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New TAHC Movement Requirements for Species Susceptible to Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD)

Posted Jul 04 2013 10:37am
 
Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) July 3, 2013 New TAHC Movement Requirements for Species Susceptible to Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD)
 
 
 
AUSTIN - The Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) has new intrastate movement requirements in place for elk, red deer, Sika deer, moose and their hybrids, all of which are considered susceptible to Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). White-tailed deer and mule deer are also susceptible species to CWD but remain under the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department's movement regulations.
 
 
 
The new TAHC movement rule replaces the previous rule which applied only to elk and required testing animals based on the number being moved. The TAHC worked closely with cervid industry representatives to develop new rules that provide traceability and CWD surveillance of elk, red deer, Sika deer, moose, and their hybrids, while removing the requirement to sacrifice healthy animals for testing purposes.
 
 
 
When transporting CWD susceptible species, owners are required to apply an official identification device to the animals being moved, complete and submit a CWD Susceptible Species Movement Record, and provide a current estimated inventory of the herd of origin. In addition, owners are required to provide documentation of negative CWD test results on 20% of all eligible mortalities in the herd on an annual basis to the TAHC. Eligible mortalities are those occurring after June 12, 2013, (the effective date of the new rule), in herd members 16 months of age and older, including hunter harvested animals and animals sent to slaughter. The necessary forms, instructions, complete rule and additional information may be obtained at the TAHC website or by contacting a local TAHC Region Office.
 
 
 
Herd owners are not required to meet the 20% mortality testing requirement when transporting animals to a state or federally inspected slaughter facility. These animals count as eligible mortalities for the herd, however, so owners are encouraged to test these animals as well as those harvested by hunters to ensure the herd meets the 20% testing requirement for future movements. Negative CWD results must be obtained on at least one out of five eligible mortalities to qualify a herd to move live animals to another premise.
 
 
 
For a copy of the CWD Susceptible Species Movement Record (TAHC Form 13-05) and the CWD Susceptible Species Inventory Record (TAHC Form 13-06), visit http://www.tahc.texas.gov/animal_health/cwd/cwd.html . Instructions on how to fill out the forms are attached to the forms along with a list of acceptable forms of individual identification. Forms may be filled out online and emailed to CWD_movement@tahc.texas.gov or printed and mailed to the TAHC Central Office in Austin at P.O. Box 12966, Austin, TX 78711-2966.
 
 
 
"With the disclosure of CWD in mule deer in the Hueco Mountains of Texas in 2012, coupled with the newly required designation of red Deer and Sika deer as susceptible species, it is imperative that surveillance is increased in those species and movement of those susceptible species be traceable", said Dr. Greg Hawkins, TAHC Region 4 Director.
 
 
 
To read the rule in detail, visit www.tahc.texas.gov.
 
 
 
Founded in 1893, the Texas Animal Health Commission works to protect the health of all Texas livestock, including: cattle, swine, poultry, sheep, goats, equine animals, and exotic livestock.
 
###
 
 Become a TAHC Insider www.tahc.texas.gov/news
 
Leisa Fletcher, Communications & Public Relations Assistant Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
===================================================
 
 
 
In addition, owners are required to provide documentation of negative CWD test results on 20% of all eligible mortalities in the herd on an annual basis to the TAHC. Eligible mortalities are those occurring after June 12, 2013, (the effective date of the new rule), in herd members 16 months of age and older, including hunter harvested animals and animals sent to slaughter. The necessary forms, instructions, complete rule and additional information may be obtained at the TAHC website or by contacting a local TAHC Region Office.
 
 
 
Herd owners are not required to meet the 20% mortality testing requirement when transporting animals to a state or federally inspected slaughter facility. These animals count as eligible mortalities for the herd, however, so owners are encouraged to test these animals as well as those harvested by hunters to ensure the herd meets the 20% testing requirement for future movements. Negative CWD results must be obtained on at least one out of five eligible mortalities to qualify a herd to move live animals to another premise.
 
