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Kansas Four more deer test positive for chronic wasting disease

Posted Mar 10 2013 12:51pm
Four more deer test positive for chronic wasting disease
By Michael Pearce The Wichita Eagle Published Saturday, March 9, 2013, at 6:29 p.m. Updated Sunday, March 10, 2013, at 12:35 a.m.
Four Kansas deer recently tested positive for chronic wasting disease, according to Shane Hesting, Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism disease biologist. The department has been testing for the disease that’s always fatal in deer, but has never been found in livestock or humans, for about 15 years.
Hesting said the deer came from Ellis, Norton, Sherman and Trego counties. It’s the first such case from Ellis County.
CWD was first found in a lone deer in Cheyenne County, in extreme northwest Kansas, in 2005. It’s since moved steadily eastward and southward. To date 52 Kansas animals have tested positive for the disease from more than 20,000 tested. In 2011, eight Kansas deer tested positive for the disease. One was from Stafford County, the closest case to Wichita. A deer killed in Sumner County the same year was initially classified as infected, but it later tested negative.
Hesting said Wildlife and Parks’ testing program has changed since the loss of federal funding this year. Only about 375 deer were tested this year, compared to about 2,500 in 2012. To get the most from the limited sample budget, Hesting said Wildlife and Parks is testing different regions of the state annually.
They’re also focusing their testing on mature animals, since they have a higher chance of contracting the contagious disease. All four of the recent positives were bucks at least 3 1/2 years old. Three were shot by hunters. The other was found leaning against a wall in Norton County, emaciated and drooling in October. A game warden killed the animal and submitted it for testing.
CWD was first found along the Colorado/Wyoming border in the mid-1960s, and has recently been found as far east as Pennsylvania and New York.
snip...
 
 
 
 
 
KANSAS
 
 
Chronic Wasting Disease
 
 
The first case of CWD was found in a captive elk in Harper County in 2001. Since that time, CWD has been detected in 49 wild, free-ranging white-tailed and 1 mule deer in Deer Management Units (DMU) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 17.
 
 
In 2010-2011 the first positive mule deer was detected in Decatur County. Currently, the total number of positives since surveillance started in 1996 is 51 (1 captive elk, 1 mule deer, and 49 white-tailed deer). Hunters and other wildlife enthusiasts can avoid the human-assisted spread of CWD by not transporting a live or dead deer or elk from areas where CWD occurs to those areas which are CWD-free. There is currently no known treatment or eradication method for CWD, so preventing the introduction of the the disease into new areas is of utmost importance to the health of local deer herds. Baiting and feeding deer tend to concentrate deer at small point on the landscape, often with the trails leading to the feeding sites resembling the wheel spokes of a bicycle. Anytime animals are concentrated at the "hub," the likelihood of disease transmission increases in a deer herd. More alarming, CWD is not the only serious disease of concern. Diseases such as bovine tuberculosis and a host of detrimental parasites such as exotic lice, meningeal worms, flukes, and stomach worms are transmitted more efficiently when deer are concentrated in a small area.
 
 
Another major concern is the potential for spread of CWD from captive cervid farms into the wild cervid population. Once a disease gets into a wild population, it is virtually impossible eradicate. The only thing that can be done is control the spread of the disease at great expense. KDWPT recommends that every captive cervid rancher enroll in the voluntary CWD monitoring program administered by the Kansas Animal Health Department. The sooner diseases such as CWD can be detected in captives, the sooner control efforts can begin and possibly prevent the spread of disease to wild populations of the state. CWD is only one of many diseases that could go undetected in an unmonitored captive cervid herd. Bovine tuberculosis, for example, is a serious disease that could seriously damage not only populations of deer and an annual 350 million-dollar hunting economy, but could also threaten the 4 billion-dollar Kansas cattle industry via quarantines and loss of accreditation.
 
 
2012-2013 CWD CONFIRMED POSITIVES by County (Surveillance Reduced to Northcentral Zone Due to Funding Cuts)
 
 
Norton = 1
Trego = 1
Ellis = 1
Kansas Counties with CWD Detections (County and Number of Positives To Date) Decatur = 24
Rawlins = 5
Norton = 4
Sheridan = 3
Cheyenne = 2
Graham = 2
Trego = 2
Thomas = 1
Logan = 1
Ford = 1
Sherman = 1
Stafford = 1
Wallace = 1
Smith = 1
Ellis = 1
Harper = 1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thursday, July 19, 2012
NINE DEER TEST POSITIVE FOR CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE
 
 
 
 
 
Thursday, February 09, 2012
THREE KANSAS DEER CONFIRMED POSITIVE IN EARLY STAGES OF CWD TESTING
 
 
 
 
Thursday, March 31, 2011
TEN KANSAS DEER CONFIRMED POSITIVE IN CWD TESTS
 
 
 
 
Thursday, January 06, 2011
KANSAS FIRST CASE OF CHRONIC WASTING IN 2010 DEER SEASON CONFIRMED
 
 
 
 
Thursday, January 21, 2010
Kansas has more CWD cases
 
 
 
Tuesday, June 05, 2012
Captive Deer Breeding Legislation Overwhelmingly Defeated During 2012 Legislative Session
 
 
 
Surveillance for CWD in free-ranging populations has documented a continual geographic spread of the disease throughout North America.
 
 
Volume 18, Number 3—March 2012
 
 
Synopsis
 
 
Occurrence, Transmission, and Zoonotic Potential of Chronic Wasting Disease
 
 
snip...
 
