minimized with some help from hunters -- and motorists unlucky enough to hit and kill one of the tagged deer.

 The alert not only includes Jackson County, where the release occurred, but also neighboring Bartholomew, Jennings and Scott counties. Licensed hunters and motorists who kill tagged deer are urged to immediately call (812) 837-9536.

 The DNR and the Indiana Board of Animal Health will retrieve the carcass so it can be tested for the disease.

 Bloom said of particular interest are any deer with a yellow ear tag and two numbers on it, or any deer with a tag bearing the prefix "IN 764" followed by another four numbers.

 Hunters who shoot one of the deer will be issued a new license free of charge.

 DNR officials are concerned because a Pennsylvania farm -- where chronic wasting disease was detected -- sold 10 animals to farms in Indiana over the past three years. Bloom said two does were sold to farms in Noble and Whitley counties; the rest went to a farm in Jackson County.

 Some of the Jackson County deer were moved to a fourth facility in Jackson County, where the escape happened.

 Shawn Hanley, president of the Indiana Deer and Elk Farmers' Association, said a storm caused a tree to fall on the farm's fence. A Pennsylvania buck remains on the loose.

 "We have been in contact with the DNR and with the (Indiana Board of Animal Health), and will cooperate fully with attempts to recover the lost animal," Hanley said in an email.

 Citing the ongoing investigation, Bloom declined to release the name of the farms. So did Douglas Metcalf, chief of staff for the Board of Animal Health.

 Meanwhile, Metcalf said, each of the four farms is under quarantine, and the animals are being tested for the disease.

 Of the 20 deer that got loose, Bloom said, 11 were immediately recaptured, one was hit by a car and a bow hunter shot another this fall.

 Rick D. Miller, the owner of the 2.5 Karat Game Ranch in nearby Bartholomew County, says he's outraged by what happened. The farm where the deer escaped, he said, isn't one of the 385 Indiana deer farms that voluntarily allow officials to test their herds for the disease.

 "We don't want these crazy things to happen," said Miller, a former president of the Indiana Deer and Elk Farmers' Association.

 Miller said Indiana's $50 million-a-year game-farming industry has a lot to lose if the disease spreads. And so does he.

 At any given time, Miller says, he keeps between two dozen and 60 elk and white-tail deer on his farm. He collects deer urine to sell. Some hunters buy bottles of the urine as a deer attractant. Big "shooter" bucks can be sold to captive hunt facilities for $1,500 to $2,500.

 Breeding stock can sell for $1,000 to $250,000, depending on the size and genetics of the buck.

 In Indiana, at least, the future of farmers who sell to local game clubs remains unclear. In 2006, the DNR passed rules banning high-fence hunting because the facilities were deemed unsporting and a potential disease risk. The clubs sued in response.

 A judge issued an injunction prohibiting a ban, leaving the facilities in business for the time being.

 Bloom of the DNR said the legal challenges are pending.


 Follow Star reporter Ryan Sabalow at twitter.com/RyanSabalow. Call him at (317) 444-6179.


  http://www.indystar.com/article/20121019/LIFE02/210190361/Escaped-deer-pose-risk-spreading-disease-Indiana?odyssey=tab%7Ctopnews%7Ctext%7CIndyStar.com




 > The edict comes after 20 deer escaped this spring from a Jackson County farm where trophy bucks with huge antlers are bred and sold to fenced-in, private hunting preserves. Seven of the deer remain unaccounted for.



 SNIP...




 OCTOBER 2012



 galthatfishes galthatfishes is offline QDMA Member Join Date: May 2008 Location: PA Posts: 224 Default


 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


 Quote: Originally Posted by Jeff23 View Post @TSS: You can follow the $$ all you want, but you have NO IDEA how inept the PAGC was at handling breeding opertations. They never even did inspections beyond the initial inspection! None. That changed immediately after Dept. of Ag took over. The PAGC wanted their check for the propagators permit and that's it. You really need to drop that point from your argument; it's invalid at best, and silly at worst. Folks, anyone who thinks beauracracy of any kind is going to solve this (or any other) problem is only fooling themselves.


 Well, Jeff- I am going to have to disagree with you. The PGC did a darned good job with the regulation of deer farms. In fact, they did such a good job, our state's deer farmers went running to the legislature and asked for cervid farming to be placed with the PA Department of Agriculture (PDA).


 Hunters protested (I can back this up with Pennsylvana Federation of Sportsman's Clubs position statements, etc); yet the cervid industry; backed with big $ protested and got their wish.