 
 
==================================================
 
 
 
 
DOCUMENTATION MUST BE mandatory on ALL eligible mortalities in the herd on an annual basis, of ALL AGES, or the efforts to contain CWD in Texas will be futile...tss
 
 
 
 
 
Saturday, February 04, 2012
 
Wisconsin 16 MONTH age limit on testing dead deer Game Farm CWD Testing Protocol Needs To Be Revised
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tuesday, July 02, 2013
 
*** National Rifle Association and the Unified Sportsman of Florida support a Florida ban on the importation of captive deer and cervids into Florida
 
 




 Monday, June 18, 2012

 

natural cases of CWD in eight Sika deer (Cervus nippon) and five Sika/red deer crossbreeds captive Korea and Experimental oral transmission to red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus)

 


 


 

 

 

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

 

Experimental Oral Transmission of Chronic Wasting Disease to Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus)

 


 

 

 

Friday, November 09, 2012

 

*** Chronic Wasting Disease CWD in cervidae and transmission to other species

 


 

 

 

Sunday, November 11, 2012

 

*** Susceptibilities of Nonhuman Primates to Chronic Wasting Disease November 2012

 


 

 

 

Friday, December 14, 2012

 

Susceptibility Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in wild cervids to Humans 2005 - December 14, 2012

 


 

 
 
Saturday, March 09, 2013

 
Chronic Wasting Disease in Bank Voles: Characterisation of the Shortest Incubation Time Model for Prion Diseases


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2013/03/chronic-wasting-disease-in-bank-voles.html




Sunday, January 22, 2012

Chronic Wasting Disease CWD cervids interspecies transmission


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/01/chronic-wasting-disease-cwd-cervids.html




Thursday, May 31, 2012

CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD PRION2012 Aerosol, Inhalation transmission, Scrapie, cats, species barrier, burial, and more


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/05/chronic-wasting-disease-cwd-prion2012.html
 
 
 
 
 
 
Monday, June 11, 2012
 
OHIO Captive deer escapees and non-reporting
 
 
 
 
 
Friday, September 28, 2012
 
Stray elk renews concerns about deer farm security Minnesota
 
 
 
 
 
Monday, June 17, 2013
 
Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TEXAS UPDATE ON REGULATION RULES
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sunday, June 09, 2013
 
Missouri House forms 13-member Interim Committee on the Cause and Spread of Chronic Wasting Disease CWD
 
 
 
 
 
*** The potential impact of prion diseases on human health was greatly magnified by the recognition that interspecies transfer of BSE to humans by beef ingestion resulted in vCJD. While changes in animal feed constituents and slaughter practices appear to have curtailed vCJD, there is concern that CWD of free-ranging deer and elk in the U.S. might also cross the species barrier. Thus, consuming venison could be a source of human prion disease. Whether BSE and CWD represent interspecies scrapie transfer or are newly arisen prion diseases is unknown. Therefore, the possibility of transmission of prion disease through other food animals cannot be ruled out. There is evidence that vCJD can be transmitted through blood transfusion. There is likely a pool of unknown size of asymptomatic individuals infected with vCJD, and there may be asymptomatic individuals infected with the CWD equivalent. These circumstances represent a potential threat to blood, blood products, and plasma supplies.
 
 
 
 
 
Thursday, June 20, 2013
 
atypical, BSE, CWD, Scrapie, Captive Farmed shooting pens (livestock), Wild Cervids, Rectal Mucosa Biopsy 2012 USAHA Proceedings, and CJD TSE prion Update
 
 
 
 
 
Monday, June 24, 2013
 
The Effects of Chronic Wasting Disease on the Pennsylvania Cervid Industry Following its Discovery
 
 
 
 
 
 
Friday, December 14, 2012
 
 DEFRA U.K. What is the risk of Chronic Wasting Disease CWD being introduced into Great Britain? A Qualitative Risk Assessment October 2012
 
snip...
 