 
Originally recognized only in southeastern Wyoming and northeastern Colorado, USA, CWD was reported in Canada in 1996 and Wisconsin in 2001 and continues to be identified in new geographic locations (Figure 1, panel A). CWD has been identified in free-ranging cervids in 15 US states and 2 Canadian provinces and in ≈100 captive herds in 15 states and provinces and in South Korea (Figure 1, panel B). Except in South Korea, CWD has not been detected outside North America. In most locations reporting CWD cases in free-ranging animals, the disease continues to emerge in wider geographic areas, and prevalence appears to be increasing in many disease-endemic areas. Areas of Wyoming now have an apparent CWD prevalence of near 50% in mule deer, and prevalence in areas of Colorado and Wisconsin is <15 0="" 10="" 5="" according="" adult="" age="" agencies.="" and="" appear="" areas="" between="" but="" cwd="" data="" deer.="" deer="" div="" elk="" factors="" for="" from="" gene="" genetic="" highest="" however="" in="" include="" influence="" influences="" is="" known="" less="" lower="" male="" many="" obtained="" of="" parts="" polymorphisms="" prevalence="" provincial="" prp="" reaches="" remain="" remains="" reports="" risk="" scrapie.="" sex="" show="" state="" strong="" susceptibility="" than="" the="" to="" understood="" wildlife="" wyoming.="">
 
 
SNIP...
 
 
Long-term effects of CWD on cervid populations and ecosystems remain unclear as the disease continues to spread and prevalence increases. In captive herds, CWD might persist at high levels and lead to complete herd destruction in the absence of human culling. Epidemiologic modeling suggests the disease could have severe effects on free-ranging deer populations, depending on hunting policies and environmental persistence (8,9). CWD has been associated with large decreases in free-ranging mule deer populations in an area of high CWD prevalence (Boulder, Colorado, USA) (5).
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Friday, February 08, 2013
 
*** Behavior of Prions in the Environment: Implications for Prion Biology
 
 
 
Friday, November 09, 2012
 
*** Chronic Wasting Disease CWD in cervidae and transmission to other species
 
 
 
Sunday, November 11, 2012
 
*** Susceptibilities of Nonhuman Primates to Chronic Wasting Disease November 2012
 
 
 
Friday, December 14, 2012
 
Susceptibility Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in wild cervids to Humans 2005 - December 14, 2012
 
 
 
Tuesday, December 18, 2012
 
*** A Growing Threat How deer breeding could put public trust wildlife at risk
 
 
 
as the crow flies, something to ponder also ;
 
 
Friday, March 01, 2013
Pennsylvania CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE FOUND IN BLAIR AND BEDFORD COUNTIES GAME COMMISSION TO HOLD CWD NEWS CONFERENCE MONDAY, MARCH 4
 
 
more on Great Escape of CWD from Pennsylvania 2012 coming out of Indiana
A farm in Pennsylvania, where chronic wasting disease was detected, has sold 10 animals to farms in Indiana over the past three years. DNR spokesman Phil Bloom said two were sold to farms in Noble and Whitley counties; the rest went to two facilities in Jackson County, one of which is the site of the escape.
 
 
 
see full text and more ;
Wednesday, November 14, 2012
PENNSYLVANIA 2012 THE GREAT ESCAPE OF CWD INVESTIGATION MOVES INTO LOUISIANA and INDIANA
 
 
 
Monday, January 28, 2013
Chronic Wasting Disease been found in Maryland February 2011, DNR received positive laboratory confirmation
 
 
WV cwd
 
 
see map ;
 
 
does not look good for Ohio or Indiana...testing and time will tell...
what about Texas and CWD ?
yep, while the Texas deer czar dr. dough was off to Wisconsin pushing the privately owned shooting pen industry (livestock cervids industry), Texas fell to CWD, and just reported 4 more CWD postives. ...
 
 
for your information...
 
 
According to Wisconsin’s White-Tailed Deer Trustee Dr. James Kroll, people who call for more public hunting opportunities are “pining for socialism.” He further states, “(Public) Game management is the last bastion of communism.”
 
 
“Game Management,” says James Kroll, driving to his high-fenced, two-hundred-acre spread near Nacogdoches, “is the last bastion of communism.” Kroll, also known as Dr. Deer, is the director of the Forestry Resources Institute of Texas at Stephen F. Austin State University, and the “management” he is referring to is the sort practiced by the State of Texas. The 55-year-old Kroll is the leading light in the field of private deer management as a means to add value to the land. His belief is so absolute that some detractors refer to him as Dr. Dough, implying that his eye is on the bottom line more than on the natural world.
 
 
Kroll, who has been the foremost proponent of deer ranching in Texas for more than thirty years, doesn’t mind the controversy and certainly doesn’t fade in the heat. People who call for more public lands are “cocktail conservationists,” he says, who are really pining for socialism. He calls national parks “wildlife ghettos” and flatly accuses the government of gross mismanagement. He argues that his relatively tiny acreage, marked by eight-foot fences and posted signs warning off would-be poachers, is a better model for keeping what’s natural natural while making money off the land.
 
 
Tuesday, July 10, 2012
Dr. James C. Kroll Texas deer czar final report on Wisconsin
 
 
Friday, June 01, 2012
*** TEXAS DEER CZAR TO WISCONSIN ASK TO EXPLAIN COMMENTS
 
 
Thursday, March 29, 2012
TEXAS DEER CZAR SAYS WISCONSIN DNR NOT DOING ENOUGH ABOUT CWD LIKE POT CALLING KETTLE BLACK
 
 
Tuesday, July 10, 2012
Chronic Wasting Disease Detected in Far West Texas
 
 
Monday, February 11, 2013
TEXAS CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD Four New Positives Found in Trans Pecos
 
 
layperson
Terry S. Singeltary Sr. P.O. Box 42 Bacliff, Texas USA 77518 flounder9@verizon.net
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