 Hunters warned that when CWD was found in captive herds, it was soon after it was found in the wild populations, especially when single fences were used, and when bedding materials were thrown outside of the fence and not properly disposed of; and when run off from high rain events were able to wash infected soils, feces, etc. outside of the pens.


 I attended a meeting last Wednesday where I brought several of these points up to PDA's Deputy Secretary Meals. He seemed in shock, until their own vet confirmed every word I said.


  http://www.qdma.com/forums/showthread.php?t=53096





 10-26-2012, 01:37 PM


 galthatfishes's Avatar galthatfishes galthatfishes is offline QDMA Member Join Date: May 2008 Location: PA Posts: 224 Default


 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


 By the way. Just a couple of days ago, more "deer" escaped a farm. Can you show me Ag's press release on that Jeff?


 I can show you the police report. Ag will neither confirm nor deny it.



  http://www.qdma.com/forums/showthread.php?t=53096&page=3


  http://www.qdma.com/forums/showthread.php?t=53096&page=4


  http://www.qdma.com/forums/showthread.php?t=53096&page=5


  http://www.qdma.com/forums/showthread.php?t=53096&page=6


  http://www.qdma.com/forums/showthread.php?t=53096&page=7


  http://www.qdma.com/forums/showthread.php?t=53096&page=8






 Tuesday, May 28, 2013

 Chronic Wasting Disease CWD quarantine Louisiana via CWD index herd Pennsylvania Update May 28, 2013

 6 doe from Pennsylvania CWD index herd still on the loose in Louisiana, quarantine began on October 18, 2012, still ongoing, Lake Charles premises.

  http://www.chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2013/05/chronic-wasting-disease-cwd-quarantine.html






 Tuesday, December 18, 2012

 A Growing Threat How deer breeding could put public trust wildlife at risk

  http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/12/a-growing-threat-how-deer-breeding.html





 Monday, June 24, 2013

 The Effects of Chronic Wasting Disease on the Pennsylvania Cervid Industry Following its Discovery

  http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2013/06/the-effects-of-chronic-wasting-disease.html





 Thursday, June 20, 2013

 atypical, BSE, CWD, Scrapie, Captive Farmed shooting pens (livestock), Wild Cervids, Rectal Mucosa Biopsy 2012 USAHA Proceedings, and CJD TSE prion Update

  http://transmissiblespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/2013/06/atypical-bse-cwd-scrapie-captive-farmed.html





 Sunday, June 09, 2013

 Missouri House forms 13-member Interim Committee on the Cause and Spread of Chronic Wasting Disease CWD

  http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2013/06/missouri-house-forms-13-member-interim.html





 Tuesday, April 16, 2013

 Cervid Industry Unites To Set Direction for CWD Reform and seem to ignore their ignorance and denial in their role in spreading Chronic Wasting Disease

  http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2013/04/cervid-industry-unites-to-set-direction.html





 Sunday, January 06, 2013

 USDA TO PGC ONCE CAPTIVES ESCAPE "it‘s no longer its business.”

  http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2013/01/usda-to-pgc-once-captives-escape-its-no.html





 more on Great Escape of CWD from Pennsylvania 2012 coming out of Indiana




 A farm in Pennsylvania, where chronic wasting disease was detected, has sold 10 animals to farms in Indiana over the past three years. DNR spokesman Phil Bloom said two were sold to farms in Noble and Whitley counties; the rest went to two facilities in Jackson County, one of which is the site of the escape.


  http://www.chestertontribune.com/Environment/indiana_enlists_hunters_to_help.htm





 see full text and more ;


 Wednesday, November 14, 2012

 PENNSYLVANIA 2012 THE GREAT ESCAPE OF CWD INVESTIGATION MOVES INTO LOUISIANA and INDIANA

  http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/11/pennsylvania-2012-great-escape-of-cwd_14.html




 Tuesday, October 23, 2012

 PA Captive deer from CWD-positive farm roaming free

  http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/10/pa-captive-deer-from-cwd-positive-farm.html




 Pennsylvania CWD number of deer exposed and farms there from much greater than first thought

 Published: Wednesday, October 17, 2012, 10:44 PM Updated: Wednesday, October 17, 2012, 11:33 PM

  http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/10/pennsylvania-cwd-number-of-deer-exposed.html




 Friday, October 26, 2012

 CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD PENNSYLVANIA GAME FARMS, URINE ATTRACTANT PRODUCTS, BAITING, AND MINERAL LICKS

  http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/10/chronic-wasting-disease-cwd.html




 Thursday, October 11, 2012

 Pennsylvania Confirms First Case CWD Adams County Captive Deer Tests Positive

  http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/10/pennsylvania-confirms-first-case-cwd.html





 CWD TO HUMANS ??