 In the USA, under the Food and Drug Administration’s BSE Feed Regulation (21 CFR 589.2000) most material (exceptions include milk, tallow, and gelatin) from deer and elk is prohibited for use in feed for ruminant animals. With regards to feed for non-ruminant animals, under FDA law, CWD positive deer may not be used for any animal feed or feed ingredients.
 
 
 
*** For elk and deer considered at high risk for CWD, the FDA recommends that these animals do not enter the animal feed system.
 
 
 
*** However, this recommendation is guidance and not a requirement by law.
 
 
 
Animals considered at high risk for CWD include:
 
 1) animals from areas declared to be endemic for CWD and/or to be CWD eradication zones and
 
 2) deer and elk that at some time during the 60-month period prior to slaughter were in a captive herd that contained a CWD-positive animal.
 
 Therefore, in the USA, materials from cervids other than CWD positive animals may be used in animal feed and feed ingredients for non-ruminants.
 
 The amount of animal PAP that is of deer and/or elk origin imported from the USA to GB can not be determined, however, as it is not specified in TRACES. It may constitute a small percentage of the 8412 kilos of non-fish origin processed animal proteins that were imported from US into GB in 2011.
 
 Overall, therefore, it is considered there is a __greater than negligible risk___ that (nonruminant) animal feed and pet food containing deer and/or elk protein is imported into GB.
 
There is uncertainty associated with this estimate given the lack of data on the amount of deer and/or elk protein possibly being imported in these products.
 
 snip...
 
 36% in 2007 (Almberg et al., 2011). In such areas, population declines of deer of up to 30 to 50% have been observed (Almberg et al., 2011). In areas of Colorado, the prevalence can be as high as 30% (EFSA, 2011).
 
 The clinical signs of CWD in affected adults are weight loss and behavioural changes that can span weeks or months (Williams, 2005). In addition, signs might include excessive salivation, behavioural alterations including a fixed stare and changes in interaction with other animals in the herd, and an altered stance (Williams, 2005). These signs are indistinguishable from cervids experimentally infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE).
 
 Given this, if CWD was to be introduced into countries with BSE such as GB, for example, infected deer populations would need to be tested to differentiate if they were infected with CWD or BSE to minimise the risk of BSE entering the human food-chain via affected venison.
 
 snip...
 
 The rate of transmission of CWD has been reported to be as high as 30% and can approach 100% among captive animals in endemic areas (Safar et al., 2008).
 
 snip...
 
 In summary, in endemic areas, there is a medium probability that the soil and surrounding environment is contaminated with CWD prions and in a bioavailable form. In rural areas where CWD has not been reported and deer are present, there is a greater than negligible risk the soil is contaminated with CWD prion.
 
 snip...
 
 In summary, given the volume of tourists, hunters and servicemen moving between GB and North America, the probability of at least one person travelling to/from a CWD affected area and, in doing so, contaminating their clothing, footwear and/or equipment prior to arriving in GB is greater than negligible. For deer hunters, specifically, the risk is likely to be greater given the increased contact with deer and their environment. However, there is significant uncertainty associated with these estimates.
 
 snip...
 
 Therefore, it is considered that farmed and park deer may have a higher probability of exposure to CWD transferred to the environment than wild deer given the restricted habitat range and higher frequency of contact with tourists and returning GB residents.
 
 snip...
 
 see full text report here ;
 
 
 
 
see much more here ;
 
 
 
Friday, December 14, 2012
 
DEFRA U.K. What is the risk of Chronic Wasting Disease CWD being introduced into Great Britain? A Qualitative Risk Assessment October 2012
 
 
 
 
 
Tuesday, June 11, 2013
 
Weld County Bi-Products dba Fort Morgan Pet Foods 6/1/12 significant deviations from requirements in FDA regulations that are intended to reduce the risk of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) within the United States
 
 
 
 
 
Subject: DOCKET-- 03D-0186 -- FDA Issues Draft Guidance on Use of Material From Deer and Elk in Animal Feed; Availability
 
Date: Fri, 16 May 2003 11:47:37 -0500
 
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
 
To: fdadockets@oc.fda.gov
 
 
 
 
 
Saturday, June 29, 2013
 
PENNSYLVANIA CAPTIVE CWD INDEX HERD MATE YELLOW *47 STILL RUNNING LOOSE IN INDIANA, YELLOW NUMBER 2 STILL MISSING, AND OTHERS ON THE RUN STILL IN LOUISIANA
 
 
 
 
 
Tuesday, May 28, 2013
 
Chronic Wasting Disease CWD quarantine Louisiana via CWD index herd Pennsylvania Update May 28, 2013
 
6 doe from Pennsylvania CWD index herd still on the loose in Louisiana, quarantine began on October 18, 2012, still ongoing, Lake Charles premises.
 
 
 
 
 
Tuesday, June 11, 2013
 
CWD GONE WILD, More cervid escapees from more shooting pens on the loose in Pennsylvania
 
 
 
 
 
Wednesday, June 12, 2013
 
CWD now waltzing into Texas from Pennsylvania CWD index herd, via Louisiana, or Missouri now ?
 
 
 
 
 
From: TSS (216-119-139-126.ipset19.wt.net)
 
Subject: Re: CWD SAMPLING TEXAS (but NOT in the obvious place, the NM, TEXAS border)
 
Date: December 16, 2003 at 11:03 am PST
 
In Reply to: Re: CWD SAMPLING TEXAS (but NOT in the obvious place, the NM, TEXAS border) posted by Ken Waldrup, DVM, PhD on December 15, 2003 at 3:43 pm:
 
HEllo Dr. Waldrup,
 
thank you for your comments and time to come to this board.
 
Ken Waldrup, DVM, PhD states;
 
 
> it is painfully obvious that you do not know or understand the natural distribution of mule deer out there or the rights of the land owners in this state...
 
 
TSS states;
 
 
I am concerned about all deer/elk not just mule deer, and the rights of land owners (in the case with human/animal TSEs) well i am not sure of the correct terminology, but when the States deer/elk/cattle/sheep/humans are at risk, there should be no rights for land owners in this case. the state should have the right to test those animals. there are too many folks out there that are just plain ignorant about this agent. with an agent such as this, you cannot let landowners (and i am one) dictate human/animal health, especially when you cannot regulate the movement of such animals...
 
Ken Waldrup, DVM, PhD states;
 
> Deer and elk from the Guadalupe Peak National Park cannot be collected with federal permission.
 
TSS states;
 
I do not understand this? so there is no recourse of action even if every deer/elk was contaminated with CWD in this area (hypothetical)?
 
Ken Waldrup, DVM, PhD states;
 
> I am concerned about your insinuation that CWD is a human health risk. We are at a stand-off - you have no proof that it is and I have no definitive proof that it isn't. However I would say that the inferred evidence from Colorado, Wyoming and Wisconsin suggests that CWD is not a human health concern (i.e. no evidence of an increased incidence of human brain disorders within the CWD "endemic" areas of these states)...
 
TSS states;
 
 
 
NEXT, let's have a look at the overall distribution of CWD in Free-Ranging Cervids and see where the CWD cluster in NM WSMR borders TEXAS;
 
Current Distribution of Chronic Wasting Disease in Free-Ranging Cervids
 
 
 
 
NOW, the MAP of the Exoregion where the samples were taken to test for CWD;
 
CWD SURVEILLANCE SAMPLE SUBMISSIONS TEXAS
 
 
 
 
Ecoregions of TEXAS
 
 
 
 
IF you look at the area around the NM WSMR where the CWD cluster was and where it borders TEXAS, that ecoregion is called Trans Pecos region. Seems if my Geography and my Ciphering is correct ;-) that region only tested 55% of it's goal. THE most important area on the MAP and they only test some 96 samples, this in an area that has found some 7 positive animals? NOW if we look at the only other border where these deer from NM could cross the border into TEXAS, this area is called the High Plains ecoregion, and again, we find that the sampling for CWD was pathetic. HERE we find that only 9% of it's goal of CWD sampling was met, only 16 samples were tested from some 175 that were suppose to be sampled.
 