 Cross-sequence transmission of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease creates a new prion strain



 Date: August 25, 2007 at 12:42 pm PST

 our results raise the possibility that CJD cases classified as VV1 may include cases caused by iatrogenic transmission of sCJD-MM1 prions or food-borne infection by type 1 prions from animals, e.g., chronic wasting disease prions in cervid. In fact, two CJD-VV1 patients who hunted deer or consumed venison have been reported (40, 41). The results of the present study emphasize the need for traceback studies and careful re-examination of the biochemical properties of sCJD-VV1 prions.


  http://www.jbc.org/





 *** The potential impact of prion diseases on human health was greatly magnified by the recognition that interspecies transfer of BSE to humans by beef ingestion resulted in vCJD. While changes in animal feed constituents and slaughter practices appear to have curtailed vCJD, there is concern that CWD of free-ranging deer and elk in the U.S. might also cross the species barrier. Thus, consuming venison could be a source of human prion disease. Whether BSE and CWD represent interspecies scrapie transfer or are newly arisen prion diseases is unknown. Therefore, the possibility of transmission of prion disease through other food animals cannot be ruled out. There is evidence that vCJD can be transmitted through blood transfusion. There is likely a pool of unknown size of asymptomatic individuals infected with vCJD, and there may be asymptomatic individuals infected with the CWD equivalent. These circumstances represent a potential threat to blood, blood products, and plasma supplies.

  http://cdmrp.army.mil/prevfunded/nprp/NPRP_Summit_Final_Report.pdf




 The chances of a person or domestic animal contracting CWD are “extremely remote,” Richards said. The possibility can’t be ruled out, however. “One could look at it like a game of chance,” he explained. “The odds (of infection) increase over time because of repeated exposure. That’s one of the downsides of having CWD in free-ranging herds: We’ve got this infectious agent out there that we can never say never to in terms of (infecting) people and domestic livestock.”

  https://www.avma.org/News/JAVMANews/Pages/121201a.aspx




 P35

 ADAPTATION OF CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE (CWD) INTO HAMSTERS, EVIDENCE OF A WISCONSIN STRAIN OF CWD

 Subclinical infection was established with the other primary passages based on the detection of PrPCWD in the brains of hamsters and the successful disease transmission upon second passage. Second and third passage data, when compared to transmission studies using different CWD inocula (Raymond et al., 2007) indicate that the CWD agent present in the Wisconsin white-tailed deer population is different than the strain(s) present in elk, mule-deer and white-tailed deer from the western United States endemic region.

  http://www.istitutoveneto.it/prion_09/Abstracts_09.pdf




 PPo3-7:

 Prion Transmission from Cervids to Humans is Strain-dependent

 Here we report that a human prion strain that had adopted the cervid prion protein (PrP) sequence through passage in cervidized transgenic mice efficiently infected transgenic mice expressing human PrP, indicating that the species barrier from cervid to humans is prion strain-dependent and humans can be vulnerable to novel cervid prion strains. Preliminary results on CWD transmission in transgenic mice expressing human PrP-129V will also be discussed.

 Acknowledgement Supported by NINDS NS052319 and NIA AG14359.




 PPo2-27:

 Generation of a Novel form of Human PrPSc by Inter-species Transmission of Cervid Prions

 Our findings suggest that CWD prions have the capability to infect humans, and that this ability depends on CWD strain adaptation, implying that the risk for human health progressively increases with the spread of CWD among cervids.




 PPo2-7:

 Biochemical and Biophysical Characterization of Different CWD Isolates

 This confirmed structural differences in the PrPTSE of at least two disinct CWD isolates. The data presented here substantiate and expand previous reports on the existence of different CWD strains.

  http://www.prion2010.org/bilder/prion_2010_program_latest_w_posters_4_.pdf?139&PHPSESSID=a30a38202cfec579000b77af81be3099



 2012



 Envt.06:

 Zoonotic Potential of CWD: Experimental Transmissions to Non-Human Primates

 Since CWD prion strains are highly lymphotropic, suggesting an adaptation of these agents after peripheral exposure, a parallel set of four monkeys was inoculated with CWD-infected cervid brains using the oral route. Nearly four years post-exposure, monkeys exposed to CWD-related prion strains remain asymptomatic. In contrast, bovinized and humanized transgenic mice showed signs of infection, suggesting that CWD-related prion strains may be capable of crossing the cattle-to-primate species barrier. Comparisons with transmission results and incubation periods obtained after exposure to other cattle prion strains (c-BSE, BSE-L, BSE-H and cattle-adapted TME) will also be presented, in order to evaluate the respective risks of each strain.