 AS i said before;
 
> SADLY, they have not tested enough from the total population to
 
> know if CWD is in Texas or not.
 
BUT now, I will go one step further and state categorically that they are not trying to find it. just the opposite it seems, they are waiting for CWD to find them, as with BSE/TSE in cattle, and it will eventually...
 
 snip...end...TSS
 
 ===============================
 
 
 
 
Monday, February 11, 2013
 
TEXAS CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD Four New Positives Found in Trans Pecos
 
 
 
 
Friday, June 01, 2012
 
*** TEXAS DEER CZAR TO WISCONSIN ASK TO EXPLAIN COMMENTS
 
 
 
 
 
Tuesday, July 10, 2012
 
Chronic Wasting Disease Detected in Far West Texas
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2011 – 2012
 
Friday, October 28, 2011
 
CWD Herd Monitoring Program to be Enforced Jan. 2012 TEXAS
 
Greetings TAHC et al,
 
A kind greetings from Bacliff, Texas.
 
In reply to ;
 
Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) Announcement October 27, 2011
 
 
I kindly submit the following ;
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thursday, May 02, 2013
 
 Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Texas Important Update on OBEX ONLY TEXTING
 
One major change that was adopted as a result of the new federal regulations is the sample collection for diagnostic testing of CWD.
 
Under the old regulations, owners were only required to collect and submit a sample of the obex (brainstem) to the laboratory for testing. The new federal changes require owners to collect and submit a sample of both the obex and retropharyngeal lymph nodes for a more complete diagnostic testing.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Saturday, June 01, 2013
 
Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) Proposes Modifications to Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), Brucellosis, and Other Rules
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
UPDATED DATA ON 2ND CWD STRAIN
 
Wednesday, September 08, 2010 CWD PRION CONGRESS SEPTEMBER 8-11 2010
 
 
 
 
 
Tuesday, June 05, 2012
 
Captive Deer Breeding Legislation Overwhelmingly Defeated During 2012 Legislative Session
 
 
 
 
 
Friday, August 31, 2012
 
COMMITTEE ON CAPTIVE WILDLIFE AND ALTERNATIVE LIVESTOCK and CWD 2009-2012 a review
 
 
 
 
 
Tuesday, April 16, 2013
 
*** Cervid Industry Unites To Set Direction for CWD Reform and seem to ignore their ignorance and denial in their role in spreading Chronic Wasting Disease
 
 
 
 
 
 
Friday, August 24, 2012
 
Diagnostic accuracy of rectal mucosa biopsy testing for chronic wasting disease within white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) herds in North America
 
The overall diagnostic specificity was 99.8%. Selective use of antemortem rectal biopsy sample testing would provide valuable information during disease investigations of CWD-suspect deer herds.
 
 
 
 
 
Tuesday, April 09, 2013
 
EFFICACY OF ANTEMORTEM RECTAL BIOPSIES TO DIAGNOSE AND ESTIMATE PREVALENCE OF CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE IN FREE-RANGING COW ELK (CERVUS ELAPHUS NELSONI)
 
 
 
 
 
Monday, March 18, 2013
 
PROCEEDINGS ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTEENTH ANNUAL MEETING of the UNITED STATES ANIMAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION September 29 – October 5, 2011
 
see updated 2012 RESOLUTIONS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
TSS
 
 
 
 
 
 
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