 Envt.07:

 Pathological Prion Protein (PrPTSE) in Skeletal Muscles of Farmed and Free Ranging White-Tailed Deer Infected with Chronic Wasting Disease

 The presence and seeding activity of PrPTSE in skeletal muscle from CWD-infected cervids suggests prevention of such tissue in the human diet as a precautionary measure for food safety, pending on further clarification of whether CWD may be transmissible to humans.

  http://www.landesbioscience.com/journals/prion/Prion5-Supp-PrionEnvironment.pdf?nocache=1333529975



 Sunday, August 19, 2012

 Susceptibility of cattle to the agent of chronic wasting disease from elk after intracranial inoculation 2012

 Research Project: TRANSMISSION, DIFFERENTIATION, AND PATHOBIOLOGY OF TRANSMISSIBLE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES Location: Virus and Prion Research Unit

  http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/08/susceptibility-of-cattle-to-agent-of.html



 PO-081: Chronic wasting disease in the cat— Similarities to feline spongiform encephalopathy (FSE)



  http://www.landesbioscience.com/journals/prion/04-Prion6-2-Pathogenesis-and-pathology.pdf



  http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/05/chronic-wasting-disease-cwd-prion2012.html





http://www.landesbioscience.com/journals/prion/article/15898/Prion5-Supp-PrionBiology.pdf?nocache=804212569






  http://felinespongiformencephalopathyfse.blogspot.com/2011/08/susceptibility-of-domestic-cats-to-cwd.html



 Thursday, May 31, 2012

 CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD PRION2012 Aerosol, Inhalation transmission, Scrapie, cats, species barrier, burial, and more

  http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/05/chronic-wasting-disease-cwd-prion2012.html



 PO-081: Chronic wasting disease in the cat— Similarities to feline spongiform encephalopathy (FSE)

  http://www.landesbioscience.com/journals/prion/04-Prion6-2-Pathogenesis-and-pathology.pdf




 Friday, November 09, 2012

 *** Chronic Wasting Disease CWD in cervidae and transmission to other species

  http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/11/chronic-wasting-disease-cwd-in-cervidae.html





 Sunday, November 11, 2012

 *** Susceptibilities of Nonhuman Primates to Chronic Wasting Disease November 2012

  http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/11/susceptibilities-of-nonhuman-primates.html





 Friday, December 14, 2012

 *** Susceptibility Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in wild cervids to Humans 2005 - December 14, 2012

  http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/12/susceptibility-chronic-wasting-disease.html





 Saturday, March 09, 2013

 Chronic Wasting Disease in Bank Voles: Characterisation of the Shortest Incubation Time Model for Prion Diseases

  http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2013/03/chronic-wasting-disease-in-bank-voles.html





 pens, pens, PENS ??





 *** Spraker suggested an interesting explanation for the occurrence of CWD. The deer pens at the Foot Hills Campus were built some 30-40 years ago by a Dr. Bob Davis. At or abut that time, allegedly, some scrapie work was conducted at this site. When deer were introduced to the pens they occupied ground that had previously been occupied by sheep.



  http://collections.europarchive.org/tna/20080102193705/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/mb/m11b/tab01.pdf




 now, decades later ;




 2012



 PO-039: A comparison of scrapie and chronic wasting disease in white-tailed deer



 snip...



 After a natural route of exposure, 100% of WTD were susceptible to scrapie. Deer developed clinical signs of wasting and mental depression and were necropsied from 28 to 33 months PI. Tissues from these deer were positive for PrPSc by IHC and WB. Similar to IC inoculated deer, samples from these deer exhibited two different molecular profiles: samples from obex resembled CWD whereas those from cerebrum were similar to the original scrapie inoculum. On further examination by WB using a panel of antibodies, the tissues from deer with scrapie exhibit properties differing from tissues either from sheep with scrapie or WTD with CWD. Samples from WTD with CWD or sheep with scrapie are strongly immunoreactive when probed with mAb P4, however, samples from WTD with scrapie are only weakly immunoreactive. In contrast, when probed with mAb’s 6H4 or SAF 84, samples from sheep with scrapie and WTD with CWD are weakly immunoreactive and samples from WTD with scrapie are strongly positive. This work demonstrates that WTD are highly susceptible to sheep scrapie, but on first passage, scrapie in WTD is differentiable from CWD.



  http://www.landesbioscience.com/journals/prion/03-Prion6-2-Transmission-and-strains.pdf





 2011



 *** After a natural route of exposure, 100% of white-tailed deer were susceptible to scrapie.



  http://www.usaha.org/Portals/6/Reports/2011/report-cwal-2011.pdf





 Scrapie in Deer: Comparisons and Contrasts to Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD)



 Justin J. Greenlee of the Virus and Prion Diseases Research Unit, National Animal Disease Center, ARS, USDA, Ames, IA provided a presentation on scrapie and CWD in inoculated deer. Interspecies transmission studies afford the opportunity



 After a natural route of exposure, 100% of white-tailed deer were susceptible to scrapie. Deer developed clinical signs of wasting and mental depression and were necropsied from 28 to 33 months PI. Tissues from these deer were positive for scrapie by IHC and WB. Tissues with PrPSc immunoreactivity included brain, tonsil, retropharyngeal and mesenteric lymph nodes, hemal node, Peyer’s patches, and spleen. While two WB patterns have been detected in brain regions of deer inoculated by the natural route, unlike the IC inoculated deer, the pattern similar to the scrapie inoculum predominates.



  http://www.usaha.org/Portals/6/Reports/2011/report-cwal-2011.pdf





 2011 Annual Report



 Research Project: TRANSMISSION, DIFFERENTIATION, AND PATHOBIOLOGY OF TRANSMISSIBLE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES Location: Virus and Prion Research Unit 2011 Annual Report



 In Objective 1, Assess cross-species transmissibility of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) in livestock and wildlife, numerous experiments assessing the susceptibility of various TSEs in different host species were conducted. Most notable is deer inoculated with scrapie, which exhibits similarities to chronic wasting disease (CWD) in deer suggestive of sheep scrapie as an origin of CWD.



 snip...



 4.Accomplishments 1. Deer inoculated with domestic isolates of sheep scrapie. Scrapie-affected deer exhibit 2 different patterns of disease associated prion protein. In some regions of the brain the pattern is much like that observed for scrapie, while in others it is more like chronic wasting disease (CWD), the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy typically associated with deer. This work conducted by ARS scientists at the National Animal Disease Center, Ames, IA suggests that an interspecies transmission of sheep scrapie to deer may have been the origin of CWD. This is important for husbandry practices with both captive deer, elk and sheep for farmers and ranchers attempting to keep their herds and flocks free of CWD and scrapie.



  http://ars.usda.gov/research/projects/projects.htm?ACCN_NO=411467&showpars=true&fy=2011





 White-tailed Deer are Susceptible to Scrapie by Natural Route of Infection



 snip...



 This work demonstrates for the first time that white-tailed deer are susceptible to sheep scrapie by potential natural routes of inoculation. In-depth analysis of tissues will be done to determine similarities between scrapie in deer after intracranial and oral/intranasal inoculation and chronic wasting disease resulting from similar routes of inoculation.



 see full text ;



  http://www.usaha.org/Portals/6/Reports/2010/report-cwal-2010.pdf







 *** NOR IS THE FDA recalling this CWD positive elk meat for the well being of the dead elk ;



 Wednesday, March 18, 2009 Noah’s Ark Holding, LLC, Dawson, MN RECALL Elk products contain meat derived from an elk confirmed to have CWD NV, CA, TX, CO, NY, UT, FL, OK RECALLS AND FIELD CORRECTIONS: FOODS CLASS II



 ___________________________________



  http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/ENFORCE/2009/ENF01099.html




 Wednesday, March 18, 2009



 Noah's Ark Holding, LLC, Dawson, MN RECALL Elk products contain meat derived from an elk confirmed to have CWD NV, CA, TX, CO, NY, UT, FL, OK RECALLS AND FIELD CORRECTIONS: FOODS CLASS II





  http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/ENFORCE/2009/ENF01099.html






  http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/03/noahs-ark-holding-llc-dawson-mn-recall.html






 Friday, December 14, 2012



 DEFRA U.K. What is the risk of Chronic Wasting Disease CWD being introduced into Great Britain? A Qualitative Risk Assessment October 2012


 snip...



 In the USA, under the Food and Drug Administration’s BSE Feed Regulation (21 CFR 589.2000) most material (exceptions include milk, tallow, and gelatin) from deer and elk is prohibited for use in feed for ruminant animals. With regards to feed for non-ruminant animals, under FDA law, CWD positive deer may not be used for any animal feed or feed ingredients.




 *** For elk and deer considered at high risk for CWD, the FDA recommends that these animals do not enter the animal feed system.




 *** However, this recommendation is guidance and not a requirement by law.




 Animals considered at high risk for CWD include:



 1) animals from areas declared to be endemic for CWD and/or to be CWD eradication zones and



 2) deer and elk that at some time during the 60-month period prior to slaughter were in a captive herd that contained a CWD-positive animal.



 Therefore, in the USA, materials from cervids other than CWD positive animals may be used in animal feed and feed ingredients for non-ruminants.



 The amount of animal PAP that is of deer and/or elk origin imported from the USA to GB can not be determined, however, as it is not specified in TRACES. It may constitute a small percentage of the 8412 kilos of non-fish origin processed animal proteins that were imported from US into GB in 2011.



 Overall, therefore, it is considered there is a __greater than negligible risk___ that (nonruminant) animal feed and pet food containing deer and/or elk protein is imported into GB.


 There is uncertainty associated with this estimate given the lack of data on the amount of deer and/or elk protein possibly being imported in these products.



 snip...



 36% in 2007 (Almberg et al., 2011). In such areas, population declines of deer of up to 30 to 50% have been observed (Almberg et al., 2011). In areas of Colorado, the prevalence can be as high as 30% (EFSA, 2011).



 The clinical signs of CWD in affected adults are weight loss and behavioural changes that can span weeks or months (Williams, 2005). In addition, signs might include excessive salivation, behavioural alterations including a fixed stare and changes in interaction with other animals in the herd, and an altered stance (Williams, 2005). These signs are indistinguishable from cervids experimentally infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE).



 Given this, if CWD was to be introduced into countries with BSE such as GB, for example, infected deer populations would need to be tested to differentiate if they were infected with CWD or BSE to minimise the risk of BSE entering the human food-chain via affected venison.



 snip...



 The rate of transmission of CWD has been reported to be as high as 30% and can approach 100% among captive animals in endemic areas (Safar et al., 2008).



 snip...



 In summary, in endemic areas, there is a medium probability that the soil and surrounding environment is contaminated with CWD prions and in a bioavailable form. In rural areas where CWD has not been reported and deer are present, there is a greater than negligible risk the soil is contaminated with CWD prion.



 snip...



 In summary, given the volume of tourists, hunters and servicemen moving between GB and North America, the probability of at least one person travelling to/from a CWD affected area and, in doing so, contaminating their clothing, footwear and/or equipment prior to arriving in GB is greater than negligible. For deer hunters, specifically, the risk is likely to be greater given the increased contact with deer and their environment. However, there is significant uncertainty associated with these estimates.



 snip...



 Therefore, it is considered that farmed and park deer may have a higher probability of exposure to CWD transferred to the environment than wild deer given the restricted habitat range and higher frequency of contact with tourists and returning GB residents.



 snip...

 see full text report here ;

  http://www.defra.gov.uk/animal-diseases/files/qra_chronic-wasting-disease-121029.pdf




 see much more here ;



 Friday, December 14, 2012

 DEFRA U.K. What is the risk of Chronic Wasting Disease CWD being introduced into Great Britain? A Qualitative Risk Assessment October 2012

  http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/12/defra-uk-what-is-risk-of-chronic.html




 Subject: DOCKET-- 03D-0186 -- FDA Issues Draft Guidance on Use of Material From Deer and Elk in Animal Feed; Availability

 Date: Fri, 16 May 2003 11:47:37 -0500

 From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."

 To: fdadockets@oc.fda.gov


  http://madcowfeed.blogspot.com/2008/07/docket-03d-0186-fda-issues-draft.html




 Thursday, June 6, 2013

 BSE TSE PRION USDA FDA MAD COW FEED COMPLIANCE REPORT and NAI, OAI, and VAI ratings as at June 5, 2013

  http://madcowfeed.blogspot.com/2013/06/bse-tse-prion-usda-fda-mad-cow-feed.html





 Tuesday, June 11, 2013

 Weld County Bi-Products dba Fort Morgan Pet Foods 6/1/12 significant deviations from requirements in FDA regulations that are intended to reduce the risk of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) within the United States

  http://madcowfeed.blogspot.com/2013/06/weld-county-bi-products-dba-fort-morgan.html






  http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/






TSS
Post a comment
Write a comment: